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Old 20-11-2019, 11:39 PM
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Default Snakes in exo terra vivs?

I have a spare 60x45x45 exo terra viv which I would like to use. Ideally I would like to get some kind of smaller snake. However, I heard that glass vivs are not good for housing snakes. What are your opinions on this? Do any of you keep snakes in exo terra vivs?

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Old 21-11-2019, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by trpk View Post
I have a spare 60x45x45 exo terra viv which I would like to use. Ideally I would like to get some kind of smaller snake. However, I heard that glass vivs are not good for housing snakes. What are your opinions on this? Do any of you keep snakes in exo terra vivs?

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I think wooden vivs are favoured as they retain heat better than glass and mesh lids.


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Old 21-11-2019, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by trpk View Post
I have a spare 60x45x45 exo terra viv which I would like to use. Ideally I would like to get some kind of smaller snake. However, I heard that glass vivs are not good for housing snakes. What are your opinions on this? Do any of you keep snakes in exo terra vivs?

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I have a young Green Bush Ratsnake (G.Prasinum) in a small Exo Terra but only because they do not require high temperature's - Glass enclosure's just do not hold heat well at all. Once he is large enough & less skittish he will be moved into a 'Viv-Tek' enclosure (Which i absolutley swear by) and i'll most likely sell the exo terra as i personally just do not feel it is suitable for any snake species which i wish to keep.

Surprisingly, I also had previous trouble with Exo Terra's holding humidity levels well. Two young Amazon tree boa's began having extremely bad shed's once they were moved from RUBs and into Exo Terra's, I very quickly returned them to RUBs until the adult enclosure's arrived. I've since been told that to aid the Exo Terra's in holding humidity, cover the mesh lid with cling film or something similar - I am yet to try this so can not comment.

There is also some arguement that snakes do not do well in glass enclosures because they are so open, snakes like to feel enclosed.

Personally, i just find Exo terra's & other glass enclosures to be a lot of extra effort but that's not to say it can't be done! We had an old glass enclosure lying around which i tidied up and it now houses a male hognose snake. It's always a battle to keep an eye on his temperature's but the ceramic does an ok job. What helps is this enclosure is in our reptile room, so the cooler end of the enclosure seems to be relativley warm & not too cold - It's just the maintanence of the hot spot which gives us grief (The ceramic/stat is always on) but the little hognose is thriving & i've had no issues with it. Although if i'm honest, if i hadn't of kitted it out then i would have got rid and bought the viv-tek enclosure or a wooden one.
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Old 21-11-2019, 12:54 PM
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If they are adapted and set up correctly there is no reason they cannot be used. I kept a pair of ATBs in one, they were clearly happy as they bred for several years in it. You will need to cover most of the roof with perspex and a n colder weather you may want to stick polystyrene panels to the sides. Alternatively make an expanded foam panel similar to the one that comes with the exo terra, to out on the inside of the tank sides.
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Old 21-11-2019, 01:27 PM
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There's nothing wrong with glass per se as a material for snake housing. In fact I know that Francis / Thrasops really rates it. If your ambient temperatures are OK and you can provide a hot spot appropriate for the species you are keeping, there is no reason why exo terra couldn't work for a snake.

However the issue I think in your case is the size. What species were you contemplating putting in there? 60 x 45 isn't much room.
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Old 21-11-2019, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by johndavidwoods View Post
There's nothing wrong with glass per se as a material for snake housing. In fact I know that Francis / Thrasops really rates it. If your ambient temperatures are OK and you can provide a hot spot appropriate for the species you are keeping, there is no reason why exo terra couldn't work for a snake.

However the issue I think in your case is the size. What species were you contemplating putting in there? 60 x 45 isn't much room.


^ THIS^

Iíve had great successes over the years with glass vivs and all kinds of snakes ... they were fabulous for my Brazilian Rainbow Boas as they love humid conditions


Small glass Exo Terra vivs are brilliant for all manner of hatchlings as well


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Old 21-11-2019, 01:58 PM
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Glass is a poor insulator but a good conductor where heat is concerned, and like most things there are so many variable in any installation it's impossible to predict the results you will get based on those of others.

