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Old 20-03-2011, 06:35 PM
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Default Iguana caresheet

This information has been updated with the help of iguanaquinn, maddragon and myself, much of this information has came from links and reads I have researched I have placed the links in this as cross reference.
I know there was another thread but I enconterd some problems with that one, so please just hold your posts for 5 minutes while I paste it all over
Thanks for your patience.

Last edited by kato; 20-03-2011 at 08:38 PM..
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2011, 06:37 PM
Salazare Slytherin's Avatar
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Location: In the Amazon Rain Forest
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  1. What is an iguana?
    2. Considering an iguana?
    3. Choosing an iguana?
    4. Enclosure (Free roaming considerations)
    5 Diets of the iguana and safe plants
    6. Heating and Lighting
    7. Substrates and the surrounding debates.
    8. Other information
    9. Taming tips
    10. Personal experience of your trips to the vet
    11. Choosing a vet
    12. useful links
    13. recommended books
    14. recommended products
    and pretty much anything else we can think of.



Many get baby iguana's not realising how large and aggressive they can get.
Latin name: iguana iguana.
Family:Iguanaid.
These animals are not recommended for many reasons, we will get into that later on however. the green iguana is a majestic lizard being famously known as the dinosaur of the living room.
The green iguana is a reptile found throughout Central and South America.

There are many reasons enthusiasts are attracted to these magnificent lizards But there are some very serious considerations to take!

They can grow up to 7ft in legnth and weigh 15 pounds or more, although this is rare and they usually average around the 4-5ft mark give or take a few inches.
This needs to be took into consideration when wishing to handle your animal, another consideration is there sharp claws, they wont scratch you dliberately but it can hurt when handling, making a pair of gauntlets a great peice of equipement to the iguana owner, they also have powerful tails and have been known to be able to knock fully grown adults off balance, these are all considerations to take.
So if you are still reading, you also need to be aware they are not accomodated the same way as most other reptiles? They need extremely large enclosures at "least" the size of a double wardrobe or bigger, the bigger the better.





Then you need to consider how you are going to heat it safely for you,your home and most importantly the occupant the green iguana.
I must also add to this it does not stop there either, iguanas are renowned for there diets and can eat a lot.
This must be taken into consideration before purchasing or rescuing a green ig.

Then these lizards need what is called UV, it is extremely a vital part of their survival, they need these mimicing rays of sunlight to synthesize vitamin d3 properly and appropriately.
There are many products out there but again we will discuss which ones we recommend a little later on,

As you can see you need to invest alot of money into a green iguana and perhaps if you are still reading this you can continue to read all the other good stuff myself Salazare Slytherin (Dixon) and Iguanaquinn, Maddragon have strived hard to work at



When considering an iguana, just think for a moment? are you ready for a reptile that can live up to 15 years + if given the right care needs?
Are you confident you can house a fully grown adult when it reaches these stages.
Are you confident that you will be able to cope with a animal which is famous for not taming down and being aggressive! (although there are some exceptions)
AND MOST IMPORTANTLY! make sure you locate a reptile vet near you and or are able to reach one should something ever happen to your pet.



Okay so you seem determined so lets get to it, firstly you need to consider how old is the iguana you want?
A baby, a juvenile, a sub adult, an adult, have you prepared the enclosure back home?
Check out your rescue centres as iguanas are very common.
If not we need to follow the guidelines as with most animals.

Look for any obvious signs of illness?
is the iguana alert and the colour it should be?
is it a good weight?
i there any discharge coming from the mouth and nostrils?
can you see any bleeding anywhere?
Look at the toes are any different to any others? (this may not be a major issue?
If you are looking at a rescue it may have a few batters on it such as old burns, broken toes or loss of tails but there is no reason they can't make a great reptile pet.





First and foremost an iguana that does not want to be handled and will use all its strength to avoid this indicates a very healthy animal, if one just sits there on you unless it is a rescue and has had some kind of human contact it is very unlikely that animal is healthy

Please resist the urge to buy these animals however cruel it might be?
for one reason you may be buying from a not so good shop and therefore should not be funded to do the same to another animal.
Secondly you will likely end up with a dead pet and a huge cost at your vet? this only ends in sadness one way or the other.
OUOTED mad dragon Lynda RFUK member



