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Old 10-05-2018, 09:55 AM
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Default Tuatara breeding

I absolutely love the Tuatara but as these are endangered, will probably never own one.

I wonder though, if these were allowed to be kept as pets, the resultant demand for them would mean large breeding programs that would allow an endangered species to recover.

Thoughts?
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sharkbait View Post
I absolutely love the Tuatara but as these are endangered, will probably never own one.

I wonder though, if these were allowed to be kept as pets, the resultant demand for them would mean large breeding programs that would allow an endangered species to recover.

Thoughts?
Unlikely. They have a gestation period of around 2 years if I remember rightly and only lay a couple of eggs. So highly unlikely to lead to a large breeding programme. Then the inevitable of animals appearing on the market as "captive farmed" aka wild caught, leading to significant decline in the wild population.
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Old 29-05-2018, 01:05 PM
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Purely from a conversational point of view, I seen an article about a year ago written by a guy from (I am sure it was Southland Museum) in New Zealand where he reported tremendous results from their Tuatara Breeding Programme - there was a real desire to release some of these captive bred animals back into the wild.

Unfortunately, the authorities were less than keen / supportive of this, so much so that they faced the very real possibility of suppressing the breeding programme.



Releasing captive bred animals back into the wild is the ultimate objective of many breeding projects. Unfortunately, this is a very long and labour intensive process - even several years after the actual release - and one which requires the support and commitment of so many different individuals and organisations. Lets not forget, one of the biggest issues is that in many cases the problem which caused the decline in the first place (be it loss of habitat, poaching, pollution etc etc) has not been addressed to the extent that releasing animals back into the wild is a viable or beneficial proposition.

I wrote an article on this very subject for a magazine (they chose not to publish it), here is an extract from this article:

'The Axolotl – Ambystoma mexicanum found in the Xochimilco region of Mexico in an area no bigger than 10 square kilometers. This region supplies most of Mexico City with ‘fresh’ drinking water, unfortunately for the Axolotl (and i suppose the humans also), water quality has reduced to such a level that these amphibians simply can’t survive. This coupled with the introduction of non native fish species has meant that this popular pet is listed as being critically endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. This species has a remarkable ability in that it can regenerate lost limbs, if only it could regenerate a lost environment!! By default, if the quality of drinking water for some 23 million people is improved so too is the long-term survival of the axolotl. In all honesty though, if the desire to improve the quality of human drinking water can’t be realised, what hope is there to persuade a nation that they should improve the water quality for this unusual amphibian?'
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