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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a thermometer at either end of my viv reading the ambiant temps which is what I use to set my thermostat. I also have an infra red digital thermometer which I have read to be highly recommended for accuracy, but this will only read surface temps, which tends to be higher than the ambiant temp reading on my digital thermometers. Which would you guys go by?
 

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I have a thermometer at either end of my viv reading the ambiant temps which is what I use to set my thermostat. I also have an infra red digital thermometer which I have read to be highly recommended for accuracy, but this will only read surface temps, which tends to be higher than the ambiant temp reading on my digital thermometers. Which would you guys go by?
IMHO abiet is important but spot test for the basking area with the infra red, that'swhat I do the sensor n the Habistat (or whatever) reads the ambient but getting the hot spot just right is important too. As I said, my opinon only not saying it's right
 

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I usually measure the air temp about 1" above the floor under the heat bulb. I set the thermostat so the digital thermometer reads the Day Time High and the Night Time Low. I don't bother with the rest of the viv cause I know the snake will move to regulate it's own temp. One thing you need to look out for is where the snake spends most of it's time. If it's always at the cool end, the temp is too hot. If it's always under the heater it's too cold.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
He does move between the two, but I would say he spends most of the time in the hot end.

At this present moment the ambiant in the warm end is 91.6 degrees fahrenheit and the surface temp measured with the infra red is 93.5 degrees F.
 

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He does move between the two, but I would say he spends most of the time in the hot end.

At this present moment the ambiant in the warm end is 91.6 degrees fahrenheit and the surface temp measured with the infra red is 93.5 degrees F.
You don't say what reptile it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
sorry a royal python
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
do you think i need to drop the temp? He is in his warm sides hide at the mo.
 

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I'm not sure but I think the temps should be 86f DTH and 80f NTL. You really need to ask somebody with experience with Royals but the principals are still the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
what does dth and ntl mean?
 

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It means Day Time High and Night Time Low. Every keeper has his own way of doing things. One way is to provide a constant thermal gradient through out the viv. Suppose a snakes temp range is 90f - 80f the keeper might provide a basking temp under the heater at 90f and try to let the cold end fall to 80f. I don't do it that way. I try to mimic nature as closely as possible, so I provide the 90f under the heater throughout the day and then drop the temp under the heater to 80f on a night. I am not concerned with temps in the rest of the viv 'cause the snake will move to regulate it's own temp. If you are trying to breed then you don't want the snake to warm itself up above the brumation temp, thats why the NTL is important.

Hope this helps.
 

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just a suggestion, you may want to shoot the royal from time to time with the I.R thermometer. when it is in different areas of the cage at different times. compare it's body temp against the air temp and and various areas of the cage, hot side and cold. comparing surface temps with air and body temps will give you a great picture of the thermal qualities of your set up. you may be surprised at the differences. could be interesting.
 

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Never thought of that one Habu. Top fella.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Habu I have to say I was a little shocked when I read the first part of your post about shooting my royal, I calmed down though when I continued to read, lol.
 

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with snakes the surface temp is the most important thats where most of the body heat will be derived from the ambient will effect the behaviour on the surface temps, lower ambient more time on the hotter surface etc etc arboreal species its the opposite obviously there is no surface to derive heat from (unless u use heated perches) so with gtp etb atb etc the ambient is a reflection of the snakes core (not quite but close enough), the best advice i can give, use a thermometer with a long probe taped to the hotspot surface set it using the thermometer's readout not the thermostat dial (use that as a very rough guide only) once ur hotspots at the recommended for the species, corn gopher bulls etc 86 ish, royal bc stuff 92ish after that watch the snake, ur looking for a snake that goes to the heat stays a while (days or hours, depends on feeding bulk of snake etc) then leaves heat and cools down in the cool end, then repeats the whole cycle, watch the snake once ur sure in the ballpark temp and ur snake's wiggling end to end reguarly uv hit the sweetspot, if that makes sense :)
 

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with snakes the surface temp is the most important
Not quite sure I agree with you. The air or ambient temp is what the snake breathes and is partly what causes RI when it's wrong. A rock that the snake is basking on will be way over the air above it. Similarly if you measure the air temp under the heater it will be cooler than the floor under the heater.
 
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