Defra advice for Brexit EU imports Donny 22 sept - Reptile Forums

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Old 23-09-2019, 04:32 PM
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Default Defra advice for Brexit EU imports Donny 22 sept

I was fairly busy on my table at Donny yesterday and didn't get time to quiz the defra people at yesterdays show. All I got was secondhand chat. Being told that animals for personal ownership ( non cities A10) will still be allowed with completion of applicable form and through Harwich as the designated port of entry (lobbying from Peregrine?). Residing in Suffolk latter bit no problem for me. Would be grateful if people who had a good chat with defra yesterday can fill in any blanks.
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Old 23-09-2019, 10:26 PM
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To be honest I didn't know that they had even worked out how to get food into the country, let alone anything else?
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Old 24-09-2019, 08:02 AM
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If they are CITES listed you will need the relevant CITES permits. The fact that they referred to a designated port confirms that as this was one of the recent changes to the Control of Trade In Endangered Species Regs.
The UK is a CITES party so has to comply with its requirements, which is for an import permit for any specimen from another CITES member country.
The EU tightened up the requirements due to concerns about corruption in some of the main exporting cou tries, requiring both an export certificate and an import permit to the EU.
The reason for this is that international trade is only allowed if there is no negative impact on the wild population. This is part of the test that must be met to grant a permit.
Once we leave the EU we leave the free movement of goods, which was how movement of CITES specimens within the EU was made possible without internal permits.
So at the very least you will need an export permit from the EU and almost certainly an import permit to the UK.
It's an easy process to follow and all done online, you just need to ensure that all the boxes are properly filled in. Any error can lead to seizure of the shipment.

This is the link to the gov.uk page relating to CITES species. Note it refers to Annex D too, which has a number of sp cues listed that may surprise you.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/trading-...ithdrawal-deal
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Old 24-09-2019, 08:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GT2540 View Post
To be honest I didn't know that they had even worked out how to get food into the country, let alone anything else?
if Brexit does actually happen on 31 October with no deal all food from the EU will be waved through with exactly the same type and numbers of checks as on 31 October. Cash generating products leaving the EU will not be subject to any new interference on the east side of the channel. To do so will bankrupt EU food producers who have invested vast sums to supply the UK. Any blockage will be in Kent if the French get awkward.
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Old 15-10-2019, 02:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ian14 View Post
If they are CITES listed you will need the relevant CITES permits. The fact that they referred to a designated port confirms that as this was one of the recent changes to the Control of Trade In Endangered Species Regs.
The UK is a CITES party so has to comply with its requirements, which is for an import permit for any specimen from another CITES member country.
The EU tightened up the requirements due to concerns about corruption in some of the main exporting cou tries, requiring both an export certificate and an import permit to the EU.
The reason for this is that international trade is only allowed if there is no negative impact on the wild population. This is part of the test that must be met to grant a permit.
Once we leave the EU we leave the free movement of goods, which was how movement of CITES specimens within the EU was made possible without internal permits.
So at the very least you will need an export permit from the EU and almost certainly an import permit to the UK.
It's an easy process to follow and all done online, you just need to ensure that all the boxes are properly filled in. Any error can lead to seizure of the shipment.

This is the link to the gov.uk page relating to CITES species. Note it refers to Annex D too, which has a number of sp cues listed that may surprise you.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/trading-...ithdrawal-deal
I have been pursuing this with emails to defra & apha with one passing from one to the other. Then despite specifically asking for personal hobby imports of reptiles got back export links. Then replied asking for IMPORT info eventually getting back reiteration of current position as member of EU namely reference to this passage 6 & &. Pet reptiles and amphibs


Reptiles are cold-blooded, egg-laying vertebrates, e.g. snakes and tortoises.


There are no animal health import requirements for pet reptiles. These animals can be brought into the Great Britain as long as they are accompanied by their owner and a letter from a vet or the owner stating that the animals are fit and healthy to complete the journey.


Amphibians are animals that live on land and breed in water, e.g. frogs and toads. There are no animal health import requirements for pet amphibians. These animals can be brought into Great Britain as long as they are accompanied by their owner and a letter from a vet or the owner saying that the animals are fit and healthy to complete the journey.


Then noticed passage 8 re pet reptiles imported from outside EU which presumably will apply if we leave with no deal.


Pet invertebrates, pet reptiles and pet amphibians which are accompanied by their owner do not need to undergo veterinary checks on entry into Great Britain and therefore they do not need to be imported via a Border Inspection Post (BIP). However you should contact the airline/shipping line to ensure that they are prepared to carry the animal(s).


Having been emailing defra and apha back and forth I am left with the impression they don't know what the procedures will be until it happens.


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Old 17-10-2019, 04:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry python View Post
I have been pursuing this with emails to defra & apha with one passing from one to the other. Then despite specifically asking for personal hobby imports of reptiles got back export links. Then replied asking for IMPORT info eventually getting back reiteration of current position as member of EU namely reference to this passage 6 & &. Pet reptiles and amphibs


Reptiles are cold-blooded, egg-laying vertebrates, e.g. snakes and tortoises.


There are no animal health import requirements for pet reptiles. These animals can be brought into the Great Britain as long as they are accompanied by their owner and a letter from a vet or the owner stating that the animals are fit and healthy to complete the journey.


Amphibians are animals that live on land and breed in water, e.g. frogs and toads. There are no animal health import requirements for pet amphibians. These animals can be brought into Great Britain as long as they are accompanied by their owner and a letter from a vet or the owner saying that the animals are fit and healthy to complete the journey.


Then noticed passage 8 re pet reptiles imported from outside EU which presumably will apply if we leave with no deal.


Pet invertebrates, pet reptiles and pet amphibians which are accompanied by their owner do not need to undergo veterinary checks on entry into Great Britain and therefore they do not need to be imported via a Border Inspection Post (BIP). However you should contact the airline/shipping line to ensure that they are prepared to carry the animal(s).


Having been emailing defra and apha back and forth I am left with the impression they don't know what the procedures will be until it happens.


That has nothing whatsoever to do with CITES species. The link I provided is from the DEFRA section of gov.uk and is specifically for CITES. It's quite clear what they are saying which is that in the event of no deal you will need import and export permits. I fail to elses how this is so difficult to understand!
To summarise:

1) To bring a CITES species in (Annex A, B, C and D) you must obtain an import permit from the UK CITES management authority (DEFRA)
2) To bring such a specimen into the UK from any EU country you must also have an export permit from the relevant management authority in that country
3) You can only use the designated UK port.

Simple as that.
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