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Old 13-06-2018, 09:56 PM
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Default Restocking outdoor pond

Hello!

We have a large fish pond that until recently had 13 large carp in (at least 20 yrs old plus thousands of smaller fish). Sadly a prolonged cold period resulted in all the big fish dying and I would like to replace them - does anyone have any advice on whether it is a good idea replacing like-for-like (13 new big fish) or would it be better to get a smaller number of a few different sizes to restore and balance between the fish in there?

I am aware that some of the smaller fish are likely to be baby carp but nothing obvious has grown up in their place in the past year or 2.

Thanks!
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Old 14-06-2018, 12:52 PM
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Default Restocking outdoor pond

Well ...

I'm not experienced enough with cold water fish to RECOMMEND these but do LOVE the look of the Albino Sturgeon

They may grow to large but they are sold alongside Koi Carp ..




The normal dark ones are also stunning but I'm not sure you'd see much of them in a pond . The albinos do stand out though .


Also those Golden Tench are stunning as well but again maybe not ideal as Tench are pretty shy and bottom feeders I think !?!



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Old 14-06-2018, 12:58 PM
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What are the dimensions, plus of course depth?
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Old 14-06-2018, 09:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zincubus View Post
Well ...

I'm not experienced enough with cold water fish to RECOMMEND these but do LOVE the look of the Albino Sturgeon

They may grow to large but they are sold alongside Koi Carp ..

image


The normal dark ones are also stunning but I'm not sure you'd see much of them in a pond . The albinos do stand out though .


Also those Golden Tench are stunning as well but again maybe not ideal as Tench are pretty shy and bottom feeders I think !?!

image

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Thank you for the suggestions! The sturgeons do look very nice. I think we will have to stick to more camouflaged fish to avoid heron attacks however as it is not protected.


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Old 14-06-2018, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Shellsfeathers&fur View Post
What are the dimensions, plus of course depth?


Iíd say itís about half an acre in surface area? Really couldnít tell you the dimensions Iím afraid but Iíve added a pic with me (5í10) as a size reference for width and then itís pretty long. Behind me in the photo it loops around the corner into a bigger pool area. There is about 5ft of water depth and probably 3-4ft of mud underneath that.

Itís a natural pond, no filtering or anything like that beyond plants covering the bottom and some lilly pads. I believe it was originally dug out in the 50ís and kept as a trout farm but by the time we moved in it had only a few trout & pike left (which were fished out/died off quite quickly). The fish that were left were these amazing big carp so Iíd really like to get back to having a few large fish in there for added interest. Nothing seems to have grown up to fill the gap since the big ones died. We feed them daily but to be honest there are probably so many small fish in there that a scoop of fish pellets isnít going to be helping so much.

Another idea is to build a much smaller pond (2m cubed?) and grow a few fish up in there (regular feeding etc) so I can feed them up then move them into the bigger pond? But Iím not sure whether itís a great ecosystem to have thousands of babies and just a few that are so much bigger - that seems to have been what we had and when the big ones died they havenít been able to fill the gap...



This is the size of the big ones:



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Old 14-06-2018, 10:57 PM
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That's a flamin lake !!



It's catch 22 .... If you have dark coloured fish you'll they won't get eaten as fast but you'll never see them but Koi and any albino or Golden fish will be glorious to see but easier prey ...


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Old 18-06-2018, 12:25 AM
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In a pond/lake like the one you have, you have so many options when it comes to stocking it.

Sturgeon wouldn't be very suitable as they prefer waters with high oxygen levels.

The golden tench that Zincubus suggested would be perfect, but as said previously, your not very likely to ever see them as they are bottom feeders, but don't be put off by this as they can be very benaficial to a pond. They also come in green, blue and koi.

Koi and mirror carp would be a good fit, as you would be able to see them from the surface, and as long as you got some decent sized ones the herrons would leave them well alone.
The same goes for common and mirror carp although you wouldn't have to get them as big, as they won't be as visable from the surface.

Grass carp is another option, they get to a fair size too and also come in albino form, but again if you want albinos try getting them at a larger size.

Bream can get quite large, and can be seen swimming in shoals from the surface on sunny days.

