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Old 17-12-2008, 02:53 AM
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Been a fan o the way these look for a while but ruled them out as my first larger boid due to the rep they have of being snappy. This does not worry me as i have worked with large grumpy boas before and its all more experience after all, but i would still like some keepers input on this subject. Also o males get smaller and are there any young about now or due in the future that you know of?

Cas
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Old 17-12-2008, 09:35 AM
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In my opinion, Scrubs are a different proposition to boas.

Along with retics, scrubs have to be the most intelligent of the boidae family. They are very alert and in a number of cases, highly strung. When striking, they have almost a telescopic ability. The strike range of a stimulated sub adult/adult scrub is incredible.

Having said that, if you can obtain a captive bred baby and work with, and I mean really work with him, you can end up with a trustworthy animal.

For something a bit smaller, there are generally a few M.Nauta produced each year in Europe. This could be an option. Don't get me wrong, I'm not trying to put you off keeping a barneck, you just need to be aware, they are a real commitment in both time and effort. If you are prepared to go down this route, they will end up being one of your prize possessions.

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Rob
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Old 17-12-2008, 09:50 AM
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Just to reiterate what Robuk has said really,but Scrubs are in no way comparable to even the nastiest Boa.I have only kept the Southerns myself(so far!) but they are in a different league to any other snake I have worked with.Highly alert,definitely highly strung and that strike range is something to behold! At approx 9 - 10 ft long my male Southern could easily range 5ft strikes from the branch,and would do at any given opportunity.They have a feeding response that takes you by surprise each and every time and they are very fast to learn.By learn I mean offer prey from the same side of the viv just 3 or 4 times in a row and they will then approach and wait at that side when you enter the room!Admitidley mine was already a knarly adult when I got him,so a CB baby and lots of handling would surely make a difference.
Wonderful snakes and a species I will certainly venture into again,but they are a lot of work(even water changes can become a 1/2 hour job if they are not in the mood)and are not to be taken lightly in the slightest.
As a side note,for a first venture into Scrubs,the Tanimbar locality reportedly stay 6 - 8 ft long so make for a less dangerous captive for a first.
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Old 17-12-2008, 10:53 AM
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Out of all of the snake species I have had here, the barneck is the one that kept me on my toes at all times.

I won't repeat what has already been said above, but will endorse it.

Hubby and I came unstuck with this species at first, and certainly learnt a lot very quickly. It was helped I'm sure, by the fact that we have Coastal Carpets, here, which whilst not having the strength of the barneck when it comes to constriction, do however sometimes constrict in the same way. This is to constrict up tightly for example on your arm, and then tuck both their head and tail inside of their coils. I don't need to explain that one further.

The bite from a large barneck is something else too. I recall this young adult female sinking her teeth into Hubby one day in a flash, and at the same time sailed through the air and landed on his arm and constricted just above the bite. She had hit a vein, and the blood was spouting everywhere including a foot high towards the ceiling. Her head was free and she was quite willing to bite again too. To keep it short, the outcome was that thanks to the constriction, she in turn acted as a means to halt the steady stream of blood, and when she realised it was not food that she had hold of, she calmed right down, and became very gentle. The fact that she had missed a feed due to me not being able to get hold of her favourite and only choice of food at that time, had been the cause of this, plus the fact that I had been stupid enough to get her into a routine where she was held, then cleaned out, and put back, and then on the next visit to her some hours later, was fed. She knew her food was overdue, and so did not hesitate when approached expecting it to be that well overdue feed.

Just to add here,that I was behind the scenes at the reptile house with Mark O'shea at the West Midlands Safari Park, and Mark fed many there with no problems, including the giant boids, even walkking right up the crocs in their enclosure, and slapping a rat on their nose, with his legs just about a foot away from their mouths, and yet when we arrived at the barnecks enclosure, Mark used a 9ft pole, and believe me when I say it was required. I watched one barneck strike straight out about 9ft in distance with ease. They have a prehensile tail which enables them to be able to do this, whilst staying in contact with their branch.

Having said all of this, Mark and I did not have CB youngsters. We both went in at the deep end with adult WC's, but we gained in that we became aware of their strengths and intelligence very quickly, and with time the ones here calmed down well.