If your house is modern and efficient then chances are the ambient room temperature will remain around 21-23c after the central heating is switched off, and thus the ambien air temp inside the glass vivarium will be in the same region if mats are used, or above if a ceramic is used. However, if your house isn't that well insulated then the ambient room temperature (in the UK) for this time of year will drop down to 16-18c at night. This will cause the CHE to run almost continuously as the heat will migrate through the glass to the room as its cooler.

Now on the plus side, if you have a species that needs to burmate, having an enclosure where the enclosure reaches these low temperatures and doesn't retain heat can be an advantage.

Foam on either inside or outside if the glass panels can help retain the heat, but the offset is either a reduced volume inside the enclosure, or something that is not ecstatically pleasing on the eye.

Choosing the right type and form of enclosure (glass, wood, plastic, fibreglass) is all part of the research, and it should be more along the lines of getting an enclosure that suits the species of reptile rather than vice-versa IMO
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Old 21-11-2019, 02:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johndavidwoods View Post
However the issue I think in your case is the size. What species were you contemplating putting in there? 60 x 45 isn't much room.
to be honest I was not thinking about it yet. at first, I am just trying to figure out if it would be a good idea to keep a snake in Exo terra enclosure.
However, I think there are some snakes that do not grow too long like for example scarlet kingsnakes, some garter snakes or western hognose, house snakes or maybe an egg-eating snake.
In an ideal world, if I could choose any snake I would go either for smooth green snakes or rough green snakes, but I understand they are hard to get right and I am new to keeping snakes so not sure I would be able to give them what they need.
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Old 21-11-2019, 02:32 PM
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This idea that glass isn't good as a material to house snakes in is another one of those hobby myths that somehow has become ingrained in the culture to the point of annoyance.

Glass is just fine as a material, in fact I'd argue it's probably one of the best with the widest range of uses. Amphibians? Tropical, planted vivs? Cooler vivs? Semi-aquatic vivs? Vivs that can provide the largest thermal gradient in a small space (great for small desert animals)? Glass caters to all.

The "problem" with glass is heat retention - only it's not always problem, it can be turned to your advantage in that it allows you to create really big thermal gradients. The problem with glass is that it requires different methods of heating and is often more costly to heat than a tub or a wooden viv, and because often the heating and lighting elements will be outside the viv itself it becomes difficult to stack glass enclosures without the use of often-expensive racking systems that result in less efficiency and economy of space.

Yes, certain species that require more constant ambient temperatures like Royal Pythons probably are slightly easier to heat in wooden vivs, that's not to say they cannot be kept in glass though, it's just less efficient... and even then I'm doubtful that's really true. People have been breeding all kinds of delicate tropical amphibians like dart frogs, tree frogs, or small tropical geckos like Phelsuma and so on in glass enclosures, those are far more sensitive to temperature than most snakes are!

BUT where this kind of viv shines is for species that require a large thermal gradient (most non-tropical species). They are great for desert species, you can have an overhead heater blasting down really high temperatures on one side of a mesh-topped enclosure creating a basking zone for high-heat species, and a foot or so to the side you have ambients going down to almost room temperature. At night, temperatures can be allowed to drop to room temperature - ideal for desert species or those from temperate habitats, for example.

Wood, plastic, glass, fibreglass... all materials have their place and all can be used for different things. I find glass an excellent material for single display vivs, I would happily house most if not all of my animals in glass vivs if it were not for the problems stacking them, in this respect wood is far better! But I find wooden enclosures, especially anything smaller than 4x2x2', can have problems retaining too much heat.

I would be inclined to agree that a 45x45x60cm Exoterra is too small for all but baby snakes though.

Last edited by Thrasops; 21-11-2019 at 02:39 PM..
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Old 21-11-2019, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Malc View Post

Choosing the right type and form of enclosure (glass, wood, plastic, fibreglass) is all part of the research, and it should be more along the lines of getting an enclosure that suits the species of reptile rather than vice-versa IMO
I don't see anything wrong with doing research to try to identify a species that could be housed suitably in an enclosure somebody already owns. It's a fairly common situation to be in, because of the advice, now less frequently dished out thankfully, to house young snakes in smaller enclosures and upgrade them as they grow.

The problems start when somebody has a pre-existing enclosure and a fixed idea of the kind of snake they want, and aren't prepared to be flexible on the latter if the enclosure isn't suitable for it.
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