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Discussion Starter #21
Two of my vivs have habistat dimming thermostats and analogue humidity dials, the other two use high temp microclimate day/night dimming stats and digital humidity displays.

All are wooden vivs, 2 extra circular vent cut into the viv at the cool end with homemade "plugs" so i can close one or both off as needed.

I dont use any automated misters or anything (small hand held spray/mister) and i use a mix of clay substrate with topsoil and sand to form a 3 inch or so layer of substrate with branches, slate and cork.

I manually regulate the temps using a temp gun and a digital thermometer and mist the viv every other day, spraying more into the cool end than the warm end. Try to maintain 45C (roughly) at basking spot, and in summer will open up the extra vents to keep the cool end under 25C, humidity measurements are taken from the cool end and i will give it an extra light mist if it drops under 35% there but it stays areound 40% mostly and then peaks up when i properly mist the vivs to around 70% and then drops back down over a few hours.
 

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Brilliant!

Hi

What a fantastic care guide, concise and easily understood for new keepers like myself. I already have a Royal Python and about to get my first beardy, guides like this are invaluable and I can't thank you enough for taking the time to put this together with your knowledge and your own personal experiences.

No doubt I will be back here (bookmarked!) with MANY questions hahaha!!

Thank again my friend.
 

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You didn’t touch on brumation, unless I miss it, hope you can help here..
Is it normal for a bearded to sleep for days then get up for a day and not eat or poop then go back to sleeping for days during this process? He seems fine otherwise. I don’t want to have to take him to a vet for a big bill ( not that I don’t care about him cuz I do) just for them to say he is brumating ( I am guessing he is a he lol I dunno ) thanks for any help 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Its not unusual no, brumation is a deep sleep, but not as deep as hibernation.
They can be woken and disturbed during, not very good for them, but they will wake, move a bit and then sleep.
If you are concerned that its brumating, you can raise your temps slightly and ensure a good food supply is still available, to try and get it to forget about brumating (which they do to get through colder/harsh seasons with low food supplies).

Some will still insist on brumating, some will perk up.

While the weather is like this (cold, wet and windy) mine are all hiding away, not brumating but sheltering more as if to get ready.
You will probably find yours goes to sleep for a a longer period in the middle of its brumation, but ive found even with mine, they can wake up and spend a day sitting there before going back to sleep.
 

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wow is this out of date

I have been breeding dragons in the uk for over 20 years and cannot believe some of the things here are so out of date.
I do not fit a night light or any heat in my vivariums.
go to Australia stand in the desert of a night it is freezing the dragons burrow in the sand to keep warm.
your house does not get that cold in the night.
males females and young.
a male will eat the young a female will not. if you breed dragons and the eggs are laid in a box outside the viv when they are due to hatch you can see the female scratching at the glass of the viv to get out to the eggs.
if the female is on her own you can put the young in with her and she will let them sit on or around her, I have known females to stop laying for that year once the young are put with her.
once a female has laid a second batch i will shorten the daylight hours in the viv for 2 weeks and the male will stop chasing her.
when putting dragons together for the first time they are no different than cats and dogs, one will eat first and pick the best spot.
it is nature when at home sit in your husbands or wife's favorite chair and see what happens.
i have a male dragon that when i sit in my chair i unknowingly tap my foot and my dragon goes crazy banging at the glass of the viv, the sole of my slipper is black and he sees it as a challenge to his domain.
at the end of the day dragons are domesticated and only 2 males will fight, I have kept 4 females together without a problem, they even commune around one area of a night.
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
So, Telb... other than the very strong feeling that you're a troll poster..
I have been breeding dragons in the uk for over 20 years and cannot believe some of the things here are so out of date.
I do not fit a night light or any heat in my vivariums.
go to Australia stand in the desert of a night it is freezing the dragons burrow in the sand to keep warm.
your house does not get that cold in the night.
males females and young.
a male will eat the young a female will not. if you breed dragons and the eggs are laid in a box outside the viv when they are due to hatch you can see the female scratching at the glass of the viv to get out to the eggs.
if the female is on her own you can put the young in with her and she will let them sit on or around her, I have known females to stop laying for that year once the young are put with her.
once a female has laid a second batch i will shorten the daylight hours in the viv for 2 weeks and the male will stop chasing her.
when putting dragons together for the first time they are no different than cats and dogs, one will eat first and pick the best spot.
it is nature when at home sit in your husbands or wife's favorite chair and see what happens.
i have a male dragon that when i sit in my chair i unknowingly tap my foot and my dragon goes crazy banging at the glass of the viv, the sole of my slipper is black and he sees it as a challenge to his domain.
at the end of the day dragons are domesticated and only 2 males will fight, I have kept 4 females together without a problem, they even commune around one area of a night.

I thought I should still answer the points you have made.

Firstly, it was written years ago, May 2016 to be more accurate, and is still far more up to date than the majority of guides people will find online.

Secondly, There is no need for heating at night unless it drops significantly below 16C for the majority of the night (theres a reason why they burrow into the earth, and its to avoid the cold temperatures on the surface).

Thirdly, you shouldnt have any lights on in the viv at night.

