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Old 07-12-2012, 04:46 PM
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Hello all,

Got my first snake last weekend so thought i'd register to get a bit more advice on general care etc.

Fed him for the first time last night and had no problems. He's in a 4ft viv which i've read is slightly too big but that's what the woman in the reptile shop I bought him from recommended. He doesnt come out too much from his hides but after i've handled him he stays out and never seems lost or phased by the size. He's been a bit jumpy when handling him but gets more used to it the longer you hold him for.

Was originally looking to get a larger snake, up to about 8/10ft but a combination of things made me go smaller to begin with. Can anyone recommend a snake that would fit this criteria when fully grown? I may look to get a second snake next year depending how I get on.

As I've mentioned, had no problems so far but feel better I can post on here should I need to.

Over and out!
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:42 PM
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A 4ft vivarium is rather large for a hatchling, is it an older snake? It's open spaces that worry snakes, not the amount of space, so as long as it's heavily decorated you shouldn't have too much of a problem, although ensure there's plenty of hides available - on both the cool and hot ends.

Is the snake eating okay?

Congrats on the arrival.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:58 PM
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as above, open spaces rather than amount of space is the problem. if the woman in the shop told you a 4ft viv would suit a hatchling i would urge you not to shop their again as its ludacris. i got my corn in a 1'x1'x1' nano viv and in there he stayed till he was about 4/5 months old. there are many snakes that would fit the criteria for your next snake it just depends on what your looking for as an owner for example, diurnal species (active in the day), noctunals (night time activity), or crepuscular (active at dusk and dawn), basking species (so they have to come out to warm up) or species that are happier with a hide over a heat mat (verry much like the corn you just bought no doubt) in all it comes down to what you want in your pets. i would research and hold out for another snake untill you have your heart set on a specific snake otherwise you may find your passion dwindles and you end up selling the animals, which isnt fair on the snakes. hope this helped. welcome to rfuk and remember, "there is no such thing as a stupid question"
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Old 08-12-2012, 07:21 PM
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Hello,

First of all thanks for the welcome .

Yeah he's eating fine, had his first small mouse on thursday which i was a bit sceptical he could manage but the reptile shop provided us with them so I assumed they were ok. Seem him tonight and he's kept it down so can't have bothered him that much. Think he's about 9 months, which ties in with other people's threads here in relation to their sizes compared with age. He's around 2 foot long but quite thin.

Yeah I thought the viv was fairly big too but was told he'd grow into it. he has three hides in there but not much else (except large water bowl). Generally stays in his smaller hide in the cool end of the viv. Does this sound normal? I'm going to invest in some more hides I think following your advice.

It'd be nice to see the snake a bit more if I got another one so one that's active/basking in the day would be good. I originally wanted a burmese or a boa due to their looks but again, this is without taking owners 'reviews' of these snakes in account, something I'm hoping to get from this forum. I was told the boas (I looked at a common Boa in the shop) can strike for no reason which put my gf off them. I guess this comes down to the individual snake though, not entirely down to the species?

Not going to rush into it anyway as like Bushmaster says, rehoming isn't a route I want to go down.

Apologies for the essay and thanks for all the help!

Regards
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Old 09-12-2012, 09:07 PM
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You can fill space with plastics plants and vines. And maybe get him something to climb, they're very good climbers and it's good exercise for them

