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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
the gaps in chicken wire will be too big and the snake will get through holes. I have been keeping arboreal snakes for many years and I can tell you, you really will struggle to provide the proper heat and humidity in a glass viv that is a metre high.
I found a shop that sells guards so I don't have to make one. Humidity is not a problem, it is at 75% now. I'm not going to buy another viv, because I'm only 16 and this one was pretty expensive (€225,-). I'm going to insulate it with 2cm cork, and I wil update the results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Leave the poor thing alone, you've offered it twice in 2 days is too much.
Snakes will not eat when stressed, moving house is very stressful to a snake.
Leave it alone without handling it or offering food for at least 7 days. Just change the water in a few days. Pestering the snake with food is more likely to put it off.
Do not force feed it, this is a last resort after months of trying other things and only when the snake starts to deteriorate.

What was it eating?
Phone the shop where you bought it and ask them what it ate and when.

After 7 days offer a hot prey item similar to what it was eating before later in the evening, if it doesn't strike feed leave it on a perch over night, preferably cover the viv up.

I would also keep in mind that you may have to move it to a smaller home for now, some neonates can be a little nervous in larger vivs, it might be better in a smaller tub for a while while it grows a bit.
If I wait 7 days and she eats good, should I try to feed her 2 times in the week? Or less?
 

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From looking at the size of the viv and teh set up, it is completely wrong for an ATB.
Firstly, if the snake is only 45 cm long, this would suggest it is a very young baby - the viv it is in is WAY too big. It should be in a small tub.
Secondly, the heating method itself is wrong - how are you heating it at night? I hope you are not keeping the lamp on 24 hours a day as this will not allow any period of darkness. Which then means that the snake is left unheated overnight. ATB's come from a region which is warm and damp almost all year round, with almost the same conditions night and day, the only difference being that at night its dark!. You need to change from a spot light to a ceramic heater. This can then be left on 24 hours a day.
Thirdly the decor - for an ATB to feel secure it needs a network of branches, almost in a lattice for the snake to be able to rest on, rather than a few thick branches.
You also need to leave the snake well alone for a few days and then offer a warmed up pink (very warm), and gently wiggle it near by - dont shake it or tap the snake with it, just enough to get its attention. This should also be done in low light as these are nocturnal animals. Eventually, it will feed any time of day, but as a juvenile they tend to be happier feeding at night.
As far as force feeding goes - DONT - unless you are already experienced with this. ATB's have very delicate jaws that could be easily damaged.
If your snake doesnt feed then I would strongly suggest that you rethink your husbandry until it is bigger and older.
I have a breeding trio that are in a viv only 2 feet high, and even then keeping the humidity up can be a challenge.
Dont forget that you also need to spray heavily every day with tepid water - most ATB's will not drink from a bowl, only from droplets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
From looking at the size of the viv and teh set up, it is completely wrong for an ATB.
Firstly, if the snake is only 45 cm long, this would suggest it is a very young baby - the viv it is in is WAY too big. It should be in a small tub.
Secondly, the heating method itself is wrong - how are you heating it at night? I hope you are not keeping the lamp on 24 hours a day as this will not allow any period of darkness. Which then means that the snake is left unheated overnight. ATB's come from a region which is warm and damp almost all year round, with almost the same conditions night and day, the only difference being that at night its dark!. You need to change from a spot light to a ceramic heater. This can then be left on 24 hours a day.
Thirdly the decor - for an ATB to feel secure it needs a network of branches, almost in a lattice for the snake to be able to rest on, rather than a few thick branches.
You also need to leave the snake well alone for a few days and then offer a warmed up pink (very warm), and gently wiggle it near by - dont shake it or tap the snake with it, just enough to get its attention. This should also be done in low light as these are nocturnal animals. Eventually, it will feed any time of day, but as a juvenile they tend to be happier feeding at night.
As far as force feeding goes - DONT - unless you are already experienced with this. ATB's have very delicate jaws that could be easily damaged.
If your snake doesnt feed then I would strongly suggest that you rethink your husbandry until it is bigger and older.
I have a breeding trio that are in a viv only 2 feet high, and even then keeping the humidity up can be a challenge.
Dont forget that you also need to spray heavily every day with tepid water - most ATB's will not drink from a bowl, only from droplets.
As I said, the humidity is not a problem. I use the bulbs 12 hours a day. Does a ceramic heater have a hot spot? And I heard that it's not bad if the temperature drops to 18-20 C at night. I am working on getting more plants and little sticks, and I spray every day. I also frequently check the humidity and the temperature. As I said earlier, I am not going to buy another viv. Maybe I can split it or something untill she is bigger. If you have any other advise, please tell me. Could you upload a pic of your viv so I can compare it to mine? And sorry if my english is bad, I am Dutch.
 

