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Discussion Starter #1
As the title says (and I'm not holding out much hope) I was wondering if anyone knows much about these snakes ?
I've got two and the lighter one is slightly different to the pictures I can generally find on the net. The darker one is a normal but the other is different in minor ways.

The care will be the same so I'm not asking that, more just if it's a locality species. The books on reptiles of madagascar are fairly dear just to look up one species of snake, especially as they may not even have langaha.




Mike
 

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Wow, those are gorgeous, I've always had a thing for these snakes but never been fortunate enough to keep them for myself.

I don't know anything about subspecies for L. madagascariensis. There are more than one species of Langaha on Madagascar, though. Langaha alluaudi and L. pseudoalluaudi are both extremely rare (only two specimens of the latter have ever been found ). There are also references here and there to "Langaha nasuta" (mostly in older papers and books) but I think that this is an older name for L. madagascariensis.

It is possible that you have one of the rarer species, but I think it more likely that this is just normal colour variation - I've seen pictures of fairly light L. madagascariensis before. What are the differences you mention?

Also, as I'm sure you're aware there is a pronounced sexual dimorphism in this species. It's not quite clear from the photo whether the darker animal is a female (if so she'd have a leaf-shaped "nose") but a darker coloration would also be usual if this were the case (although to be fair they both appear to be males?).

Anyway, how do you find this species to keep? What are you feeding them? I was recently offered a pair but didn't have the cash at the time (NUTS) but I would certainly give this species I try if I had another opportunity. Yours look in great condition too.
:no1:
 

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unreal snakes, I have seen them in books before but never came across anyone that kept them, they really are amazing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes I think nasuta is just an old name. I've seen pic's of pseudoalludi and I want one mainly as it doesn't look the slightest bit real.

The differences are pretty slight but as it's so hard to find out about them, then I am intrigued.
One is the colour, much lighter than any others I've seen.
The other is that the nose appendage instead of being flattened vertically with the serrated edges then it's more rounded over, it may well be nothing but it is different from the other pictures and the other langaha I've seen. Maybe it's an old shed that is caught around the head, then again maybe not. The leaf shaped nose is present in the darker one but in the lighter one you could liken it to the leaf being wrapped around to form an arch.

They are both certainly females, I've seen the males before and they are yellow on top white underneath with a pointed nose. They do look very very different, no real attempt made for camouflage on them unlike the females.

As far as keeping them, usually you need a good supply of feeder lizards, but mainly I've been assist feeding them. I've decided with lizard feeders not to try to wait for them to go to pinkies but to assist them while they have good body weight. If they are going to die of stress then they will do that straight away anyway, but if I wait too long and they waste away then a force feed will stand much less chance of working.
Part of living in nature is stress for small amounts of time, so personally i can't see that being assist fed fairly quickly then released back into a safe enviroment will cause any undue stress, it could be likened to being stalked by a predator then getting away.

Having said that, one tip I was given for awkward force feeders was to cut a pinkie head off and put that in the mouth, hooking it in the teeth. if you try a whole pinkie they will use the weight of the body to pull it out of the mouth, the head only tends not to fall out so after a while they eat it anyway.

The lighter one is an easy assist, once the mouth is closed she will doe the rest herself, she hardly struggles and has even eaten them herself with me lightly restraining her.
The darker one does tend to fight a little more and food has to be massaged down or she will regurge. Having said that at first she would also try to regurge after drinking water, so she may have had worms or something else irritating her throat. Since I have treated her she seems much better and after drinking the water sprayed on her she doesn't try to regurge.

Both came in with very decent body weight, and have been handled very little, though they do sometimes come out onto me by themselves. Since I've had them I've had a 10% body weight increase on both. So things are looking ok.

For the average person I would advise stay well clear of them, for some one experienced with awkward and unusual snakes (say thrasops and the like) then go for it, though as with all, a decent body weight to start with will make the world of difference.

I am now on the lookout for a decent male as breeding these would be great, I know it has been done before but CB ones would be great for people over here.

Mike
 

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Yeah, the feeding method you mention is one I subscribe to myself. With fresh, fussy imports often just a bit of food in them to begin with helps no end further down the line. With difficult snakes like this more often then not I try and assist feed as soon as possible (after a day or two of rehydration, which is probably even more important).

As you say, if the snake is stressed, it's stressed. It doesn't hurt having some food inside it and more often than not will extend the life of imports in poor condition until you can stabilize them properly. If you wait the usual few days/weeks that you might for a CB snake to settle in, you just run the risk of losing a high-metabolism arboreal to loss of body weight. Many of these species (Thrasops, Chrysopelea, Philothamnus, etc.) need meals more frequently than just once a week - usually a smaller meal every three or four days.

Plus as a buyer you have no idea how long the snake has been lingering in a canvas bag with no food or water at the exporters, then the importers, then the pet shop etc. You're right, with snakes like this the condition they arrive in is everything!

Great work, and good luck finding your male!
 

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BTW, I see what you mean about the males! Not having seen this species "in the flesh" before I assumed that the ones you have had "pointy" noses but now I've looked up some photos on the internet you can really see how much "sharper" the males look! Plus you're right, they're not just a lighter brown but really yellow!

Now I REALLY want some of these snakes! :flrt:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I know what you mean, since I first saw my first langaha I wanted one.
They aren't too hard to get hold of, not exactly common in the trade but come up fairly often.

Here's a couple more pictures of the darker female so you can see the head better. I will get around to taking some better pictures sometime.




If you are ever coming over to shropshire then let me know as I could take one to the shop for you to see.

Mike
 
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