Far as larger snakes go, any snake can bite without warning but boas are generally ok and would be a good snake to go for. Carpet pythons would be a good one as well
Rat snakes get bigger than corns, beauty snakes can reach 10 ft+ but stay slimmer.
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Old 09-12-2012, 09:45 PM
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Ask yourself a few questions before you even think of going big like burms ect. Can you house a 20footer? Can yo afford to feed it the larger pray items it requires? Ect ect burmese are notoriously bad tempered if not handled regularly so do you have the time to spend taming a snake like that? A good decent sized snake is something like a carpet python, male red tails may get to roughly 10ft give or take a bit females 12 ft maybe if looked after and fed right and both are epretty docile and both pretty active just some food for thaught
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Old 11-12-2012, 06:28 PM
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Male red tail boas normally hit the 10 foot range but there are more factors to consider than a corn snake. There strength for one is a great deal stronger i believe they say you should ideally have two people in a room when handling a 10 foot boa. And as for the snake being jumpy that will come down to being head shy try to aim taking him out twice a day for half an hour i did this my royal hes now a very confident snake and isnt head shy at all
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:14 PM
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If he's eating and he's big enough to not squeeze out of any holes or between where the glass meets (happens!) then there's no reason why you can't put them in a large viv straight away. If he's staying in the cool end even after eating, the heat source could be a bit too hot for him, are you using a heat mat or bulb? And are you using a thermostat with it? I've found that our corns come out more once they're older and a bit more confident, and when the room they're in is fairly quiet
All the boas we have had or known except from one have been really nicely tempered. I'd probably recommend a boa really, they get to a nice size, there are small dwarfs to choose from, or if you go for a male common they get a bit smaller than the females. Maybe we've been unlucky with carpets, but 5/6 have been snappy or grumpy. However IME, carpets are much more active than boas. Burmese pythons are lovely snakes, but the size difference is a bit of a jump from corns! If you really want one, make sure you've got room for a huge viv, handled a decent sized adult and have 1-2 people on hand to help you when you're dealing with the big snake, just in case. I know there are keepers that handle on their own without issue, but it's always worth being a little careful for your and the snake's sake.

If your gf is worried about something biting, you're probably best off buying an older tamer snake. I don't really believe any snake doesn't give you warning before a bite, it might just be very subtle.
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Old 12-12-2012, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by becky89 View Post
If he's eating and he's big enough to not squeeze out of any holes or between where the glass meets (happens!) then there's no reason why you can't put them in a large viv straight away. If he's staying in the cool end even after eating, the heat source could be a bit too hot for him, are you using a heat mat or bulb? And are you using a thermostat with it? I've found that our corns come out more once they're older and a bit more confident, and when the room they're in is fairly quiet
All the boas we have had or known except from one have been really nicely tempered. I'd probably recommend a boa really, they get to a nice size, there are small dwarfs to choose from, or if you go for a male common they get a bit smaller than the females. Maybe we've been unlucky with carpets, but 5/6 have been snappy or grumpy. However IME, carpets are much more active than boas. Burmese pythons are lovely snakes, but the size difference is a bit of a jump from corns! If you really want one, make sure you've got room for a huge viv, handled a decent sized adult and have 1-2 people on hand to help you when you're dealing with the big snake, just in case. I know there are keepers that handle on their own without issue, but it's always worth being a little careful for your and the snake's sake.

If your gf is worried about something biting, you're probably best off buying an older tamer snake. I don't really believe any snake doesn't give you warning before a bite, it might just be very subtle.
No he cant escape and we've put some more things in there to fill it up a bit, make it seem a bit less vast to him. I've seen such a difference in him since he ate, I dont think he'd been fed in a while at the reptile shop . Am using a bulb with a thermostat. i was told in the shop that it was to be set at 90 degrees in the day and 75 at night. Seeing as the thermometer is in the middle of the viv, I imagine this is far too warm at the warmer end?

Reading about the Boas, I feel they're the best option for me. Even if they're less active I don't want to turn my gf off the idea of keeping snakes, comparing a slightly more aggressive but active snake against a more docile yet less active one if that makes sense? My gf would be there at all time when I handled them but it would generally only be me holding them at any time.
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Old 12-12-2012, 11:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saunders2012 View Post
No he cant escape and we've put some more things in there to fill it up a bit, make it seem a bit less vast to him. I've seen such a difference in him since he ate, I dont think he'd been fed in a while at the reptile shop . Am using a bulb with a thermostat. i was told in the shop that it was to be set at 90 degrees in the day and 75 at night. Seeing as the thermometer is in the middle of the viv, I imagine this is far too warm at the warmer end?
Move the thermometer - you need to know what the hot spot is. The temp at the hot spot should be somewhere between 82 and 88f for a corn. they have quite a large range for temps but if you aim for the middle it should be ok.
And there's no need to change this at night.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saunders2012 View Post
Reading about the Boas, I feel they're the best option for me. Even if they're less active I don't want to turn my gf off the idea of keeping snakes, comparing a slightly more aggressive but active snake against a more docile yet less active one if that makes sense? My gf would be there at all time when I handled them but it would generally only be me holding them at any time.
Not all active snakes are aggressive, I have already advised carpet pythons.
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