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You don't need to buy another viv, just get a smaller RUB (plastic box with a clip down lid), they're available from Staples or other good stationers and they're very cheap.
I find pieces of garden cane cable tied together and pieces of plastic trellis work very well for neonate arborials. These are not expensive.

As I've suggested before a ceramic heater would be better than a lamp and you don't need a uv light or the lamp, it will provide a hot spot yes.

Maybe you could get a shelf fitted into the viv 1/3 of the way down, then you have a bit of storage space and the viv would not be as high.

You need to provide what is best for the snake, not what you like the look of.

What you have created is nice however it simply isn't suitable for the species of snake you have bought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
You don't need to buy another viv, just get a smaller RUB (plastic box with a clip down lid), they're available from Staples or other good stationers and they're very cheap.
I find pieces of garden cane cable tied together and pieces of plastic trellis work very well for neonate arborials. These are not expensive.

As I've suggested before a ceramic heater would be better than a lamp and you don't need a uv light or the lamp, it will provide a hot spot yes.

Maybe you could get a shelf fitted into the viv 1/3 of the way down, then you have a bit of storage space and the viv would not be as high.

You need to provide what is best for the snake, not what you like the look of.

What you have created is nice however it simply isn't suitable for the species of snake you have bought.
I went to a reptile store before I bought the viv, and they recommended a higher viv because it is an arboreal species. I have an old 100w ceramic heater, it that to hot? How can I put the ceramic heater in a RUB? And how could I possibly make a shelf on a glass viv without glueing it into place?
 

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You really should have done all this research before buying the animal.
Of course the shop told you to buy things you don't need - cos they need to sell things to stay in business, they don't care if it's right or wrong for the snake.
Once you've paid for it it's not their problem anymore.

When I said put a shelf in it I ment glue it in permanently.

How are you controlling the heat at the moment?
It should be on a thermomostat.

DO NOT use a ceramic without a thermostat, you will need a pulse or a dimmer stat for this. Ceramic bulbs can reach temps of over 200C.
You willl need to change the fittings and cables for ceramics ones as well.
Make sure the guard you get clears the bulb by a good few inches all round.

I think you'll find a 100W ceramic probably won't do the job, you my need 150w or higher.

Making a small tub is easy.
Once you've got the tub, cut the middle of the lid out. Stick a piece of metal mesh over the hole, glue it ot the top with sealant. Hang a lamp/ sit a dome lamp over one side of it.
You will have to make this first then set it up and play with adding/reducing ventilation etc to get the correct temps and humidty before putting the snake in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
You really should have done all this research before buying the animal.
Of course the shop told you to buy things you don't need - cos they need to sell things to stay in business, they don't care if it's right or wrong for the snake.
Once you've paid for it it's not their problem anymore.

When I said put a shelf in it I ment glue it in permanently.

How are you controlling the heat at the moment?
It should be on a thermomostat.

DO NOT use a ceramic without a thermostat, you will need a pulse or a dimmer stat for this. Ceramic bulbs can reach temps of over 200C.
You willl need to change the fittings and cables for ceramics ones as well.
Make sure the guard you get clears the bulb by a good few inches all round.

I think you'll find a 100W ceramic probably won't do the job, you my need 150w or higher.

Making a small tub is easy.
Once you've got the tub, cut the middle of the lid out. Stick a piece of metal mesh over the hole, glue it ot the top with sealant. Hang a lamp/ sit a dome lamp over one side of it.
You will have to make this first then set it up and play with adding/reducing ventilation etc to get the correct temps and humidty before putting the snake in it.
I did research but there are a lot of different opinions on this subject, so I did not really know what to do. I have a digital thermometer and a digital hydrometer, and I have multiple bulbs, so if the viv is to hot or to cold I could switch the bulbs. How big should the shelf be? Half the size of the ground? I think that would be good so I could make a hotter side at about 28-32 C and a cooler side at about 25-28 C. And how large should the tub be?
 

