Loose substrates & the myth of gut compaction. - Page 2 - Reptile Forums

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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 18-08-2019, 12:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wilkinss77 View Post
Rosy boas also need a fine, loose substrate as they too occasionally burrow, but not to the degree that sand boas do. I have a Californian coastal rosy- he's on a dry eco earth substrate about an inch deep.
Thanks for the clarification, which should also help the a new member with their research
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 04-11-2019, 01:40 PM
Egg
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Default The myth behind lose substrate

I am an experienced snake owner who is in between snakes at the moment i have owned a Speckled king snake, corn snake, common water snake, rose boa and , ball python all of which i donated to different schools im my area so kids would stop being afraid of snakes i had to do so because i moved across the united states and i can tell you right now the loose substrate thing is bs however with certain substrates the chemicals use will be harmful to the snake and other will be fine for the snake personally i like to use coco fiber substrate because it is easier on the snake to move around and burrow in but i have used the fine wood shavings which are just a good you don't want to use the big wood shavings as it will get stuck in the scales which personally i have never had happen so yes certain loose substrate is bad for your snake however i don't personally know the down sides of the carpet ,tile ,and mats because i haven't used them.
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Old 04-11-2019, 01:49 PM
Egg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loxocemus View Post
there should be a caveat in this regarding neonate's, especially of small species, their digestive tract is minuscule and very fragile. what an adult can pass may not travel as well in the neonate form. iv seen this personally in a yellow rat neonate i believe it was, the lower portion of the large intestine was blocked and i had to manually remove the compacted substrate, so its not a myth when it actually happens.

some dry substrates expand when they come in contact with fluids inside the stomach and intestines and this should be kept in mind. a main point not mentioned here is that you should thoroughly dry ur food items to prevent food sticking to it and then being consumed, and the consumption should be kept to a minimum as we do not know what chemicals or contaminants or pollutants are added in the industrial process or at point of source.

another point wild animals are not eating mouthfuls of substrates regularly, the rodents they eat are warm and dry, no large amounts of matter are sticking to them during swallowing.

if there is a myth its not compaction its that snakes are regularly consuming the substrate they live on, they have a biology suited for accidental and minimal substrate ingestion, that is contaminant free mind you. captivity is the opposite, their ingesting larger amounts of foreign matter alien to their biology, ie a hognose did not evolve to pass wood pulp or coconut husk and it should not be assumed it can be done without consequence over the animals lifespan, as we have no idea what compounds a snakes stomach acid can leech from these "natural" substrates.

another point, papers and their like have their place in quarantine enclosures mite treatment enclosures etc. the comparison between what animals live on in the wild and the substrates (and parameters around them) offered in captivity is flawed, soil in a wooden cage is not wild replication and it should not be assumed that anything that happens thereafter is "natural" and consequence free.

rgds
ed
you wont have tis problem if you take the snake out of its main container and put it in a separate container where you feed it the the substrate "myth" doesn't happen because its prey is no where near the "problem substrate"
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Old 04-11-2019, 02:13 PM
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Zappy, welcome to the forum.

The topic of feeding in viv or removing the animal to a "feeding tub" has been debated to death on the forum. If you use the "search this forum" function, or browse through the pages you will be able to read the opinions of other members, and maybe you'll understand the reasons why people do not advocate doing this, especially when it comes to large or potentially food focused snakes.
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Old 04-11-2019, 08:48 PM
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Dear Zappy,
I believe moving your snakes into a “feeding container” only causes stress.
You should not handle a snake for 2-3 days after they’ve been fed due to the risk of regurgitation. This could very easily disrupt a snake’s very delicate digestive system. When it comes to large snakes such as Burmese and reticulated pythons, anacondas and boa constrictors, you have to be very cautious. I made the mistake of touching my Burmese python after she had just finished eating, due to the fact that she was still in feeding mode I ended up with black and blue fingers. Although she would never bite out of anger or aggression she certainly would bite and constrict if she confuses someone for a bit of food. Thankfully she was only 8ft at the time and I was rather inexperienced, she’s not 17ft and if I were to make the same mistake the best case scenario would be a broken arm. Large snake keepers have died due to feeding mistakes.
Your snake does not need a separate container for food, they should be left alone before, during and after feeding. I’ve used this method for years and haven’t had a problem. That’s simply my opinion and experience though. If it works for you that’s fantastic. Welcome to the forum!
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