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Old 17-08-2014, 01:43 PM
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Default Hydrodynastes bicinctus

Also known as Herrmann's Water Snake, does anyone keep these? What are they like in comparison to H. gigas regarding behaviour/feeding/breeding etc. ?


(Not my photo)

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Old 17-08-2014, 03:13 PM
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They never seem to be available and apparently make very difficult captives.
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Old 17-08-2014, 05:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidR View Post
They never seem to be available and apparently make very difficult captives.
That's a shame, they look lovely.
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Old 17-08-2014, 05:06 PM
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Am I right in thinking that they pretty much requires a diet of amphibians/lizards? I think I remember reading that, but I could be wrong.

In any case, I personally would love some information on H. melanogigas, which appears to essentially be a black FWC, but it's difficult to find so much as information about them, let alone locate any in the trade. From what I understand there is some confusion over their taxonomic status, which doesn't help.
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Old 17-08-2014, 05:15 PM
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I think bicinctus are much more aquatic than gigas and their diet probably reflects this. Melanogigas are another species that look great (from the few pictures that exist) but are unlikely to be available. They are only found in one central region of Brazil, a country with very strict bio-protection laws. They do seem to be just like a melanistic gigas but it is impossible to know if there are any other differences without seeing one.
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Old 17-08-2014, 06:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidR View Post
I think bicinctus are much more aquatic than gigas and their diet probably reflects this. Melanogigas are another species that look great (from the few pictures that exist) but are unlikely to be available. They are only found in one central region of Brazil, a country with very strict bio-protection laws. They do seem to be just like a melanistic gigas but it is impossible to know if there are any other differences without seeing one.
Well that's a shame. Never mind, maybe a captive gigas breeding will randomly pop out a melanistic hatchling one of these days XD
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Old 17-08-2014, 07:45 PM
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There are quite a few really dark FWC knocking about. Not quite melanogigas but not too far off.
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Old 17-08-2014, 11:12 PM
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I imported a group of five hatchlings from Japan nearly two decades ago, but lost the animals over a period of seven years. The specimens I received were captive hatched from two WC females. The japanese importer lost all of his animals in short order, so passed the young on to me; seeing as he hadn't been successful he couldn't offer me any advice on husbandry. I used my usual setup of oversized viv, naturalistic setup, full spectrum lighting and a very large temperature gradient that I've described on other threads. Temps ran 68 to 100 under two low wattage baskings lights placed close to a multilevel cork wood basking platform. Substrate was 8 inches of humus (what people would call bioactive these days,) with a thick layer of leaf litter on top. I provided water in a large cat litter tray for juvies and the trio that survived to adulthood had large sweater boxes for bathing. Humidity ran about 60-80%. The animals never made much use of the upper limits of the basking stack and seemed to prefer temperatures in the 70-80 range, although they did bask under the Vita-Lite tubes in their enclosures. Two of the juveniles never fed and didn't last very long, and i tried a whole lot of prey types: peromyscus pinks, mus minutoides weaners, five types of amphibian, five types of lizard (2 anolis and three gecko species,) the ever reliable sand eels, crayfish, shrimp and squid. Those that did eat took sand eels and freshwater fish scented with trout ova most readily, and interestingly enough for a freshwater species, squid. I ended up with two males and one female. The female grew to about 6 1/2 feet, the males a little over five. They were never very tame, but were more nervous than overtly aggressive. The two males died after about five years during a hot spell in the summer, although my room at the time was air-conditioned, there's not much you can do to alter mass temps, so this may have been a factor, but I'm not certain. The female was found dead one morning two years later, totally without warning. PM's on all three were inconclusive. The Japanese dealer mentioned scale rot as a factor in the deaths of some of his original WC stock, but I never had that problem. Never managed to get them to breed, but I did place each males shed skin in with the other to stimulate male/male combat in the hope of initiating breeding, didn't work, but saw some pretty impressive combat displays, well, as impressive as a bout between one snake and one shed skin can be. On a side note, they don't keep the attractive juvie pattern and colour for very long although the adults which are light grey with dark red brown crossbands are still very attractive.

Kindest regards,
Alex
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Old 18-08-2014, 08:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidR View Post
There are quite a few really dark FWC knocking about. Not quite melanogigas but not too far off.
True. I guess it would be possible to line breed for successively darker animals without too much difficulty.

Quote:
Originally Posted by glebopalma28
I imported a group of five hatchlings from Japan nearly two decades ago, but lost the animals over a period of seven years. The specimens I received were captive hatched from two WC females. The japanese importer lost all of his animals in short order, so passed the young on to me; seeing as he hadn't been successful he couldn't offer me any advice on husbandry. I used my usual setup of oversized viv, naturalistic setup, full spectrum lighting and a very large temperature gradient that I've described on other threads. Temps ran 68 to 100 under two low wattage baskings lights placed close to a multilevel cork wood basking platform. Substrate was 8 inches of humus (what people would call bioactive these days,) with a thick layer of leaf litter on top. I provided water in a large cat litter tray for juvies and the trio that survived to adulthood had large sweater boxes for bathing. Humidity ran about 60-80%. The animals never made much use of the upper limits of the basking stack and seemed to prefer temperatures in the 70-80 range, although they did bask under the Vita-Lite tubes in their enclosures. Two of the juveniles never fed and didn't last very long, and i tried a whole lot of prey types: peromyscus pinks, mus minutoides weaners, five types of amphibian, five types of lizard (2 anolis and three gecko species,) the ever reliable sand eels, crayfish, shrimp and squid. Those that did eat took sand eels and freshwater fish scented with trout ova most readily, and interestingly enough for a freshwater species, squid. I ended up with two males and one female. The female grew to about 6 1/2 feet, the males a little over five. They were never very tame, but were more nervous than overtly aggressive. The two males died after about five years during a hot spell in the summer, although my room at the time was air-conditioned, there's not much you can do to alter mass temps, so this may have been a factor, but I'm not certain. The female was found dead one morning two years later, totally without warning. PM's on all three were inconclusive. The Japanese dealer mentioned scale rot as a factor in the deaths of some of his original WC stock, but I never had that problem. Never managed to get them to breed, but I did place each males shed skin in with the other to stimulate male/male combat in the hope of initiating breeding, didn't work, but saw some pretty impressive combat displays, well, as impressive as a bout between one snake and one shed skin can be. On a side note, they don't keep the attractive juvie pattern and colour for very long although the adults which are light grey with dark red brown crossbands are still very attractive.

Kindest regards,
Alex
Very interesting read!
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'Yig' - CB13 male false water cobra

'Cynothoglys' ('Lisa') - CB?? female wonder gecko
'Bukrog' - CB?? male wonder gecko

'Leng' CB unsexed Chilean rose tarantula
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Old 18-08-2014, 08:36 AM
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Some snakes are simply not ment to be kept i found this out with i think it was macrops they look like a little red cobra i thought awesome till i found out that no ones ever kept one successfully in captivity and there always the classic dragon snake that one of the big shops gets in. someone then posts how there going to be one of the first to get one to live and breed etc 6 months later if that dead snake....... I guess were not as good at this as we wud all like to think we are
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