A lot of people get lovely baby iguanas from shops... not realising just how quick they grow (very, if fed and kept right). They also do not realise that an iguanas first defence as a youngster is to close eyes and wish you away. However as the iguana grows, its hormones and attitude grows aswell... and often they hit the iguana "teenage phase" at around 2 year old. This rush of hormonal behaviour is often what causes most iguanas to be passed from person to person, so if you are seriously considering an iguana, I’d consider re homing one... NOT buying from a shop (no matter how cute the babies are... remember they grow fast!). These hormones bring on sexual behaviour. Male iguanas will often become nasty towards human females, especially around their time of the month... or when they are pregnant. Female iguanas can also turn into monsters, but are less likely to do so. However with a female iguana you have to think about accommodating her laying behaviour. All female iguanas tend to lay eggs, whether near a male or not, so need (very) large nesting boxes deep enough to dig in, and also problems can arise such as going off food/colours changing/behaviour and of course, egg binding. Diets have to be top-notch and supplementation has to be spot on to stop a female iguana having problems during breeding season.


And she is absaloutley right these lizards look good
Please bear this in mind, when considering an iguana.






Quote Maddragon rfuk member
Iguanas, to put in short, are a LOT of HARD and often PAINFUL work, which takes a long long time. Patience is something all iguana owners need, and they need to know that their hard work might not even pay off, and that iguanas are very ungrateful. There is no shame in admitting after reading about iguanas that they would be "too much" for you, or that they wouldn't suit the kind of household you have. the only shame people should have with these creatures is rushing into getting one, and not doing their research thoroughly at the expense of the poor animal




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Salazare Slytherin is the sexiest RFUK'er there ever was nom
If you buy only one book on nutrition.
This is the one to get.
http://www.arcadia-reptile.com/nutrition-guide/
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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2011, 06:38 PM
Salazare Slytherin's Avatar
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Iguana Housing

This is a very important area to look at, they are not housed the same as most other reptiles, this is one main factor of why iguanas are usually dumped and end up in rescues with not much of a life.
2 of my past iguanas were rescues because they grew too big and were very aggressive.
It is tempting to buy an aquarium or tank for a small baby iguana and they can easily be housed in these at this age, but bear in mind these lizards will very quickly out grow them,
quoting from R.M Smiths iguana book there are some problems with this, Little baby iguanas will hang from the screen tops and can then potentially break there toes (take this into consideration)


Guessing the size enclosure for your iguana is no good, you will always guess to small.
Buying new enclosures every few months is going to cost a lot of unnecessary money, it is also difficult to purchase iguanariums but it is still worth looking around,


Buy a good sized cage at first, approximately 4 ft in legnth and 3-4 ft high this enclosure will last a little while, the cage should have some areas of privacy Particularly if you are housing more than one iguana which is not recommended for many reasons we will discuss later but some do with success.
Your iguana is also going to want to climb, they have an instinct to climb and depriving them of this option is only going to cause your iguana stress so they need climbing branches size needs upgrading as they get older.


The branches need to be fixed properly to support the weight of the iguana,
Do not use branches from redwood, eucalyptus, pine cedar, they can be harmful to your pet.
Be sure to know what you are choosing if picking from outside.


As the iguana gets older it will need bigger and better enclosures, you want to be looking at a guideline of AT LEAST a double sized wardrobe to house an adult and then bigger if possible.
Here are some pictures to give you an idea all acquired off google


Iguanaquinns guideline RFUK MEMBER QUOTE

AGE.S.V.L. .S.T.L.
Just hatched..............2 Inches head to vent ............6-8 inches total length.

At 3 months old..........4 inches head to vent.............12 inches total length.

At 6 months old..........6 inches head to vent..............18 inches total length.

At 1 year old................8 inches head to vent..............2 foot total length.

At 18 months old........10 inches head to vent............30 inches total length.

At 2 years old..............12 inches head to vent.............3 foot total length.

At 3 years old..............16 inches head to vent.............45 inches total length.

At 4 years old..............18 inches head to vent.............54 inches total length.

At 5 years old..............20 inches head to vent.............5 foot total length

At 6 years old..............22 inches head to vent.............66 inches total length.

At 7 years old..............up to 24 inches head to vent....Up to 6 foot total length.



Caution
Bearing in mind the size of your Iguana at 1 year old. At this age they can inflict a very painful bite and they are readily willing to do so. This is not a docile animal these are very highly strung defensive WILD animals and when challenged can be extremely aggressive. Beware of tail whipping also as they have a very powerful tail and is generally the first sign that you are too close, but not necessarily the first sign of defensiveness/aggression.
Iguanas with the correct temperatures and diet will reach maturity around the age of between 2 – 3. At this point if you have been lucky enough to tame your Iguana they are able to completely change and become very aggressive, therefore it is important to note that if you purchase/acquire a young Iguana and it is tame it may not stay that way!

