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The past couple of days a few people on this forum have been saying a few things about me needing to do some research (as I clearly DON’T have a bloody clue what the hell I’m talking about!!) I don’t generally make stuff up and pull random comments out of the air to start a feud with lizard lovers on a reptile chat forum!! Lets face it if I wanted a hot debate I’d join a forum dedicated to the war!!! If I have said something to offend all of you then I am genuinely sorry, but everything that I have said, isn’t just something I’ve pulled out of my ear!! Its actually what I am being taught in my job. I have been told first hand by an exotic veterinarian that it is all true!!! Maybe I’m just Gullible and hes lying??? But I don’t think it’s the case as he has published the following article! :?

All I was trying to get across was this and I know that there are LOADS of reputable breeders that don’t use UV (someone I work with quite closely does so) Every one is entitled to their own oppinion, hence the free country! I choose to listen to someone who has had over 20 years clinical experience with the medical side of things than I do the net. that’s my choice He‘s the one with all the contacts and research to back him up…why should‘t I? :?:

The article is a bit technical but it shows that I’m not an misinformed t**t.
:)
Taken from the BSAVA manual of Reptiles (Second Edition) Chapter 21. Nutritional problems. By Ian Calvert( Bsc BVSc Cert Zoo Med MRCVS) (page 289)

Photobiosynthesis of vitamin D
Vitamin D is produced through the action of ultraviolet light on skin. In both reptiles and mammals the crucial wavelengths of light for vitamin D synthesis are 290315 nm (maximal at 297±3), which are part of the UVB section of the electromagnetic spectrum.
UVB converts 7 -dehydrocholesterol (7 -DHC) in the malphigian layer of the skin into pre-vitamin D3; this then undergoes a temperature-sensitive isomerization in the skin to produce vitamin D3. Production of vitamin D3 is extremely slow at suboptimal temperatures, as shown in green iguanas kept below 20°C (Holick et al., 1,995}. There{me both UVB and an adequate skin temperature are crucial for vitamin D biosynthesis.
Differences in the amount of UVB exposure required for optimal vitamin D production have recently been found in lizards. The Texas spiny lizard and the Mediterranean house gecko both have the same quantities of 7-DHC per unit area of skin. However, when exposed to equal amounts of UVB the gecko produced larger quantities of pre-vitamin D3 per unit time than the spiny lizard (Carman et al., 2000) (Figure 21.1). This was a surprising result because it had been assumed that nocturnal reptiles obtained vitamin D from their food. The study showed that geckos can manufacture sufficient vitamin D3 by exposing themselves to the sun for brief periods at dawn or dusk - a crucial behaviour since their invertebrate diet contains virtually no vitamin D. Similarly, sun-dwelling species of anole lizards have skin with poorer photobiosynthetic ability than that possessed by shade-loving anole species (Ferguson et al., unpublished).
Vitamin D3 is photolabile and unless it is rapidly transported into the dermal capilliary bed it undergoes photolysis to suprasterols that are thought to be biologically inert. In humans production of vitamin D3 is limited to no more than 5-15% of the total 7-DHC content in the skin. Excessive exposure to sunlight does not therefore produce toxic levels of vitamin D is being used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I hope you will read this and maybe take back some of the nasty stuff uv all been saying!! as i'm not making it up... but am being told stuff by someone i respect, trust and look up to
 

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Not really sure whats been going on, just had a quick read of some of your posts I presume you are going on about Geckos and them not requiring UV due to being Nocturnal. :lol:
 

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Thats the jist I was getting as well. It does come up now and again about leopards, surely peeps know if its nocturnal how would it get UV as it sleeps until darkness. :lol: :lol:
 

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Leopard Gecko's do not need uv , there are different types of gecko, the leopard gecko is nocturnal, only awake in the dark. Mine get extra vitamins and calcium by dusting thier crickets with a reptile powder.
I dont see the words uv is a must for leopard gecko's , in that statement.
 

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beestingbutterfly

I have read, and could have quoted you that exact same text, and loads more besides.

However, nothing distracts from your original post which stated
Geckos DO need UV light!!!
in response to a question.

Now, I know that question did not specificly ask about leopard geckos, but looking at the posters siggy, it was clear that was the only species of gecko he / she had.

You statement was wrong. fact. end off. And putting up an image regarding calcium supps? we were not even talking about calcium?

I would grant that generaly what you said and the information you posted to back you up is right, but not for leopard geckos. Even your cited text has no mention of leos.

Now, had you have turned round and said that this was what you were being told, we would have acted in a different way, but to be told buy someone that I should go do some research as I was not looking after my animals correctly, when I have over 25 years experiance, rehome for customs, RSPCA, local zoos , committee member of a local society and keep over 40 leos, having just breed over 60 hathclings, of which 45 have been rehomed and the new owners really pleased with them.....

Well, I take that pretty hard and felt a reply was a must.

Btw, I dont use uv on my leos, and Have never lost any of my own due to MDB.

And, may I say, an xray of a beardie with fractures does not automaticly mean that animal has MDB.

And also, just for extra credit, it is possible to keep such an animal as a beardie with no UV at all. You would however need to supplement its diet with a D3 type liquid, cant remember the name, but know this for fact as a breeder mate of mine, and not just a tiny breeder but prob the biggest bdy breeder at least here in the south, tried a test with it.

Anyway, thats all I am gona say on this, I took your reply as an attack on my methods, I have made my reply, as you have yours. Others will have to read both and make thier own minds up.
 

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Why drag this all up again ?

just forget about it, everyone else will.... leopard geckos DO NOT require uv.... im in the same boat as tony, i keep loads leo's of my own... and have produced many many hatchlings this year, non of which have even seen a uv light... some of my females arent far of 80 grams and are imo some of the happiest geckos ever !!!

just admit you where wrong... and stop digging a deeper hole... then forget about it... at the end of the day, we are all here for the same reason.... we love reptiles :D
 
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