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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi Guys
I see alot of threads asking (what is the best beginner snake?)
So im making this thread to show you some of the all time best beginner snakes.


Corn Snake



Many people are advised from Pet shops that these are the best beginner snakes. In one word YES these are great for beginners especially kids. They are highly unlikey to bite and have pleasant personalities. When threatened their first response is to hide rather than strike and they will occasionally warn of predators with a little tail rattling. They come in many colours & patterns (Morphs) which are available alot of the time. Adults get between 4-6ft.


King Snake



Kingsnakes are one of the easiest snakes to care for. They don’t grow too large and are not very aggressive.
They are known to be nocturnal species. They can be a very fast snake when young but with regular handling will soon calm down and slow down a lot more. Adults get between 2-4ft they rarely get 7ft.


Milk Snake



Milk Snakes are one the most popular snakes kept as a pet due to their bright colors and easy going temperaments. As juveniles they display intensely colored patterns and as the mature some of these colors will fade. Adults get between 2-4ft.


Children's python



Children's pythons are the second smallest python in the world.
When they are young, Chidren's Pythons are generally reddish-brown with dark brown patches or spots. As they age, these patterns fade resulting in a mostly dark brown to black snake with many older snakes showing no pattern at all. Adults get between 2-4ft

Spotted python



I would class Spotted Pythons as easy to care for. They grow to a manageable size and have no special lighting or humidity requirements. During daylight hours they will usually be hidden away. After lights out they are usually very active snakes, utilising every inch of space you can provide for them. They are good climbers and will appreciate branches etc that you can provide for them. Adults get between 3-4ft


Ball python aka Royal python



They are brightly coloured, stocky snakes and there are now albino and many different colour and patterens (Morphs) available. They are docile and can be shy and very reluctant to bite. They achieved the name ball python because of their habit of curling into a ball if threatened. Some can be picky eaters. Adults get between 4-6ft


Hognose snake



Hognose snakes are small, robust, prairie snakes with an unusual face. This, with the fact that they are mainly burrowers by nature and have opportunistic feeding habits, make them fascinating snakes which are a welcome addition to any snake collection. Some breeders reckon that these snakes, especially rarer colour and pattern (Morphs) are becoming increasingly popular in the pet trade. Hognoses are also tough and very easy to care for. Hognose snakes are rear fanged and are venomous but they won't kill you. Adults get between 2-4ft




There is alot more but im going to bed :lol2:

Daniel : victory:
 

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quick scim of the post, BUT shouldnt you mention to begginers that hognoses are rear fanged and are venomous? :lol2:
 

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How about these for something a bit more off the wall?

Xenochrophis vittata






Easy-peasy - don't require high temps, only grow to 18" or so, they like to climb, they like to swim (just imagine the possibilities for a fully-planted semi-aquatic setup/ arboreal setup) and are easy to breed. Not to mention they can be kept in groups, never bite and eat fish, which are dead cheap to buy in bulk as f/t.

Or how about:

Dione's Rat Snake Elaphe dione (the specimen pictured is E.d. taeniata)



Very gentle and good-natured little snakes, but require a long brumation.

Francis
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How about these for something a bit more off the wall?

Xenochrophis vittata

image


image

Easy-peasy - don't require high temps, only grow to 18" or so, they like to climb, they like to swim (just imagine the possibilities for a fully-planted semi-aquatic setup/ arboreal setup) and are easy to breed. Not to mention they can be kept in groups, never bite and eat fish, which are dead cheap to buy in bulk as f/t.

Or how about:

Dione's Rat Snake Elaphe dione (the specimen pictured is E.d. taeniata)

image

Very gentle and good-natured little snakes, but require a long brumation.

Francis
Thanks for the helping hand on beginner snakes bud

Daniel: victory:
 

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No such thing as a starter snake. Any non-venomous can be a 1st snake as long as you put in the time to research.
 

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:blowup:

Yes, but how long it lasts will depend entirely on the experience of the keeper.

