Go Back   Reptile Forums > Help and Chat > Snakes



  #1 (permalink)  
Old 15-03-2009, 04:05 PM
Regular
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Redcar, Cleveland, North East.
Posts: 139
Default Pine snake care sheet :) (inc.Gohper, Bull)

Physical appearance:

All three species listed above are large bodied snakes with generally similar markings and slightly keeled dorsal scales. These snakes have a background color that ranges from reddish orange to tan to yellow with dark blotches on the back, with obvious exceptions. The snakes length generally is about 6-8 feet in length. They are powerfully built snakes and can appear intimidating (as well as HEAR intimidating) if you do not know your snake. The head is somewhat small and pointed.

Habitat & tank requirements:


The snake Prefers pine flatwoods, sandy pine-oak woodlands (<-- hence PINE snake ), prairies, cultivated fields, open brushland and rocky desert. A typically sized snake would need a 20-gallon or larger aquarium with a secure top and larger specimens may require a larger enclosure, which is common sense really.
A temperature gradient of 75° - 85° F should be setup for these snakes. Temperatures may be allowed to fall closer to 75° F at night and heating can be Under tank heaters (heat mats), red heat bulbs, ceramic emitters, or basking bulbs can all be used to provide enough heat for these snakes. As for UV light, It has still not been proven that snakes require any source of UV light and will generally do well without it. Many of these species like to burrow so providing substrate such as potting soil, aspen shavings, cypress mulch or ground coconut fibers can provide excellent substrates which also allow for burrowing as well as looking great! I use simple wood chips for mine from the pet store.

They will also occasionally climb trees, so if cage space allows for branches you will often find your snakes taking advantage of the higher space. It is important to provide a hide box or enough rocks to allow the snake to feel secure and out of view - as will many snakes.

Diet:

Like most other snakes, members of Pituophis (pine snakes) thrive on mice and rats. We recommend pre-killed frozen prey since it will help eliminate possible injury to the snake from the prey animal as well as kill most parasites. Meal sizes should be proportionate to the size of the snake. Hatchlings can be started on pinkies. All snakes can generally be fed once every seven to 10 days. These snakes can also eat chickens(larger snakes), moles (although have not tried), fresh eggs, gerbils and hamsters. There has been some accounts that pine snakes prefer eggs and chickens and will NOT revert to rodents after they have tried the best, so i have stayed on the safe side and stuch to rats, mice and gerbils



Maintenance:



Fresh water should be offered daily. Spot clean as needed if using newsprint or wood shavings. The enclosure should also be disinfected periodically. A 5% bleach solution makes an excellent disinfectant, or you're average reptile disinfectant bought for any decent pet store... Be sure to rinse the enclosure thoroughly after disinfecting. As always, be sure to wash your hands thoroughly after handling your snake or any cage accessories.




Oh, and here's mine





__________________
1.0.0 North American Pine (Baldrick)
0.1.0 Carolina Corn (Jassy)
1.0.0 Snow Corn (Silas)
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 15-03-2009, 06:25 PM
ipsilon's Avatar
Ultra Citizen
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Brighton
Posts: 1,623
Default

Should be in the caresheets section
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grond View Post
Is Lestat what you use for keeping Leviv at the right temp........

Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 27-06-2009, 10:57 AM
mrhoyo's Avatar
5 Star Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Halifax, West Yorkshire
Posts: 3,652
Reviews: 10
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz View Post
Physical appearance:

All three species listed above are large bodied snakes with generally similar markings and slightly keeled dorsal scales. These snakes have a background color that ranges from reddish orange to tan to yellow with dark blotches on the back, with obvious exceptions. The snakes length generally is about 6-8 feet in length. They are powerfully built snakes and can appear intimidating (as well as HEAR intimidating) if you do not know your snake. The head is somewhat small and pointed.