You say that you also have a lot of small fish in the pond, so you might want to add some predators to keep the smaller fish in check and stop your pond from becoming over populated.

I would suggest perch and/or chub, both do really well in ponds and will only eat the smaller fish in the pond.

Other species you could have include

Ide
Golden Orfe (ornamental Ide)
Blue Orfe (Ornamental Ide)
Koi Orfe (ornamental ide)
Roach
Rud

You could also add a couple of jack pike (male Pike). Jacks are a fair bit smaller than the bigger females Rarley reaching 10lb in weight, pike eat between 1.2 - 1.5 times there own body weight a year, and a jacks diet mainly consists of smaller fish ( rud, roach and perch, they also help control the sick and injured fish that you may have in your pond.
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Old 18-06-2018, 12:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious D View Post
In a pond/lake like the one you have, you have so many options when it comes to stocking it.



Sturgeon wouldn't be very suitable as they prefer waters with high oxygen levels.



The golden tench that Zincubus suggested would be perfect, but as said previously, your not very likely to ever see them as they are bottom feeders, but don't be put off by this as they can be very benaficial to a pond. They also come in green, blue and koi.



Koi and mirror carp would be a good fit, as you would be able to see them from the surface, and as long as you got some decent sized ones the herrons would leave them well alone.

The same goes for common and mirror carp although you wouldn't have to get them as big, as they won't be as visable from the surface.



Grass carp is another option, they get to a fair size too and also come in albino form, but again if you want albinos try getting them at a larger size.



Bream can get quite large, and can be seen swimming in shoals from the surface on sunny days.



You say that you also have a lot of small fish in the pond, so you might want to add some predators to keep the smaller fish in check and stop your pond from becoming over populated.



I would suggest perch and/or chub, both do really well in ponds and will only eat the smaller fish in the pond.



Other species you could have include



Ide

Golden Orfe (ornamental Ide)

Blue Orfe (Ornamental Ide)

Koi Orfe (ornamental ide)

Roach

Rud



You could also add a couple of jack pike (male Pike). Jacks are a fair bit smaller than the bigger females Rarley reaching 10lb in weight, pike eat between 1.2 - 1.5 times there own body weight a year, and a jacks diet mainly consists of smaller fish ( rud, roach and perch, they also help control the sick and injured fish that you may have in your pond.


Great post !!!

Is that correct that Pike only eat just a bit more than their body weight a YEAR !?

I thought they'd decimate a lake pronto ..

I actually saw two ( a pair ?) decent sized Pike swimming together along a very narrow and shallow stream last weekend .. I've only ever seen them as a solitary figure in the past and always just stationary .


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Old 18-06-2018, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Great post !!!

Is that correct that Pike only eat just a bit more than their body weight a YEAR !?

I thought they'd decimate a lake pronto ..

I actually saw two ( a pair ?) decent sized Pike swimming together along a very narrow and shallow stream last weekend .. I've only ever seen them as a solitary figure in the past and always just stationary .
Yes it's true male pike only need to consume a little over there body weight a year, females tend to eat 2.5 - 3 times there own body weight as they get substatualy larger reaching weights up to over 40lb.

In the warmer months pike will actively Hunt in open water as well as stalk the shallows, this time of year is when they do most of there feeding. Feeding on anything from insects, fish, frogs, toads, newts, mice and even bats. Larger pike will even take rats and ducklings.

In the winter months pike don't need to eat as much, as they become more slow and lethargic, So to conserve energy they'll stop chasing down prey and instead they'll seek out sick, dead or dying fish.

Pike are very solitary as you say. Usually only coming together for spawning between February and April, they are also very territorial and will not tolerate other pike in there swims, smaller pike may even be eaten for doing so.

So it's very uncommon for pike to be seen swimming togeather, I have seen it myself and I have spoken to others that have witnessed this behaviour.

I'm wondering was it really hot on the day you witnessed this behaviour?

As when I and others saw this behaviour it was when we had very warm weather, and at a guess we think it may have been due to lack of oxygen in the water, either way It was very interesting to see.
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Old 18-06-2018, 05:11 PM
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Wow that is massive! Are you still in Wandsworth?

Make it escape proof (or part of it) and it would make a super turtle pond - they would love those tree branches for basking.
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