Young healthy Iguanas should shed often, this shed it is important to remember that the humidity needs to be maintained in order for the iguana to shed properly. If they are not maintained at the correct humidity, as well as long term health problems short term may also occur. Constriction of toes and tail can often occur, worst case scenario the blood may be stopped to the limb. If you believe that this may be a problem ensure to bathe your Iguana regularly.


Check this out see what you think...











http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-GTQh8HHg5Nk/TVi-e90dEgI/AAAAAAAAAGo/7RwvFeM_bvw/s1600/kandang%2Biguana3.jpg&imgrefurl=http://hobbycanbefun.blogspot.com/2011/02/iguanas-home-size.html&usg=__ieElOaTeAbXDq7I9MFWipQQDRPM=&h=461 &w=614&sz=56&hl=en&start=1&zoom=1&tbnid=Z6lCBlpfOr FEQM:&tbnh=102&tbnw=136&ei=6PaETf_BLYy3hAf-qbW5BA&prev=/images%3Fq%3Diguana%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26 biw%3D1003%26bih%3D429%26tbs%3Disch:1&um=1&itbs=1


http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://www.iguanacageplans.com/images/dans-cage.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.iguanacageplans.com/&usg=__KB_FyzHtDJbarfdf7WEaUlhBrsU=&h=392&w=326&sz =27&hl=en&start=4&zoom=1&tbnid=03pIORDEwM5KSM:&tbn h=123&tbnw=102&ei=EPeETdvyCM-EhQer8Z3FBA&prev=/images%3Fq%3Diguana%2Bcage%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26bi w%3D1003%26bih%3D429%26tbs%3Disch:1&um=1&itbs=1


http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://www.greenigsociety.org/jpg/CRhabitat.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.greenigsociety.org/habitatexamples.htm&usg=__UXfsvMFnCUf30voHr8rnS0Zh _bQ=&h=300&w=400&sz=56&hl=en&start=6&zoom=1&tbnid= Us66Ykz4uksfHM:&tbnh=93&tbnw=124&ei=EPeETdvyCM-EhQer8Z3FBA&prev=/images%3Fq%3Diguana%2Bcage%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26bi w%3D1003%26bih%3D429%26tbs%3Disch:1&um=1&itbs=1
you kind of get the idea, be sure to consider all safety for your animal when setting it up and minimize those risks which you think might cause problems.
Also I thought I would just add, if you notice your iguana gets aggressive toward you in the viv but not out this is because, it is like there bedroom, how would you like someone just barging in on your privacy? Just take that into account loll.


Other considerations, how are you going to clean the enclosure!
Some people have a draw like device of the bottom of the cages for ease and safety.
Also bear in mind that electrics are going to be placed inside the enclosure and humidity is also an issue, WATER and ELECTRICITY a lethal combination, this is where it is your responsibility to make sure everything risk wise is minimised, that you have set everything up correctly the way it should be.


Free roaming iguana's from my researched sources should have at least one basking favourite spot.
For humidity there are a few options you can use, buy a humidifier from Argos or somewhere similar, or bathe the iguana frequently, this is a massive issue, free roaming iguanas can be dangerous too, particularly in breeding season, these lizards are not stupid, infact quite the opposite, I have seen it where my iguana has chased me across the floor around breeding season!


They are also profoundly knowing to be the ones to cause floods, and other majour problems,
I recall AZUK moderator of rfuk stating he has been called out on rescues to fetch iguanas down off trees and roofs.


This is something that needs to be thought about completely and then there is the issue of toilet training, although if you have laminated flooring it should not be too much of an issue, I would still personally have an enclosure for an iguana to retreat back into once they are coming to the end of a day! And then also perhaps having a temporary one for when the weather begins to get colder, I have herd of horrific things happening to free roaming iguanas during the winter months because of the drafts e.t.c


Please take this into consideration.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bexzini
Salazare Slytherin is the sexiest RFUK'er there ever was nom
If you buy only one book on nutrition.
This is the one to get.
http://www.arcadia-reptile.com/nutrition-guide/
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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2011, 06:39 PM
Salazare Slytherin's Avatar
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Location: In the Amazon Rain Forest
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Reviews: 30
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Diet

This is a very very complex area, and in my time of researching this you will find many pieces of conflicting data.
I have successfully kept a 15 year old adult iguana on the diet I offer,
He would have lived longer should he not have needed putting to sleep
This consists of

Rocket
Watercress
Spring greens (Same as Collard greens
Green cabbage
Romaine lettuce (Hydration) in theory
Kale- I offer this occasionally as it is supposed to bind calcium.