Habitat & tank requirements:


The snake Prefers pine flatwoods, sandy pine-oak woodlands (<-- hence PINE snake ), prairies, cultivated fields, open brushland and rocky desert. A typically sized snake would need a 20-gallon or larger aquarium with a secure top and larger specimens may require a larger enclosure, which is common sense really.
A temperature gradient of 75° - 85° F should be setup for these snakes. Temperatures may be allowed to fall closer to 75° F at night and heating can be Under tank heaters (heat mats), red heat bulbs, ceramic emitters, or basking bulbs can all be used to provide enough heat for these snakes. As for UV light, It has still not been proven that snakes require any source of UV light and will generally do well without it. Many of these species like to burrow so providing substrate such as potting soil, aspen shavings, cypress mulch or ground coconut fibers can provide excellent substrates which also allow for burrowing as well as looking great! I use simple wood chips for mine from the pet store.

They will also occasionally climb trees, so if cage space allows for branches you will often find your snakes taking advantage of the higher space. It is important to provide a hide box or enough rocks to allow the snake to feel secure and out of view - as will many snakes.

Diet:

Like most other snakes, members of Pituophis (pine snakes) thrive on mice and rats. We recommend pre-killed frozen prey since it will help eliminate possible injury to the snake from the prey animal as well as kill most parasites. Meal sizes should be proportionate to the size of the snake. Hatchlings can be started on pinkies. All snakes can generally be fed once every seven to 10 days. These snakes can also eat chickens(larger snakes), moles (although have not tried), fresh eggs, gerbils and hamsters. There has been some accounts that pine snakes prefer eggs and chickens and will NOT revert to rodents after they have tried the best, so i have stayed on the safe side and stuch to rats, mice and gerbils



Maintenance:



Fresh water should be offered daily. Spot clean as needed if using newsprint or wood shavings. The enclosure should also be disinfected periodically. A 5% bleach solution makes an excellent disinfectant, or you're average reptile disinfectant bought for any decent pet store... Be sure to rinse the enclosure thoroughly after disinfecting. As always, be sure to wash your hands thoroughly after handling your snake or any cage accessories.




Oh, and here's mine





loving the copy and paste from Kaplan's caresheet
Koitoi likes this.
__________________


Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 23-02-2010, 11:10 PM
DragonFish66's Avatar
Premier Member
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: North West Cumbria
Posts: 7,275
Default

Good care sheet i will be picking a pair of these up soon cant wait there does not seem to be many people keeping these great snakes
__________________


2.3x Leopard Geckos 4.3x Corns 1.0x Northern Pine 1.1x Hse Snakes 1.0x Bci 0.1x Royal Python 1.1.1 Cresties 1.0 Rectic 1.0 Djj Cp 0.1 Jcp 1.0 Hognose
And Lots Of African Land Snails!!!

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Drago...39954372793210

http://www.reptileforums.co.uk/forum...l#post11979061
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 24-02-2010, 05:05 AM
Premier Citizen
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 2,322
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamz View Post
Physical appearance:

The snakes length generally is about 6-8 feet in length.

Habitat & tank requirements:

A typically sized snake would need a 20-gallon or larger aquarium with a secure top and larger specimens may require a larger enclosure, which is common sense really.
Most of these snakes are sexually mature at a length of four feet, with a range of five to seven feet common for older adults. The bullsnake grows the largest, with a record length of over 8 feet.

Minimum cage floor area is equal to half the snake's length times a quarter the snake's length.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 24-04-2010, 10:09 PM
Boon's Avatar
Super Regular
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Durham, NE
Posts: 287
Reviews: 17
Post

Quite clearly an obvious copy and paste job :
Gopher, Bull & Pine Snakes Care Sheet | My Vivariums
__________________
Better to be safe than sorry...





Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
wanted bull snake care sheet JBJcool Snake Care Sheets 11 24-11-2010 12:43 AM
bull, pine of gopher snake wanted mattsdragons Snake Classifieds 5 17-12-2009 08:58 AM
3 corns, 1 black pine, 1 bull snake - kent angela831 Snake Classifieds 18 01-06-2009 04:38 PM
!! Wanted !! Care sheet for a Northern pine!! Bobby D Snake Care Sheets 1 16-03-2009 06:49 PM
Pine/Bull snake question The Wanderer Snakes 3 15-07-2008 09:04 PM


Help For Heros

All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:22 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright © 2005 - 2011, Reptile Forums (RFUK™)
Privacy Policy