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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all.

I have a 2 year old Red Phase Yellow Ackie, and she seems to take ages to totally shed. I'm not worried by it or anything its just she seems to take ages to shed! Does anyone else have this with theres? I keep geckos and have kept chameleons and they all seem to shed fairly quickly.

I'm guessing it is something to do with the arrid enviroment she lives in. When i notice her starting to shed she will get at least one bath a week and a quick misting once or twice a day. So would it be worth getting some sphagnum moss in a hide for her or any over suggestions would be recieved with gratitude. :2thumb:
 

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Hi all.

I have a 2 year old Red Phase Yellow Ackie, and she seems to take ages to totally shed. I'm not worried by it or anything its just she seems to take ages to shed! Does anyone else have this with theres? I keep geckos and have kept chameleons and they all seem to shed fairly quickly.

I'm guessing it is something to do with the arrid enviroment she lives in. When i notice her starting to shed she will get at least one bath a week and a quick misting once or twice a day. So would it be worth getting some sphagnum moss in a hide for her or any over suggestions would be recieved with gratitude. :2thumb:
Yeh most will shed quite slowly and in bits and pieces, the worst is always the tail especially at the tips.
I pour about 2 litres of water into the substrate and dig box every few days when it dries out, they like moist soil and sand mix substrate, not dry arid conditions like most people think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have kept one before a few years back with an ex and we used to keep him on orchid bark which we kept damp. He was brought from lets say reptile shop A, they advised on a moist substrate (Orchid bark), and this female i now have from reptile shop B they recommended a dry substrate (currently tortoise life substarte). So yet again totally conflicting advice, which i'm totally used to with reptiles! I have also read up on anything i can find relating to this issue from a variety of care sheets.

I think what i will do is when i next clean her out i will replace dry with moist and go for a little bit of good old fashioned trial and error!

Cheers for the reply.
 

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I have kept one before a few years back with an ex and we used to keep him on orchid bark which we kept damp. He was brought from lets say reptile shop A, they advised on a moist substrate (Orchid bark), and this female i now have from reptile shop B they recommended a dry substrate (currently tortoise life substarte). So yet again totally conflicting advice, which i'm totally used to with reptiles! I have also read up on anything i can find relating to this issue from a variety of care sheets.

I think what i will do is when i next clean her out i will replace dry with moist and go for a little bit of good old fashioned trial and error!

Cheers for the reply.
No problem, yes in this hobby there is no right and wrong as such, experimenting is very healthy and it helps finding what works best for you, advice just makes it that much simpler
most people will recommend a 70% soil and 30% sand mixture for substrate and as deep as you can go as they're a burrowing species. Obviously most vivarium don't hold deep substrates which is a pain but try and go as deep as possible, even piling it up at the back to allow digging and burrowing or even a plastic box. That way they will be able to dig into the substrates to get to the more humid parts of the viv instead of having to spray the vivarium, creating a lot of ambient humidity and risking respiratory infections
 
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