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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have recently been interested in getting an axolotl and have been researching them, i was wondering if any keepers of them could give me tips and also how easy would you say they are to keep? How often should the water be changed and what size tank do you suggest? Also have any of you had them turn into salamadars? as i have read that if they get extra iodine they change? thanks :)
 

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ayone wanna help a poor helpless noob?! :whistling2:
 

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i have kept these before and depending on how many you plan to ckeep will depend on tank size i found them fairly easy to keep and they where one of the first animals i choose to keep i like them because they look strange have you got a set-up yet or how many you planning on keeping any other questions and depending on how good your filter is will depend on how often you have to clean them out
 

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imo this is the best axie care sheet around: Axolotls: The Fascinating Mexican Axolotl and the Tiger Salamander theres also a forum at: Beginner Newt, Salamander, Axolotl & Help Topics - Axolotls (<i>Ambystoma mexicanum</i>) at Caudata.org Newt and Salamander Portal

once you've got the tank sorted there easy to keep.

given that they can reach about a foot long when fully grown the minimum tank size is 2ft for one and an extra 1ft per additional axie, they do well in large tanks though so the bigger the better.

for water quality its better to get a good filter. axies are quite messy so they do need a powerfull filter but as they dont like too much moving water its best to get one with a spray bar as it helps cut down on movement.

they can turn into salamanders naturaly but its extreamly rare. adding iodine to the water can cause the change but its extreamely dangerous and can kill the axie. if they survive the metamorphosis they generally dont live as long as a salamander as they would have done if left as an exie. moral of the story: if you want a salamander, buy a salamander : victory:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i have kept these before and depending on how many you plan to ckeep will depend on tank size i found them fairly easy to keep and they where one of the first animals i choose to keep i like them because they look strange have you got a set-up yet or how many you planning on keeping any other questions and depending on how good your filter is will depend on how often you have to clean them out
well i was thinking of getting one or two.. and with a good filter, might have a tank but not 100% sure about it yet if it would be big enough. Thanks for the reply :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
imo this is the best axie care sheet around: Axolotls: The Fascinating Mexican Axolotl and the Tiger Salamander theres also a forum at: Beginner Newt, Salamander, Axolotl & Help Topics - Axolotls (<i>Ambystoma mexicanum</i>) at Caudata.org Newt and Salamander Portal

once you've got the tank sorted there easy to keep.

given that they can reach about a foot long when fully grown the minimum tank size is 2ft for one and an extra 1ft per additional axie, they do well in large tanks though so the bigger the better.

for water quality its better to get a good filter. axies are quite messy so they do need a powerfull filter but as they dont like too much moving water its best to get one with a spray bar as it helps cut down on movement.

they can turn into salamanders naturaly but its extreamly rare. adding iodine to the water can cause the change but its extreamely dangerous and can kill the axie. if they survive the metamorphosis they generally dont live as long as a salamander as they would have done if left as an exie. moral of the story: if you want a salamander, buy a salamander : victory:
brilliant thanks! really helpfull :)
oh no wasnt thinking of turning them just was unsure.. had read a few things and didnt suddenly want to find that i have a salamandar and not the right set up if that makes sence. Thanks again
 

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I keep mine in 3ft fish tanks, 2 in each, couldnt imagine keeoing them in anything smaller and use fluval U3 filters set on low flow.
 

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Join Caudata.org that is where the rest of us axie loving owners are and yes we are on here to!!!

Do not get an underwater filter the waste becomes trapped beneath the substrate and this causes water quality issues. They are also only normally used with gravel which is also a substrate that should not be used for axies!!

Try and get as large a tank as you can as axies can grow to 12 inches, I currently have 2 in a 4ft tank and they are a pleasure to watch!

I currently use a Fluval U3 filter for my 4ft tank and have the water flowing near to the top so it does not cause to much flow.

Temps need to be kept between 18 - 22 ideally and yes although axies are easy to keep they are not so easy on a hot summers day (anything over 24 is stressful and dangerous to them and can even kill them) so be prepared to have fans blowing on your tank unless you have a chiller!

Staple diet should be earthworms and you can also use axolotl pellets.

Substrate should be ideally sand (washed and washed and washed again) or bare bottom!

