Known and potential genetic defects in morphs! - Page 7 - Reptile Forums

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  #61 (permalink)  
Old 12-01-2013, 09:27 AM
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funny you should say that eeji i have been working with the lavender morph for 2 years now and have only had one kinked baby like you say it could just be different bloodlines
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  #62 (permalink)  
Old 07-02-2016, 11:59 PM
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List of genetic defects/mutations in reptile morphs (from research on the internet, so some things may not be true):

BALL PYTHONS
Spider genes: any spider morph ball may suffer from mild to severe wobbles and thought to be lethal in homozygous form (doubling of the gene).
Woma and Hidden Gene Woma: Wobbles
Champagne: Wobble
Super Sable: Wobble
Powerball: Wobble
Sable x Spider: severe wobbles and difficulty hatching
Champagne x Spider: Lethal gene
Spider x Woma: Lethal
Champagne x Hidden Gene Woma: Severe Wobbles
Pearl: often times lethal
Super Champagne: lethal
Desert: fertility issues in the females
Caramel Albino: lower fertility in females and kinking
Super Cinnamon/Super Black Pastel: Duckbill and more rarely kinking
Super Lesser Platinum/Super Butter: bug-eyes
Lesser Platinum x Piebald: Small eyes
Banana/Coral Glow: the males may produce weird gender ratios
Albino: Associated with eye problems, inbreeding, and perhaps lowered immunity.
Blue Eyed Lucy: they may develop bug-eyes
Lavender: in some blood-lines their may be kinking

FAT-TAILED GECKO
Super White-out: Lethal
Albino: Linked with neurological conditions in some species of animal, as well as blindness and skin cancer

RED-EARED SLIDER
Pastel: scute deformities, said to be sensitive and prone to early deaths
Albino: Sight issues, trouble feeding, and said to be more sensitive. With no melanin it may be more difficult to thermoregulate and filter UV light.

BOA CONSTRICTOR
Motley to Motley/Super Motley: Usually die around 1-2 years of age
Albino to Albino: some may have deformed litters
Super Jungle/Arabesque: prone to early death, weak livers, and infertility
Super Aztec: seem to suffer from lack of coordination
Blizzard: many blizzards seem to suffer from a lethal gene

HONDURAN MILK SNAKE
Extreme hypo: possibly a lethal gene and enlarged heart

TEXAS RAT SNAKE
Leucistic: some have bug-eyes

CARPET PYTHON
Jaguar: Neurological issues similar to spider puthons
Super Jag/Ivory: Lethal
Granite: inbred individuals are often deformed

CORN SNAKES
Caramel: Enlarged heart, weakness and sudden death
Striped: Enlarged heart, weakness and sudden death
Sunkissed: prone to stargazing, though this is seen in other morphs as well
Amel/Albino: as stated with the others, known to cause issues in other species and sight problems
Two-headed: besides the obvious, they are unable to behave freely and naturally
Scaless: while not degrading, there have been those who say snakes cannot behave as naturally and need special care (like with a hairless mammal)

LEOPARD GECKO
Enigma: Star gazing, circling, head shaking and head tilt, coordination problems, and sometimes death rolling
Line-bred snow: possible lethal
Gem Snow: possible lethal
TUG Snow: possible lethal

CRESTED GECKO
Polydactly: extra toes

BEARDED DRAGONS
Silkback: can more easily get burned and during breeding get torn skin, can't filter UV rays properly, difficulty shedding, also said to have eye problems and have difficulty thriving
Dunner: said to have eating problems
Short-snout/Pug dragon: large head, short snout, bug eyes, short-snouts can be related to breathing and bone issues in other species
......
Some strains of beardies are said to be more prone to airway issues and aggression

There are possibly others but hours of research turned up these. Feel free to add to this as I am very interested in the genetic variety of pet animals, their health, and behavior.

Hope this helps someone. : )
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  #63 (permalink)  
Old 07-01-2017, 05:46 PM
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Sorry if this has already been mentioned, I did a skim, but have been reading all day so it's not all going in any more. Thought I'd bring up an idea I had during the reading (I'm aware that no-one has commented on this thread in nearly a year.

I've had a thought regarding how to add evidence for/against the lethality of the homogeneous spider gene without any need physical genetics testing - this would require a HUGE amount of data, possibly worthy of a little project between BHB, NERD, Bob Clark, etc. and any other interest data scientist (i'd happily do it if the data was readily available) but would rely on them all having the data to hand, and digitised, so here it is - if the homozygous form of spider leads to unviable offspring then the results should show in their slug numbers, unhatched eggs, or by clutch sizes compared with all other breedings.

For Spider-to-Spider breedings, statistically speaking the clutch sizes should be 3/4 of the size of any or all other clutches, given that 1/4 of the offspring (on average) would be unviable, IF the Homozygous form is lethal.

You'd need huge datasets for this as the typical clutch size is ~6 eggs, and your variance on this (as well as on the subset relating specifically to spider-to-spider) would need to be small enough that you could confidently confirm a hypothesis either way.

I'm unaware of anyone having done this, but doing such a level of statistical analysis across the entire breeding industry would also allow us as a community to assess whether there are any other genetic dispositions to lethality too (e.g. HG Woma).

Going further still, one could go into e.g. adult weights/lengths, head diameters, male-to-female offspring ratios, to test whether specific morphs have a more voracious appetite, 'duckbill', male/female-maker tendencies too - though some of these are a given from experience.
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  #64 (permalink)  
Old 08-01-2017, 09:16 PM
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Testing is so important, and I feel as if there isn't enough of that with reptiles. Sort of like people don't care as much as they do with other types of pet animals. I can't wait to see how things progress in the future as more studies on their genetics and health as well as behavior are done.
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  #65 (permalink)  
Old 08-01-2017, 09:42 PM
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I agree; there will always be those with unscrupulous tendencies, but we really don't want to see the breeding of our magnificent animals going the way of many KC registered dog breeds - animal welfare should come before anything else, and some money should be going into genetic testing - maybe the guys at Heli-Gen are working on it?
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1.0 CB14 Cinnamon Lesser Royal Python - Lorentz
0.1 CB16 Enchi Lesser Pastel Royal Python Rubin
0.1 CB16 HG Woma Granite Royal Python As yet un-named
55G Planted tropical tank with community fish - shutting down
Planted shrimp tank (iwagumi - under construction)
Exo-Terra 45-cube, planted (awaiting occupant)
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  #66 (permalink)  
Old 08-01-2017, 10:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jh2o View Post
I agree; there will always be those with unscrupulous tendencies, but we really don't want to see the breeding of our magnificent animals going the way of many KC registered dog breeds - animal welfare should come before anything else, and some money should be going into genetic testing - maybe the guys at Heli-Gen are working on it?

SOOOO agree. I study genetic defects caused by "Show Breeding" and inbreeding in dogs, cats, ect and so I'm so glad reptiles aren't at that point. It's hard to fix dogs; it's far easier to just avoid bad things from happening in the first place through responsible breeding.
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  #67 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2017, 09:41 AM
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Does anyone know of any problems with leopard gene? IE males or females not being able to breed?
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