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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2017, 05:52 PM
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Default Bio active lights

Hi just would like some advice as Iím changing to a bio active set up and at the moment and have white python led lights which are just white light, I already use them for my sterile set up and have no complaints with them at all. I believe these are ok for bio active but will not support plants. However my friend is really convinced that they will support plants. Can someone help clear this up and if my friend is correct what plants are they and are they also reptile safe? In the future I will consider uvb but if it is possible to add some kind of plant at this stage that would be great, even if I have to let my mate know he was right?!! Any help would be great thanks
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Old 08-12-2017, 11:50 PM
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Duno if it would support plants. The jugle dawn is your best bet but if you need a longer bulb as there just normal sized then id use the arcadia aquatic freshwater pro ones. I use them to go over 2 tanks at a time 45cm each. Saves plugs and money on bills. The tanks that they are on are doing well. I do have 12% t8s on them as well mind. Swell aquatics stock them tho good luck with there stocks. Aquadabra ive used as well to get them. There good.
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Old 19-12-2017, 10:22 AM
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This is quite simple to answer.

Plants need water, food, airflow and access to light of the correct wavelengths and 'energy' to be able to photosynthesise. It is photosynthesis that causes cellular repair i.e growth. We call the 'energy' behind light 'PAR' or 'photosynthetically Active Radiation'

If we underprovide any of the above we limit growth.

In terms of light, the energy contained within light that is usable for plants MUST contain the whole terrestrially 'visible' available spectrum, from blue to red. If we match the colour of 'daylight' with good quality 'full-spectrum' diodes of 5500-6500 kelvin we will be assured of the spectrum.

Then we have to have quantity of light as it is 'Spectrum + Quantity = PAR'

The greater the PAR the more sustained the growth.

So, LEDs are a fantastic light source in terms of providing visible light but they can be very much PAR poor. Especially when laid out as a strip. What you get then is thin columns of light, each covering a small area to its own level of energy.

If we group diodes together then the energy multiplies as the quantity of light increases over a flood. This is the way to increase PAR.

Energy from light is contained with it photons. Imagine trillions of tiny packages of energy bursting out from your lamp, each one bouncing around and splashing onto anything that it interacts with. As its does, it 'delivers' this energy into the thing it touches. The more energy it contains the better fuelled the 'thing' is. This applies to UV, IR and visible light in their own ways.

So, what you need is to stay away from linear LED lighting. I.e if you have thin strips of LEDs and especially from a non-descript colour 'cool white/warm white' they cant possibly provide the PAR that is needed.

If you see Red or Blue diodes stay WELL CLEAR, this is very old and failed thinking. Yes plants use red and blue but only as part of a balanced 'Full-Spectrum'. We do not have a multitude of suns do we? one for each colour..No, we followed wild development and match that. We cant go wrong then.

Anyway, hope this helps.

to answer your question, will a strip of LEDs cause fantastic plant growth for long periods? Nope... its just not possible, not unless you had a full-spectrum diode of sufficient output and placed one tiny plant per diode .
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Old 19-12-2017, 03:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcadiajohn View Post
This is quite simple to answer.

Plants need water, food, airflow and access to light of the correct wavelengths and 'energy' to be able to photosynthesise. It is photosynthesis that causes cellular repair i.e growth. We call the 'energy' behind light 'PAR' or 'photosynthetically Active Radiation'

If we underprovide any of the above we limit growth.

In terms of light, the energy contained within light that is usable for plants MUST contain the whole terrestrially 'visible' available spectrum, from blue to red. If we match the colour of 'daylight' with good quality 'full-spectrum' diodes of 5500-6500 kelvin we will be assured of the spectrum.

Then we have to have quantity of light as it is 'Spectrum + Quantity = PAR'

The greater the PAR the more sustained the growth.

So, LEDs are a fantastic light source in terms of providing visible light but they can be very much PAR poor. Especially when laid out as a strip. What you get then is thin columns of light, each covering a small area to its own level of energy.

If we group diodes together then the energy multiplies as the quantity of light increases over a flood. This is the way to increase PAR.

Energy from light is contained with it photons. Imagine trillions of tiny packages of energy bursting out from your lamp, each one bouncing around and splashing onto anything that it interacts with. As its does, it 'delivers' this energy into the thing it touches. The more energy it contains the better fuelled the 'thing' is. This applies to UV, IR and visible light in their own ways.

So, what you need is to stay away from linear LED lighting. I.e if you have thin strips of LEDs and especially from a non-descript colour 'cool white/warm white' they cant possibly provide the PAR that is needed.

If you see Red or Blue diodes stay WELL CLEAR, this is very old and failed thinking. Yes plants use red and blue but only as part of a balanced 'Full-Spectrum'. We do not have a multitude of suns do we? one for each colour..No, we followed wild development and match that. We cant go wrong then.

Anyway, hope this helps.

to answer your question, will a strip of LEDs cause fantastic plant growth for long periods? Nope... its just not possible, not unless you had a full-spectrum diode of sufficient output and placed one tiny plant per diode .
Why do linear aquatic LEDs produce strong growth?
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Old 19-12-2017, 05:08 PM
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Because aquatic plants have a lower PAR requirement than terrestrial plants and light 'bends' through a prism, changing its V value through water.

As such water causes a point source to 'flood' in water whereas it stats a spot in air,

cool physics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Deeman View Post
Why do linear aquatic LEDs produce strong growth?
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Arcadia Reptile; Head of Science and Innovation

BRAND NEW BOOK out now. The Elements series; Part 1- FIRE, The Sun, its Use and Replication in Reptile Keeping

Find us on facebook under "Arcadia reptile"
www.arcadiareptile.com
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Old 20-12-2017, 08:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcadiajohn View Post
Because aquatic plants have a lower PAR requirement than terrestrial plants and light 'bends' through a prism, changing its V value through water.

As such water causes a point source to 'flood' in water whereas it stats a spot in air,

cool physics.
Thanks John. I thought it was something like that.
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Old 21-12-2017, 03:00 PM
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This is the growth from one of the bulbs i mentioned. I do have a 12% t8 also running.
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