Provide hides for them & plants, ideally one per axie and ensure you have a screen/mesh top to allow for a cooler tank but to also ensure your axie does not escape (trust me it happens)!

If you need anymore help shout or find me under the same name on Caudata :2thumb:
 
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I had a Fluval 2 for 10 gallons of water. She loved it funny thing, only thing I would advise is keep an eye on your axolotl with it. Some ignore them and are fine, others (like mine) like the current and will 'hug' the filter. If they cling to it they can get their gills and tails caught in the slits and potentially damage themselves, if yours does this then you'll need to create a fine mesh barrier. Undergravel filters aren't great, both my herpetology lecturers liked them for fish but not for axolotls as they can't cope so well with the load. Don't know what anyone's doing with gravel for axolotls anyway, bare, sand or large stones.

Size you have pretty good advice there on it. Furnishings are personal choice, mine stresses out in a bare tank while those used to a bare tank no doubt stress in an enriched tank. They do like somewhere to hide though and a tunnel or bridge works best (I have a tunnel shaped like a crocodile skull lol).

I was also advised that 20cm water depth is ideal. Mine I don't need to worry about a lid as it's a normal aquarium so is twice as deep as the water level. Always leave the tank set up for a week before introducing the axolotl. Also don't use live plants, they could block up the axie and it will destroy them. Feel free to use fake plants but make sure they're secure as they may get bitten.

As for how often for cleaning, my 10 gallon (2ft x 1ft) tank with a Fluval 2 needs the filter cleaned each week (just give the sponge and other parts a quick rinse under the tap, too thorough and you'll wash off the helpful bacteria), part change (20%) every month and full clean twice a year.

Biggest worry you'll likely have is algae and summer heat. If they get too warm in summer the food in their stomachs will go bad. I found that out the second year I had mine, if it's warm put a bottle of cold or frozen water, depending on temperature around, in the tank. Otherwise you could have a floating ill axolotl. Feeding, young need bloodworms but increase the size as they get older. And vary the diet; earthworms, mealworms, liver, chicken breast, flies and pinkies are what mine is fed. Pinkies are invaluable for calcium. I considered fish as a live food but this is illegal and fish are highly likely to carry fungal problems that will affect your axolotl.
 

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I had a Fluval 2 for 10 gallons of water. She loved it funny thing, only thing I would advise is keep an eye on your axolotl with it. Some ignore them and are fine, others (like mine) like the current and will 'hug' the filter. If they cling to it they can get their gills and tails caught in the slits and potentially damage themselves, if yours does this then you'll need to create a fine mesh barrier. Undergravel filters aren't great, both my herpetology lecturers liked them for fish but not for axolotls as they can't cope so well with the load. Don't know what anyone's doing with gravel for axolotls anyway, bare, sand or large stones.

Size you have pretty good advice there on it. Furnishings are personal choice, mine stresses out in a bare tank while those used to a bare tank no doubt stress in an enriched tank. They do like somewhere to hide though and a tunnel or bridge works best (I have a tunnel shaped like a crocodile skull lol).

I was also advised that 20cm water depth is ideal. Mine I don't need to worry about a lid as it's a normal aquarium so is twice as deep as the water level. Always leave the tank set up for a week before introducing the axolotl. Also don't use live plants, they could block up the axie and it will destroy them. Feel free to use fake plants but make sure they're secure as they may get bitten.

As for how often for cleaning, my 10 gallon (2ft x 1ft) tank with a Fluval 2 needs the filter cleaned each week (just give the sponge and other parts a quick rinse under the tap, too thorough and you'll wash off the helpful bacteria), part change (20%) every month and full clean twice a year.

Biggest worry you'll likely have is algae and summer heat. If they get too warm in summer the food in their stomachs will go bad. I found that out the second year I had mine, if it's warm put a bottle of cold or frozen water, depending on temperature around, in the tank. Otherwise you could have a floating ill axolotl. Feeding, young need bloodworms but increase the size as they get older. And vary the diet; earthworms, mealworms, liver, chicken breast, flies and pinkies are what mine is fed. Pinkies are invaluable for calcium. I considered fish as a live food but this is illegal and fish are highly likely to carry fungal problems that will affect your axolotl.
The only thing I would add to that is that it is better to rinse the media in tank water; tap water kills off too much of the bacteria.
 