Asparaguses
carrot (shredded, and the tops are relished too)
Parsnip (shredded)
Swede (shredded)
Turnip (shredded)
I also offer cucumber occasionally again to assure he is hydrated)
Green and Red peppers (chopped up)
Butter nut squash (I cut this into slices, place them on a plate, and them microwave them for a minute, this is then damped again and the skin is cut off around them) then they are chopped up into edible pieces.




I also offer the dry food formula for tortoises, once a month, I have been led to believe that this is fine for iguana's
I sprinkle his food with calcium carbonate 2-3 times a week I buy this off e bay http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/CALCIUM-CARBONATE-1kg-GROUND-LIMESTONE-FLOUR-/300527962764?pt=UK_Pet_Supplies_Reptiles_Spiders_I nsects&hash=item45f8dcca8c
and for protein I offer the occasional Kidney beans.
I have been unable to locate alfalfa hay as of yet so I cannot say I have tried it but I have read that this is also meant to be good.

I also place sugar snap peas, green beans and pea pods into his diet too, these are relished with great success.

I have also herd of whole meal bread being used but have not used this as of yet, this is diped in water to offer them hydration also (apparently)







When season allows I also offer Hibiscus, and dandilions, and occasionally offer herbs to top off his food including parsley, Corriander, Lemon grass, Basil and Peppermint.

His fruit is only offered 4 times a year, this includes grapes, strawberrries, mango, and sliced kiwi,
He may also eat peach choped up to should I see fit to place it into his diet, just for something different.





I have also read from numerous sources that mashed potato and pasta is fine for them too.
So for this reason he may receive some off our Sunday dinner separately once a month and same with pasta Pasta is a very good carbohydrate.

Other useful links to look at in regards to iguana diet is
Green Iguana Society
Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation for Herps
Nutrition | green-iguana.info
Iguana Nutrition | Daily Nutrients, Advanced Nutrients
Iguana Q&As II





Please be open minded, there is still much debate surrounding this area and these are based off numerous links and reads, that they all agree on

80% of the diet is greens 10% veg 7% fruit and 3% protein.
I try to follow this guideline and like most gained my information from many sources before questing out and aquiring my first iguana,

They need proper nutrition, it is no good just dumping a bit of lettuce and tomato in with a bit of apple, and hoping for the best, you WILL end up with a serisouly ill iguana and possibly a dead animal.

There is much information out there, I have provided some links but there are many, research, research and more research! and be open minded not all information will agree.




Other foods to consider are


Celery
Escarole
Dahlia (flower)
Endive
Mushrooms (very occasionally)
Spinach but again rarely before I get jumped please check out the links first and then I am willing and open for discussion not before then.
Papaya


I found this and thought this would be useful as a rough guideline to iguana keepers

1. Calcium rich vegetables: 40-50% of diet, 2 or more items per feeding-turnip greens, mustard greens, beet greens, kale, collards, bok choy, Swiss chard, dandelions, parsley, romaine, escarole, and spinach. Spinach must not be over used as it binds iodine and calcium.
2. Other vegetables: 30-40% of diet, a variety weekly. Frozen mixed vegetables, squash, zucchini, sweet potato, bell pepper, broccoli, peas, beans, okra, carrot, and pumpkin.
3.Grain/fiber: up to 20% of diet. Boiled rice, boiled pasta, whole grain breads and cereals.
4.Fruit: contain mostly fructose and fiber. Dilutes more valuable nutrients in other food items, so minimize its use. Figs, papaya, melon, apple, peaches, plums, strawberries, tomatoes, banana (with skin), grapes, kiwi.
5.Legumes: more important for young iguanas, up to 5% total diet. Boiled lentils, navy beans, pinto beans, kidney beans.
Adult Iguanas are primarily fed the calcium rich veggies with small amounts from the rest of the list periodically. Senior Iguanas are primarily calcium rich greens.
Vitamin supplementation is most important in to growing iguana A multivitamin supplement should be used twice weekly.Examples include Reptivite (Zoo-Med), Reptical (Tetra), Nekton, and human Centrum. straight calcium supplement should be used 4 to 5 times weekly. This supplement should contain no phosphorus and does not need vitamin D. Iguanas seem to be unable to absorb vitamin D well from their diets.
*Older iguanas (adults) require a multivitamin once to twice monthly. Calcium may be given once weekly
Iguana


There are many possibilities you can think off when offering a diet, it is only hard if you make it hard.
The iguana depends entirely on you for its survival, it needs proper nutrition and this is one of the best things you can provide for it so please do not take this area lightly, Do not offer food that looks like it has begun to go off! It will do your pet no good.
Fresh and nutritious is the way forward