Both the night lighting and night heating points are covered in the original posts, and im not sure why you are talking about them as if i have said the opposite, because I havent. The way you have written what you have also implies that there should be no heating at all...which is complete nonsense, its a basking species from a much warmer climate than the UK, last time i checked ambient air temps hit 24 c for about 2 weeks in the middle of summer here, not for months at a time with regular peaks nearing 30C...

As for your "bit" about keeping hatchlings in with the mother, you make it sound like they have some sort of maternal instinct.
They do not. Bearded dragons have no parental inclinations towards their offsping. Its a simple fact about the species.
I also havent talked about breeding, quite intentionally, because its not aimed at people wanting to breed them, its aimed at brand new keepers who need to learn the basics (its even mentioned about wanting to keep it simple when discussing feeding habits later on and the findings of a study looking at the contents of their stomachs in the wild).


Your female(s) might not attack/eat new hatchlings, I would put that more down to the individual animal and that its given a plentiful diet, rather than a rule. Both males and females have been known to eat their offspring.
Its just the way it is. Doesnt mean it will always happen, but considering this is aimed at giving complete beginners a starting point over-complicating it is a bad idea

If there is anything specific that you feel is out of date, you are welcome to quote the bit of text and ask about it, or suggest what you think it should say, rather than making up points and going off on a tangent thats not even discussed or only briefly discussed for the purposes of keeping the information clear and as simple as possible for a new owner.

Welcome to the forums.
 

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As for your "bit" about keeping hatchlings in with the mother, you make it sound like they have some sort of maternal instinct.
They do not. Bearded dragons have no parental inclinations towards their offsping. Its a simple fact about the species.

Agreed. In the wild once they have laid the eggs they move on and leave the eggs.


Your female(s) might not attack/eat new hatchlings, I would put that more down to the individual animal and that its given a plentiful diet, rather than a rule.

And extreme good luck!


Both males and females have been known to eat their offspring.

Agreed.


if you breed dragons and the eggs are laid in a box outside the viv when they are due to hatch you can see the female scratching at the glass of the viv to get out to the eggs

Sorry but this just ridiculous. Most dragons will scratch at the glass periodically and for many reasons. Parental instinct is not one of them. If this was the case we would all be rather cruel taking the eggs away from a female. I don't think many of us would breed them if that was true.
 

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I don't see the mother. Unless your saying the one at the front at the glass is the mother which I hope not for obvious reasons to those of us that are experienced beardie owners :gasp:
 

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in the second picture the baby is sat on the mothers back, not on the other females.
In 20 years of keeping dragons i have seen a lot of things that point to dragons being sociable not like everyone says.
It is only the male when put near another dragon of any sex will want to show dominance especially during the breading season.
 

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great guid

Many thanks for this excellent information all in one place. Regards hides is one in hot and one in cold ends best or one in the middle . Getting set up as described with a 4’ 6” long viv and uvb and uva at about 3/4 of tank length basking at hot end with halogen bulb on dimming stat
Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #35
The way i have mine is that the basking platforms (homemade from slate tiles) also have a cave like area underneath, and then with things like cork bark and branches/driftwood dotted around the viv to provide areas to climb or hide behind/under for shade or privacy. I dont specifically have a warm hide and a cool hide, but instead, a variety of spaces to provide partial or complete shelter mixed around the viv.

If you are getting a 4.5ft long viv you should have plenty of room to put multiple bits like this but try not to over clutter the viv. They should be able to move/turn around in the viv without it feeling packed in.
 

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Thanks, that all makes sense, like the cave idea, gives a hot side hide without using more floor space
Cheers
 

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We are now all set up, temps are good and our little Beardie seemed very comfortable for the moment we introduced her to her new home. She’s eating well and comfortable with us already. Just a food question, she’s eating greens in the morning and meal worms and size 3 hoppers, but how many should we feed? Today she had 4 hoppers and 4 mealworms and I am sure she would have eaten many more if we let her. She’s 12 was old and 16cm head to tail tip
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Watch the size and growth, you want it to keep eating greens (providing plentiful live and they will eat that and ignore greens).
See if you can also get hold of some dubia roach nymphs too and continue feeding as you are. Dont be afraid to give a little extra but i would not do "all you can eat", and if it starts to ignore greens cut back a little on live food and try pushing the veggies a little.

It should be active and alert, no signs of any weight loss and the base of the tail and back of its head will plump out rather than being flat when it has good fat reserves, things like its proportions, fat reserves and levels of activity are all good indicators to keep you on a decent path, and try to remember variety in both live and veg given, right now it will benefit from it the most.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
As a note, try to resist using tongs/hand feeding regularly, you want to promote as much activity as possible so making it hunt/catch prey is a good thing.
The more active it is the better, encouraging it to run about and climb willl make a lot of difference.
Try not to have it out the viv so much while young and growing, make it run about for food inside the viv, but letting it out and exploring a bit is good for it. Just dont leave it unattended.
 

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Thanks!
We love watching her chase the hoppers , they don’t last long she like a ninja:)
Really appreciate the advice , it made the setting up so much easier and I am sure this has helped her settle in
 
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