UK livefood rip-off - Page 2 - Reptile Forums

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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 27-03-2017, 09:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colinm View Post
As someone else said. It's economies of scale. Far more tonnes of beef are produced than mealworms.

Have you just come on here to moan , looking at this thread and the other about Exo Terras?
It is always good to have a moan to get things off your chest. Also good to publicise some facts.
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 28-03-2017, 08:56 AM
huh
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Location: UK
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my local farm shop sells dried meal worms for £35 for 5kg (including VAT)
... £7 for 1kg
... 70p for 100g
£2.80 for 400g - does this bag of dead insects, more or less, match your pack of dead meat?

some other things to consider:
- supermarket 'value meat' might be a loss leader?
- is meat farming for human consumption subsidized?
- better cuts or fillet or sirloin probably cost a fair bit more per kg than value meat
- live meal worms contain every 'cut'
- there is no VAT on food in the supermarket
- probably more households in the UK buying meat from the supermarket than there are households with reptiles, economies of scale
- reptiles are a luxury product (see Apple or Porche for pricing of luxury items)
- (good) reptile shops are there to educate people

Mealworms are pretty easy to breed with a little bit of research and time, probably easier than bringing a live cow home and popping it in the garden and then trying to figure out why you can't have just the occasional steak from it.

What is surprizing is the price of dried mealworms that are sold as fit for human consumption. Compare that to the 'bird food grade' priced above.

Alternatively equally bonkers things to complain about ...
- 6x (good quality, nice flavor) apples = £2.50
- price of an apple tree ... which might last 100 years!
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 29-03-2017, 09:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcap View Post
my local farm shop sells dried meal worms for £35 for 5kg (including VAT)
... £7 for 1kg
... 70p for 100g
£2.80 for 400g - does this bag of dead insects, more or less, match your pack of dead meat?

some other things to consider:
- supermarket 'value meat' might be a loss leader?
- is meat farming for human consumption subsidized?
- better cuts or fillet or sirloin probably cost a fair bit more per kg than value meat
- live meal worms contain every 'cut'
- there is no VAT on food in the supermarket
- probably more households in the UK buying meat from the supermarket than there are households with reptiles, economies of scale
- reptiles are a luxury product (see Apple or Porche for pricing of luxury items)
- (good) reptile shops are there to educate people

Mealworms are pretty easy to breed with a little bit of research and time, probably easier than bringing a live cow home and popping it in the garden and then trying to figure out why you can't have just the occasional steak from it.

What is surprizing is the price of dried mealworms that are sold as fit for human consumption. Compare that to the 'bird food grade' priced above.

Alternatively equally bonkers things to complain about ...
- 6x (good quality, nice flavor) apples = £2.50
- price of an apple tree ... which might last 100 years!
Mealworms at 70p for 100g = 35p for 50g seems quite reasonable in comparison to what live mealworms for reptile use cost.
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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 14-05-2018, 07:25 AM
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Credit where credit is due. Must take my hat off to Monkfield who in the last few months since opening their new facility are producing top rank European standard Locust. Currently adult boxes are arriving with 8 or 9 alive and surviving several days. XL/5 getting up to 13 alive in some boxes and again living a decent length of times. Alas still some improvement needed for Crickets which are much better from Peregrine.
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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 17-05-2018, 01:41 PM
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Surely the point is they can charge what they want? If you don't like it produce your own - simples!!

As with most things, we pay for convenience - I enjoy a Latte and slice of Cake while in town and I don't get much change out of £5.00. The alternative is to make my own Latte and buy a box of ready made cakes - in the long run I could save a small fortune but I choose not to.
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 17-05-2018, 11:25 PM
Egg
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I have pondered this subject and here are some of my thoughts.

The cost of livefoods for the reptile market have changed very little in the last 30 plus years. Bargains can be found but generally the price has stayed at around £2 per tub while the quantity of crickets per tub has gone down the quantity of locusts contained per tub has increased probably due to the locusts taking over as the best selling livefood.

When they talk about cheap insect production I assume they are talking mainly about production in warmer countries here in the UK the cost of heating is a huge chunk of the production cost possibly even higher than the cost of the labour required.

Livefoods are difficult and costly to distribute here in the Uk due to the constantly changing weather and can involve the livefoods changing hands many times before they are sold in the retail outlets. Each level of distribution has to make a profit and this adds to the over all cost.

As a food for human consumption i assume that bugs would not have the 20 percent VAT added to them that livefood sales do.

Production for human consumption would most likely involve the insects immediately being killed and processed into a powdered or freeze dried form that would greatly reduce the cost of storage and distribution.
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 26-05-2018, 09:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin Farndell View Post
I have pondered this subject and here are some of my thoughts.

The cost of livefoods for the reptile market have changed very little in the last 30 plus years. Bargains can be found but generally the price has stayed at around £2 per tub while the quantity of crickets per tub has gone down the quantity of locusts contained per tub has increased probably due to the locusts taking over as the best selling livefood.

When they talk about cheap insect production I assume they are talking mainly about production in warmer countries here in the UK the cost of heating is a huge chunk of the production cost possibly even higher than the cost of the labour required.

Livefoods are difficult and costly to distribute here in the Uk due to the constantly changing weather and can involve the livefoods changing hands many times before they are sold in the retail outlets. Each level of distribution has to make a profit and this adds to the over all cost.

As a food for human consumption i assume that bugs would not have the 20 percent VAT added to them that livefood sales do.

Production for human consumption would most likely involve the insects immediately being killed and processed into a powdered or freeze dried form that would greatly reduce the cost of storage and distribution.
As in most cases when it come to making things in the UK we are generally fat, lazy, greedy and inefficient. Whereas in the rest of Western Europe they are less fat, less lazy, less greedy and very productive with very efficient industries.
As for distribution costs unless you are a high volume buyer their is a delivery charge on top of the livefood cost.
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