I have had the pleasure to hold CB adults too, and these were so calm and gentle, but they had a brilliant owner,who worked hard with them, and harmony and respect was bulit upon, to the extent that his snakes could be handed to others for a hold without anyone being biten. I hope he will spot this thread and reply. (Stops here to remember Dave with great fondness That the snake's name by the way, but the owner is very sweet too.

This is not a species that you can place in a viv and expect to hold just when you feel like it. You have to commit yourself to being in contact throughout. Well worth while if you are truly intent on giving the snake the time it requires in order for it to be a pleasure rather than a dread.

Mo.
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Old 17-12-2008, 12:53 PM
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Blimey you guys give scrubs a bad name!!

They certainly dont deserve it,

When I lived in the UK scrubs were a bit of a fascination of mine, at the time I had every locality of scrub available, and had managed to breed the mereauke(aka southern), and tanimbar.

Maureen all of the scrubs I took to the lecture I gave were wild caught animals. Big dave was imported some time ago ( 1988 )

I did have a couple of scrubs which were aggressive but no more % wise than any otehr species I have worked with. As long as they are happy and in a viv that they feel happy in all is well.

Of course they are mostly not a small snake (I had around 40 scrubs), the longest being around 5 meters.

There are some scrubs available cb each year within europe also.

All of my scrubs I could free handle directly from their viv, they are a very intelligent snake (much more intelligent than a retic), and as most are at least semi arboreal you do need to have a different husbandry apporach to a ground dwelling snake.

There are lots of beautiful localities of scrubs, and a variety of sizes.
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Old 17-12-2008, 01:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon_G View Post
Blimey you guys give scrubs a bad name!!

They certainly dont deserve it,

When I lived in the UK scrubs were a bit of a fascination of mine, at the time I had every locality of scrub available, and had managed to breed the mereauke(aka southern), and tanimbar.

Maureen all of the scrubs I took to the lecture I gave were wild caught animals. Big dave was imported some time ago ( 1988 )

I did have a couple of scrubs which were aggressive but no more % wise than any otehr species I have worked with. As long as they are happy and in a viv that they feel happy in all is well.

Of course they are mostly not a small snake (I had around 40 scrubs), the longest being around 5 meters.

There are some scrubs available cb each year within europe also.

All of my scrubs I could free handle directly from their viv, they are a very intelligent snake (much more intelligent than a retic), and as most are at least semi arboreal you do need to have a different husbandry apporach to a ground dwelling snake.

There are lots of beautiful localities of scrubs, and a variety of sizes.
Hi Jon,

Certainly not trying to give scrubs a bad name. I just think that for someone who has not kept them before, they need to be aware of what they are taking on ie a very intelligent, alert animal that has the potential to get rather large.

When I got my first scrub (a little baby barneck), it was certainly an eye opener. I did my reading before committing, but was still surprised at the agility, alertness etc..

What nobody wants is someone buying a baby scrub, not really committing 100% to their maintainence and then trying to offload a six foot snake with plenty of attitude, because they didn't interact with the animal enough when it was a youngster.

I would love to see more people keeping scrubs, but they are not for everyone.
Best regards
Rob
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Old 17-12-2008, 01:18 PM
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I must be lucky. My scrub is the softest snake I have. It eats like a trooper but has never struck at me or anyone else.
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Old 17-12-2008, 01:23 PM
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I think everyone should have a scrub !!

They are by far the most interesting snakes to have in your life.

Of course people need to be committed to ownership of any reptile, most scrubs although long are very slender (compared to a retic or burm of the same length)

They do have special requirements for husbandry also, BUT I don't agree they are to be avoided because of being aggressive etc.

Certainly no more than retics, burms, anacondas etc these all also have powerful feeding responses when large.

If people start off with babies they can grow in husbandry as the animal grows and hopefully will have a long time together !!
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Old 17-12-2008, 02:17 PM
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Thanks for the good info , seems there is mixed feeling which i thought may well be the case. I remember when no one would keep retics due to there bad reputation, they where more often WC than CB then. Could this be a similar situation with the scrubs now or the ones some of you where referring too kept in the past?

I will not be taking anything lightly dont worry.
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Old 17-12-2008, 04:51 PM
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Any more comments? I am only aware of a few older males around 6 to 7ft no younger snakes though. Both the ones ive seen are viv defensive.
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