Iguana vitamin dusts that I have used in the past consist of these


http://www.petsathome.com/shop/vetark-calci-dust-150gm-28110
http://www.repcal.com/supp.htm
And the link I offered at the top of this, I now by pure calcium carbonate off e bay, it is a lot cheaper and you seem to get more than in a box with a reptile on it, however some are specifically formulated for herbivores so it is your choice.
and I found this link and thought it would be useful.


http://www.vetark.co.uk/pages/How-to-use-supplements-for-reptiles.aspx?pageid=258







__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bexzini
Salazare Slytherin is the sexiest RFUK'er there ever was nom
If you buy only one book on nutrition.
This is the one to get.
http://www.arcadia-reptile.com/nutrition-guide/
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2011, 06:40 PM
Salazare Slytherin's Avatar
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Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: In the Amazon Rain Forest
Posts: 16,141
Reviews: 30
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Safe plants

guana safe plants and trees which are considered safe, this is likely to be providing they have not been sprayed with anything, otherwise considered none toxic

Acacia Google Image Result for http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/61/Acacia_dealbata.jpg
African Violet
Google Image Result for http://www.flowersgrowing.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/12/african-violet.jpg
Aloe
Google Image Result for http://aloe-vera-juice.net/images/aloe-vera.gif
American Bitter-sweet
Google Image Result for http://www.bio.brandeis.edu/fieldbio/medicinal_plants/images/american_bittersweet_berries_full.jpg
Autumn Olive
Google Image Result for http://www.tytyga.com/product/image2/1131/Untitled-3.jpg?1262269738

I sourced this list from this website here I added the images in the hope they will be helpful to those wishing something a little more naturalistic
The Iguana Den - Iguana Care, Keeping, & Community

Baby tears
Google Image Result for http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51DXYxtpvCL._SL500_AA280_gardening_.jpg
Bamboo

Barberry
Google Image Result for http://www.rutgersln.com/ProductImages/BARBERRY%20CRIMSON%20PYGMY.JPG
American Beach
Google Image Result for http://www.capecoastalnursery.com/images/Beach%20Grass%20Plugs%20%202.jpg
Begonia
Google Image Result for http://images.mooseyscountrygarden.com/hampton-court-flower-show/hampton-court-flower-show/begonia-flower-display.jpg

Bladdernum
http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgur...:1&um=1&itbs=1
Blueberry
http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgur...:1&um=1&itbs=1
Bougainvillea Villea





  • Chickweed
  • Christmas cactus
  • Cissus (kangaroo vine)
  • Coffee plant (NOT coffee bean, rattle bush, rattlebox or coffeeweed)
  • Coleus
  • Comfrey
  • Coralberry (NOT Coral plant)
  • Corn plant
  • Cotoneaster firethorn
  • Crabapple
D
  • Dandelion
  • Dogwood
  • Donkey tail
  • Dracaena varieties
E
  • Elderberry (common, European, red)
F
  • Ferns (asparagus, bird's nest, Boston - and related, maidenhair)
  • Figs (creaping, rubber, fiddle leaf, laurel leaf)
  • Fir (balsam, Douglas, subalpine, white)
G
  • Gardenia
  • Grape ivy (vine)
H
  • Hen and chicken
  • Herbs (such as oregano, rosemary or thyme - NOT parsley)
  • Huckleberry
I
  • Ivy (ONLY grape & Swedish)
J
  • Jade plant
K
  • Kalanchoe
M
  • Magnolia
  • Marigolds
  • Monkey plant
  • Mother-in-law's tongue
N
  • Nasturtium
  • Natal plum
  • Norfolk Island pine
P
  • Palms (areca, date, fan, lady, parlour, howeia, kentia, Phoenix, sago)
  • Pepperomia
  • Petunia
  • Pine (ponderosa, spruce, Virginia, white)
  • Pittosporum
  • Pothos
  • Prayer plant
  • Purple passion (velvet nettle)
R
  • Raspberry
  • Rose
S
  • Schefflera (umbrella)
  • Sensitive plant
  • Snowberry
  • Spider plant
  • Spruce (black, Norway, red, white)
  • Swedish ivy
T
  • Thistle
U
  • Umbrella plant
V
  • Velvet nettle
  • Viburnum
W
  • Wandering Jew
  • Wax plant
  • White clover
  • White poplar
  • Willow
Z
  • Zebra plant

this is not so good, think carefully when placing plastic ones inside an enclosure especially young ones they will attempt to eat them.
Some of the good points around real plants are they are beneficial to an iguana, they help with humidity are not toxic and you don’t have to worry and then of course they look awesome too.
http://en.allexperts.com/q/Reptiles-704/Green-Iguanas-house-hold.htm