It's all well and good saying that something like a WC Gonyosoma can be a first starter snake. Of course it can, anybody can buy one, but somebody who hasn't gained the experience to maintain it properly is almost definitely not going to have it for very long...

Or are you implying that a rank novice can just go out and buy any snake they choose and expect it to thrive with no prior knowledge and experience? Research is all very good and commendable, to be sure, but hard-earned experience and finding things out the hard way are worth far more in my eyes.
 

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Also ... cornsnakes can get quite boring very quickly for someone who may be looking for an actual "proper snake" so to speak .... (am not wanting to thread on anyone's toes or upset anyone at all but sometimes corns are not the actual ideal beginner snake for some as some people prefer a little more shall I say 'bite' or personality/challenge than what a corn snake has to offer).........
 

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Discussion Starter #14
:blowup:

Yes, but how long it lasts will depend entirely on the experience of the keeper.

It's all well and good saying that something like a WC Gonyosoma can be a first starter snake. Of course it can, anybody can buy one, but somebody who hasn't gained the experience to maintain it properly is almost definitely not going to have it for very long...

Or are you implying that a rank novice can just go out and buy any snake they choose and expect it to thrive with no prior knowledge and experience? Research is all very good and commendable, to be sure, but hard-earned experience and finding things out the hard way are worth far more in my eyes.
Well said bud

Daniel: victory:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Also ... cornsnakes can get quite boring very quickly for someone who may be looking for an actual "proper snake" so to speak .... (am not wanting to thread on anyone's toes or upset anyone at all but sometimes corns are not the actual ideal beginner snake for some as some people prefer a little more shall I say 'bite' or personality/challenge than what a corn snake has to offer).........
This thread is mainly aimed at kids tbh

Daniel: victory:
 

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This thread is mainly aimed at kids tbh

Daniel: victory:
lol but even kids can get bored of cornsnakes too ... it's like recommending a G. rosea to the tarantula world.... slow, don't do anything, hardly move ever .... even some children prefer something more interesting and challenging .... and kids do tend to lose interest in boring things pretty quickly ... a neonate BCI for example isnt going to grow too quickly for a child unless it's powerfed.. n even if it is it's more likely to get fat in girth more than grow in length .......

Do u get what I mean? Corns arent the ideal beginner for everyone ... well done for a nice thread but.... some people prefer something a little more challenging ... even kids .............
 

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lol but even kids can get bored of cornsnakes too ... it's like recommending a G. rosea to the tarantula world.... slow, don't do anything, hardly move ever .... even some children prefer something more interesting and challenging .... and kids do tend to lose interest in boring things pretty quickly ... a neonate BCI for example isnt going to grow too quickly for a child unless it's powerfed.. n even if it is it's more likely to get fat in girth more than grow in length .......

Do u get what I mean? Corns arent the ideal beginner for everyone ... well done for a nice thread but.... some people prefer something a little more challenging ... even kids .............
Hence why this isn't a thread on why corn snakes are the best beginner snakes for everyone. The OP gave various options. And even a 4-5ft boa is a very strong snake for a child, wouldn't recommend it personally. I think hand in hand with corns you could put most north american rats anyway, yellows, blacks, everglades...
 

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I like this, good idea. I think it could use a little more information about each snake (potential problems like non feeding royals for example) or maybe a link to a good care sheet for each animal. Seems like it'd be worthy of stickying to stop some of the mass "first snake" posts. Not that anyone will look at a sticky anyway. :bash:
 

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As I've said before on here, I reckon most feeding problems with Royals are actually husbandry mistakes. When I first got into snakes I couldn't get my Royals to eat. After moving them out of massive vivs into RUBs, getting stats and such sorted out they became no problem. I've kept every Royal I've had since the same way and they've all been excellent feeders. I'm not saying you won't still get some that just refuse to eat though...

I also wouldn't say they are necessarily the best snakes for kids. Kids are probably more likely to want to handle the snake, and stress it out, which might cause other problems. For kids I'd suggest the others you've mentioned: and one you haven't

GARTERS!!!

Red Sided Garter

San Francisco Garter

Common Garter (I think)


They were the corns of days gone by...
 
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