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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 26-11-2019, 10:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shellsfeathers&fur View Post
Could possibly be Brazil?
Thank you! Ophiodes fragilis or O.striatus look to be the most likely.
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2019, 10:35 PM
Egg
Join Date: Nov 2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Harris View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marykw View Post
Can you guys help me? This is an male or an female slow worm??
...or a Glass Lizard Ophisaurus sp. Whereabouts did you find / buy it?
In brazil
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2019, 10:36 PM
Egg
Join Date: Nov 2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shellsfeathers&fur View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Harris View Post
...or a Glass Lizard Ophisaurus sp. Whereabouts did you find / buy it?
Could possibly be Brazil?
Yes it was
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 28-02-2020, 10:41 AM
Egg
Join Date: Feb 2020
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slowworm View Post
Thank you for your advice you two, the slow worm is still alive, scarred but surviving.

It is fed slugs from the garden with occasional mealworms & waxworms.

Hoping I can get it through the winter and it may be fit enough to release next year.
Slow worms show exceptional survivability! Even juveniles.
I saved a pregant female from a cat 6 years ago (didn't know it was pregnant of course). It was badly injured, it had claw holes all over it's body and was bleeding severely.
I kept it alive in my large lizard terrarium and it recovered completely! After 2 months it gave birth to 14 little worms of which 11 survived up to today.

First I kept them in my fairly warm large terrarium for 3 years so they didn't brumate and kept on growing all year long. Like all lizards, they're very voracious, so these "juveniles" all have outgrown their momma: they measure between 42 (smallest female) and 53 cm (largest male). Important: they prefer slugs and earth worms! During winter I buy big bags of fishing worms, works fine and quite cheap!

The last 2 winters, I let them all brumate for 3 months in a frost-protected outside terrarium in order to ripen their reproductive cells. A herpatologist told me this is necessary to breed effectively - like other lizards. He assured me inbreeding is not a problem up to 10 consecutive generations of inbreeding - which I will carefully avoid.

Breeding results: summer of 2018: 76 juveniles. I released all of them in my back yard ;-). In summer, I often see them again.
Summer of 2019: 93 juveniles. I realised 68 in different suited places and kept 25 in a separate terrarium. Survival rate after 7 months: 100%. The larges measure almost 30 cm, the tiniest 15 cm. Key to succes (at least I think): providing plenty of preferred food like baby slugs and worms. They will eat crickets and even grasshoppers when hungry, but it's certainly not their natural preference!
The 2nd terrarium is low, wide, provides a lot of cover (mainly wood, stones can be dangerous) and is lit by a basking lamp and a UVB-lamp. My large "other lizard" terrarium has a substrate heater underneath (only partly!).

The herpatologist told me every reptile needs some UVB to function properly and of course warmth. My slow worms really like to bask, but preferable hidden under some pieces of wood.

In short: slow worms are very fascinating (like sphinxes ), really strong, easy to keep and easy to breed.
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2020, 12:00 AM
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I would love to know how this "herpetologist" has come up with 10 generations of inbreeding being fine.
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  #46 (permalink)  
Old Yesterday, 04:15 PM
Egg
Join Date: Feb 2020
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Ok, I might have put it a bit crudely. I don't think he literally said it would be "fine", but that it probably wouldn't cause any significant problems either.
You simply can't compare reptile genetics to human genetics. If we hear "10 generations of consecutive inbreeding", we think deformations, still born babies, hillbillies etc. This seems to be different for lizards. Has something to do with isolated populations still being able to survive if I remember correctly. But I'm not a specialist.

Off course no one in his right mind would try to inbreed lizards this way, there will inevitably be some accumulation of genetics alterations you'd think.
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