Also keep an eye out for thorn less cactus too it may prove valuable, now I am using an old office document to type this and I attempted at the image thing again but it just was not having it, once this is on the forum however I will go through them all individually and post links of the images and I really hope this section has been a help.
There are probably hundreds more, but this is down to the individual to research and what they li
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bexzini
Salazare Slytherin is the sexiest RFUK'er there ever was nom
If you buy only one book on nutrition.
This is the one to get.
http://www.arcadia-reptile.com/nutrition-guide/
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2011, 06:41 PM
Salazare Slytherin's Avatar
Parseltongue
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: In the Amazon Rain Forest
Posts: 16,141
Reviews: 30
Default

Heating and lighting








Iguanas are very delicate in the way that the iguana temperature in the habitat is of the utmost importance. This is due to the fact that in the wild, iguanas get their vitamins and nutrients from basking in the hot sun and although it looks like they are being lazy and lethargic, they are actually gathering life-sustaining nutrients. It is also true that an iguana can actually see the UV rays that are emitted from the sun, which is something that humans cannot do to demonstrate how imperative sunlight and heat are to the iguana. In order to understand how to properly regulate iguana temperature in the habitat, lets examine the essential needs of the iguana in captivity.
Proper Heat & Light For Captive Iguanas
There are a number of products available to help regulate the iguana temperature rates inside of the habitat but first, lets outline a few of the misconceptions that are common among new iguana owners.
The fish tank lights that are typically a part of the package comes with a fluorescent UVB light that fixes to the top of the tank is far from the adequate lighting for an iguana. These are very weak and do not give the iguana temperature much difference as they are basically 'cool' lights. The type of UVB light that an iguana requires to maintain proper iguana temperature is typically an incandescent light that is round in structure for heat as well as the UVB fluorescent light that will supply adequate lighting for the iguana.
The fish tank lights are not sufficient in creating the kind of atmosphere that an iguana is comfortable in or can thrive in so be sure that you have proper lighting. Again, the iguana temperature is a direct correlation with the health of the iguana and is incredibly important to the well being of the iguana. It should also be said that the fluorescent UVB light should be placed at least 8-14 inches from the area that the iguana spends most of its time in.
Many first time iguana owners also believe that the entire habitat needs to be the same temperature and this is a complete falsehood as iguana temperature varies just as it would in the wild. The iguana is not only in need of a hot spot to gather UV rays that are imitated by the heating lamps; it is also in need of a cool area.
The cool area as well as the nighttime iguana temperature should be around 74-85 degrees Fahrenheit while the basking area for the iguana should always be a balmy 90-94 degrees Fahrenheit.









Okay I have personally had great success with Ceramic light heaters, They are placed at the highest point to give off a good temperature, the temperature could range anywhere from 90-95 Farenheight and this is 32-34 C the night time temperature should be allowed to drop no further than 74 F
I buy the 250 Watt ceramic bulbs, this helps heat the large enclosure of iguanas better than some of the lower wattage types.
I also have a spare spot light at least knocking around just incase something ever happens, they are cheap enough so there is no excuse for it! Lol




The bulb should of course be connected to a thermostat, this will allow a constant temperature to be maintained, bear in mind not using a thermostat, your bulb is going to get extremely hot, as hot as an iron and this is a majour fire risk, please bear that in mind, also make sure there is some type of guard surrounding it or a mesh type roof to stop your iguana climbing on it and burning itself.






and replace every six months, many are on the market, some supposedly better than others, the Arcadia and sunglo's e.t.c is a matter of personal choice.


This is based on nothing but what has worked for me.
However I am going to be checking out some of the other lamps with a UV reader.








Substrates and considerations


One excellent substrate I found with iguanas is the zoomed reptile bark, this is excellent for achieving the humidity levels for your pet, the down side to this is like with most particulate substrates there is always the risk it could injest some of it and eventually cause impaction.


Newspaper, easily affordible, not lickley to get injested but does not look nice for the naturalistic type of enclosures


Reptile carpet this is okay to use, but you will need to keep an eye out for bits of thread catching and constricting the toes, for that very reason I don’t use it personally.