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An under-gravel filter really won't work well in an axie tank. Axies should not be kept on gravel as they will eat anything that fits in their mouths and gravel in their stomachs can become impacted and cause problems. Axies are best kept on sand or bare bottomed tanks. I run my tanks with sponge filters. They are cheap, easy to find and don't produce any current.
 

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I had a Fluval 2 for 10 gallons of water. She loved it funny thing, only thing I would advise is keep an eye on your axolotl with it. Some ignore them and are fine, others (like mine) like the current and will 'hug' the filter. If they cling to it they can get their gills and tails caught in the slits and potentially damage themselves, if yours does this then you'll need to create a fine mesh barrier. Undergravel filters aren't great, both my herpetology lecturers liked them for fish but not for axolotls as they can't cope so well with the load. Don't know what anyone's doing with gravel for axolotls anyway, bare, sand or large stones.

Size you have pretty good advice there on it. Furnishings are personal choice, mine stresses out in a bare tank while those used to a bare tank no doubt stress in an enriched tank. They do like somewhere to hide though and a tunnel or bridge works best (I have a tunnel shaped like a crocodile skull lol).

I was also advised that 20cm water depth is ideal. Mine I don't need to worry about a lid as it's a normal aquarium so is twice as deep as the water level. Always leave the tank set up for a week before introducing the axolotl. Also don't use live plants, they could block up the axie and it will destroy them. Feel free to use fake plants but make sure they're secure as they may get bitten.

As for how often for cleaning, my 10 gallon (2ft x 1ft) tank with a Fluval 2 needs the filter cleaned each week (just give the sponge and other parts a quick rinse under the tap, too thorough and you'll wash off the helpful bacteria), part change (20%) every month and full clean twice a year.

Biggest worry you'll likely have is algae and summer heat. If they get too warm in summer the food in their stomachs will go bad. I found that out the second year I had mine, if it's warm put a bottle of cold or frozen water, depending on temperature around, in the tank. Otherwise you could have a floating ill axolotl. Feeding, young need bloodworms but increase the size as they get older. And vary the diet; earthworms, mealworms, liver, chicken breast, flies and pinkies are what mine is fed. Pinkies are invaluable for calcium. I considered fish as a live food but this is illegal and fish are highly likely to carry fungal problems that will affect your axolotl.
Sorry but disagree with some of the above!!!

Algae should not be a big problem unless your tank is in direct sunlight which it should not be anyway! You can also help this along by using a background which wraps around the sides if you do have an extra light room!

You can use a frozen bottle in the water but it is not the most effective due to dropping temperatures fairly quickly and then temps rising again once ice has melted inside the bottle, also if you are at work you have noway of monitoring it!! I find a clip on fan works wonders on a tank, angle it so it blows across the water, this is much more effective!

Axies dont need bloodworms their staple diet should be earthworms UNLESS they are very very small juvies but even then they would much prefer chopped up or very very small worms! Also bloodworms foul tank water quickly and are a pain in the *** to clear up afterwards!

Mealworms are also not recommended, they need their heads squashed before feeding and the chitin is not easily digested by the axie! Flies again, sorry but I would say no, why would you want to feed your axie flies?? Pinkies, yes have heard some people feed those but not often, again I stress and repeat EARTHWORMS ARE THE STAPLE AND BEST DIET!!!

Hope this helps!
 
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Join Caudata.org that is where the rest of us axie loving owners are and yes we are on here to!!!
Another Caudata user? I'm Shadow on there, however I rarely visit the Axolotl section.
 

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Another Caudata user? I'm Shadow on there, however I rarely visit the Axolotl section.
LOL yes there are loads of us on here aswell :) I am zoezakella on there to!
 

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LOL yes there are loads of us on here aswell :) I am zoezakella on there to!
I'm guessing you stick to the Axolotl section? Or do you keep other Caudates? : victory:
 

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I'm guessing you stick to the Axolotl section? Or do you keep other Caudates? : victory:
No I look at all of it :)

I have cynops pyrrhogaster (japanese fire bellied newts) aswell as axies :2thumb:
 
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