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I did research but there are a lot of different opinions on this subject, so I did not really know what to do. I have a digital thermometer and a digital hydrometer, and I have multiple bulbs, so if the viv is to hot or to cold I could switch the bulbs. How big should the shelf be? Half the size of the ground? I think that would be good so I could make a hotter side at about 28-32 C and a cooler side at about 25-28 C. And how large should the tub be?
:bash: I'm sorry but you can't control the temperature of a ceramic by changing the bulb. They can get to over 200C.
A ceramic NEEDS a thermostat to control that. Do not use a ceramic heater without a thermostat or a guard.

And by shelf I ment use a shelf to cut down the size of the viv, so it needs to be the dimensions of the inside of the viv.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
:bash: I'm sorry but you can't control the temperature of a ceramic by changing the bulb. They can get to over 200C.
A ceramic NEEDS a thermostat to control that. Do not use a ceramic heater without a thermostat or a guard.

And by shelf I ment use a shelf to cut down the size of the viv, so it needs to be the dimensions of the inside of the viv.
With bulbs I mean that I have normal bulbs, not ceramic. I'm going to buy some ceramic bulbs. And if I'm going to use a tub, do I need a Uv lamp? Because the ceramic bulb doesn't give light. And if I use a shelf that is the same dimension as the ground, then I couldn't do anything with the space underneath the shelf.
 

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You don't need a uv lamp at all, ever.

And you don't need normal bulbs if you're getting a ceramic bulb.

You can just put a tub on a heat mat to make it easier, sit 1/3 of it on a heat meat controlled by a thermostat. ANY heat source should be controlled by the proper equipment or you are asking for touble.

You won't need so much ventilation in the tub either then.

Can you not put the shelf in the top 1/3 of the viv so you can use the space above it as storage?
 

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any type of heating, bulb, ceramic, heatmat etc should all be controlled by a thermostat

I really dont care what the shop said - the viv isnt suitable end of
 

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As I said, the humidity is not a problem. I use the bulbs 12 hours a day. Does a ceramic heater have a hot spot? And I heard that it's not bad if the temperature drops to 18-20 C at night. I am working on getting more plants and little sticks, and I spray every day. I also frequently check the humidity and the temperature. As I said earlier, I am not going to buy another viv. Maybe I can split it or something untill she is bigger. If you have any other advise, please tell me. Could you upload a pic of your viv so I can compare it to mine? And sorry if my english is bad, I am Dutch.
The humidity IS a problem - you said somewhere that it is at 75% - for a neonate is should be closer to 100%. The temperature should be fairly consistant 24 hours a day - this is a tropical species, not a temperate one. They are also nocturnal and more active at night, and for it to drop to 18/20C at night means that the nigh time temperature is too low.
With respect, I think that unless you make immediate changes to your husbandry this is going to end in disaster.
 

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The humidity IS a problem - you said somewhere that it is at 75% - for a neonate is should be closer to 100%. The temperature should be fairly consistant 24 hours a day - this is a tropical species, not a temperate one. They are also nocturnal and more active at night, and for it to drop to 18/20C at night means that the nigh time temperature is too low.
With respect, I think that unless you make immediate changes to your husbandry this is going to end in disaster.

You know when people come on a site to ask for advice and then find reasons to ignore it all!
 

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I don't think I need a bulb guard yet, my snake is only about 45 cm long, and the guy from the store where I bought the lamps said that it is not nessesary if the snake does not go to the lamp. She only goes to the Uv-b lamp so that should not be a problem. what is a ahs?
I keep these snakes and also a GTP and I can tell you they will go on the bulb. Also my GTP suffered a burn from the UV lamp that I was using for sunlight by sitting on it to long I now have the UVB covered with a guard I made myself.

This is what a uv bulb can do so just think what a heat bulb will do



He has recovered now but it's really not worth the risk
 
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