Please be aware that there are pictures of iguanas sitting on sawdust, the commercial types used for rodents e.t.c is not a good route to go down, it can be particularly harmful to an iguana, because it is impossible to know what source it came from I would advise against this.
It is said that most rodent types of bedding can have a harmful oil which can cause reptiles to become serisouly ill, I do not know much about this so am not going to comment any further, but should I find anything while I am researching I will be sure to ad it.




Other information


This text here is from maddragon rfuk member and is fully credited with the information here, she has very kindly gave me permission to use this for this section in particular so it is thanks to her that you have this






"Okay, so its 1am. But I have been asked many a time what it is like keeping iguanas. I have written out a response to this tonight, and would like to put it in here for you all to see

Iguanas, to put in short, are a LOT of HARD and often PAINFUL work, which takes a long long time. Patience is something all iguana owners need, and they need to know that their hard work might not even pay off, and that iguanas are very ungrateful. There is no shame in admitting after reading about iguanas that they would be "too much" for you, or that they wouldn't suit the kind of household you have. the only shame people should have with these creatures is rushing into getting one, and not doing their research thoroughly at the expense of the poor animal.

Daily keep isn't too difficult once you are into a routine... but my own iguana has his own bath available 24/7 so daily baths aren't essential, which takes a big part from it. Diets are complex, but nothing really to worry about once you do your research and know what not to and what to feed on a daily basis.
Husbandry is fine once research is done... humidity, baths, feeding daily (oh and big iggys can eat a lot of food, which can cost a lot of money), UV needs changing every 6 months. The only thing is the final set up and how to accomodate it with basking temps. Alot of people struggle to heat large enclosures. And tight basking areas with single bulbs are not an option of iguanas.... as the basking spot needs to be big enough to get the whole iguana in it, otherwise burns often happen. This is due to the iguana having only heat sensors in his head, so if his head is cool but, for example, his leg is under a heat bulb, he can burn and not even know.

Behaviour is where most people struggle. Iguanas can be (And often are) very viscious. They are equiped with a tail that can cause lacerations that need stitching, and jaws that can chop off your finger, and they are intellegent. I cannot describe enough the intellegence in these creatures. If they want to do damage, they wait till the opportune moment... when you have your guard down, or when they are showing off when you have company, and they get you hard.

A lot of people get lovely baby iguanas from shops... not realising just how quick they grow (very, if fed and kept right). They also do not realise that an iguanas first defence as a youngster is to close eyes and wish you away. However as the iguana grows, its hormones and attitude grows aswell... and often they hit the iguana "teenage phase" at around 2 year old. This rush of hormonal behaviour is often what causes most iguanas to be passed from person to person, so if you are seriously considering an iguana, i'd consider rehoming one... NOT buying from a shop (no matter how cute the babies are... remember they grow fast!). These hormones bring on sexual behaviour. Male iguanas wlil often become nasty towards human females, especially around their time of the month... or when they are pregnant. Female iguanas can also turn into monsters, but are less likely to do so. However with a female iguana you have to think about accomodating her laying behaviour. All female iguanas tend to lay eggs, whether near a male or not, so need (very) large nesting boxes deep enough to dig in, and also problems can arise such as going off food/colours changing/behaviour and of course, egg binding. Diets have to be top-notch and supplementation has to be spot on to stop a female iguana having problems during breeding season.

iguana... or leave them to free roam. However if you do this theres lots to consider. An iguana will destroy everything it gets near, and try to climb whatever it cant destroy. So if you are in the little bit house proud, an iguana is not for you.

Behaviour is where most keepers stumble when it comes to iguanas. You may think that baby iguana is cute and tame. However chances are the poor thing is simply too terrified to do anything.
Wait until it grows two feet, and gets a good helping of hormones... you'll soon realise your cute baby is nothing but a terror. He'll want to be the boss of you, and from there the fun begins. This is also, unfortunately, the age when most iguanas get tossed from person to person, as people dont realise how fierce they can be.

"Taming" as some people call it, can be a long process. With some iguanas never calming down at all. I am a believer that iguanas can never be fully tamed. However you can earn their trust... with a lot of work. And in turn earn the right to be around them and near them without being bitten and whipped to shreds. And if you shy from hard work, and simply think it'll calm down... then do yourself a favour.. go get a pet rock. These creatures are usually around the 6foot mark, and you dont want an animal that size against you.

And if you dont believe me, ask around. I'm sure theres plenty of iguana keepers with plenty of scars to prove it.

If you can stick it out however, you can have yourself a wonderful and rewarding "pet". They are so fascinating, intellegent, and simply magnificent to look at. I wouldn't change my own for the world, even his bad attitude. He's still territorial, and still whips whilst in his tank, however once you get him out you can take him in the garden, and he simply loves a bath.

If you do think you can overcome all the obstacles an iguana gives you, then please consider this as a last note. Due to people not doing their research before purchasing one of these lovely animals, there are plenty out there that need good homes. Often they have not been given the best start, however with hard work they can calm down as much as an iguana from a shop."


I am not going to apologise for writing an Essay, simply because i am passionate about these creatures. And if you cannot read the above, then you should NOT be thinking about getting an iguana. If you are still thinking of one, then its time to start reading. I've included below a couple of really good links, and i suggest you read them ALL of the way through BEFORE getting an iguana.

If you are serious, then you'll understand that a lot of research is needed before homing one, and you'll also understand that its not a case of "I want, therefore i'll go and buy"... I had to wait years AFTER i felt comfortable enough in my research to get an iguana, before i finally brought one home. I believe that if you are serious, you will rehome instead of buying, and there might not always be one to offer a home to. However one will come along eventually (as said i waited years on one that i felt was right) and when it does, if you've done your research, it will be the most rewarding animal you'll ever have the pleasure of looking after. I will not say "Pet" or "keeping" for reasons you'll surely understand by now

Hope i was of some help. Here is a couple of links for you to also check out. Lynda










The other sections
taming tips, vet expiriences and help finding a vet are all open to discussion, you are all welcome to add to this as you see fit, please do not make this an argument, this has been discussed with other iguana owners for your animals benefit not ours,
if you would like to criticise me lmao then my pm box is open


AND NOW OPEN FOR DISCUSSION
Also this information has been gatherd from numerouse websites I posted the links whereever possible
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Old 20-03-2011, 07:17 PM
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Please note - Iguana Sneezing

If you notice that your Iguana is sneezing please be reminded that this may and generally is not a sign if illness. Iguana's rid their body of by products through this method.


"Nasal salt glands are present in herbivorous iguanid lizards such as the green iguana. When the plasma osmotic concentration is high, excessive sodium is excreted by these glands. The lizard may be seen to sneeze a clear fluid that dries to a fine, white powder, which is sodium chloride. This mechanism allows water conservation and may be mistaken for an upper respiratory infection.

If you have introduced a new food item into the diet and notice that your Iguana is "snalting" more often than before, please refrain from feeding that particular food item for a few weeks. If after a few weeks you notice that the snalting has reduced then re-introduce the food item in smaller quantities.

If you wish to remove the snalt deposits from your Iguana please take care and use a damp cloth. As stated as above, Iguanas will choose their moment wisely to bite.

Cleaning the snalt from the glass is a little harder, therefore you may want to use an ANIMAL SAFE detergent.

Please ensure also that there are no infections within the mouth of your Iguana, and a safe method of inspection is simply wait till they yawn. Clearly yo should be looking for all the teeth (of which there are a lot). and no obvious signs of infection.... If you believe that anything is out of the ordinary please consult a vet.

VET - Please ensure that you have proper access to a trained reptile vet! DO NOT wait till you Iguana becomes ill, Iguana's deteriorate rapidly therefore it is crucial that you are able to gain access to a vet!


IF YOU CAN'T AFFORD A VET DO NOT PURCHASE/AQUIRE AN IGUANA large lizard = large bills!

Last edited by Iguanaquinn; 20-03-2011 at 07:24 PM..
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Old 20-03-2011, 07:25 PM
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May i be so bold to suggest that you get this moved to the CARE SHEET sub section, with it being a care sheet and all.

It is a very nice peice and it would be a shame for it to get lost into the sea of crap that always floats to the bottom of the page then into obscurity.

At least if its in the care sheet section it won't get lost forever and it can be found easier
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Old 20-03-2011, 07:27 PM
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Originally Posted by ginnerone View Post
May i be so bold to suggest that you get this moved to the CARE SHEET sub section, with it being a care sheet and all.

It is a very nice peice and it would be a shame for it to get lost into the sea of crap that always floats to the bottom of the page then into obscurity.

At least if its in the care sheet section it won't get lost forever and it can be found easier
indeed beleive it or not however I tried that and my laptop won't let me click that for some reason? well mods feel free
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If you buy only one book on nutrition.
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http://www.arcadia-reptile.com/nutrition-guide/
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Old 20-03-2011, 07:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Salazare Slytherin View Post
indeed beleive it or not however I tried that and my laptop won't let me click that for some reason? well mods feel free
have a look see which ones are online mate and drop them a PM, it would be a shame to lose it all as it looks like a very indepth and informative caresheet, which i might add, all care sheets should be rather than just basic info, the more info the better imo so well done mate.
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