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Discussion Starter #1
Hello every one, i though i would do a thread on how to culturing springtails and what works best for you?
i have tryed a couple of ways both soil based myself, air tight and just a normal push on lid, im trying to get rammed cultures, i have 4 air tight containers 10L, and 4 with push on lids 3L which i have found works best for me. kept humid, and fed once a week but containers opened every 2 days. The food i give them is a mix to powder blend of... fish flakes, carp pellets, potato flakes, now and then sliced mushrooms, and cuttle fish.
again this is a thread to see what works best for you, NOT the best way as every one is to there own.
half mine (the 3L tubs are kept at 75oF and 10L at room temp which im un sure and will check)
ill upload pictures when i can get time to show mine, i have seen rammed cultures which mine are not as good as, which is the reason im doing this thread)
thanks in advance for every ones input, any tips would be greatful!!
Also i know there are 2 true springtail types, not 100% sure but i think mine are tropical.

:no1:
 

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Talk to Stu (Soundstounite) on here, and also check out the Feeder section further down the site page. I have them in all my tanks, but this is more by luck than design- I don't deliberately culture them, whereas serious dart-keepers do.
 

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ADR and Mike seem to do well with their springtail cultures.
Oh cheers Adam :whistling2:

It`s quite simple really.
Feed em and breed em :2thumb:
Eco earth, orchid bark or charcoal.
It`s your choice.
Feed them with yeast and keep them miles away from fly cultures to keep mites away from them.

Mike
 

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I have 3 large cultures with mixed tropical and European species.
Substrate is coir, horticultural balls, leaf litter and orchid bark mix.
About half inch of water in the bottom.
I feed with a mix of yeast and porridge.
They are kept in a warm room on a high shelf and breed very well.
 

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I have 3 large cultures with mixed tropical and European species.
Substrate is coir, horticultural balls, leaf litter and orchid bark mix.
About half inch of water in the bottom.
I feed with a mix of yeast and porridge.
They are kept in a warm room on a high shelf and breed very well.
That's really interesting- conventional wisdom says culture each species seperately, to avoid predation or over-competition- but it obviously works for you. I have both native and tropical species of springtails and woodlice in practically all of my vivs, and they do fine, but I'd pretty much assumed this was down to a wider, more varied habitat and lower population. I'm mildly fascinated by the mixed-up ecosystem this makes, though.
 

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ADR and Mike seem to do well with their springtail cultures.

I hope we all (dart guys) are doing well with 'em Adam : victory:Couple in the fact you've done this a while so tell me what ya know dude:Na_Na_Na_Na:,



Ron, Davey has seen the earlier stages of our charcoal springtail cultures,I think some are closing on a year old now,this technique with my present knowledge would be my personal recommendation for anyone.


To possibly add to your thread Dave I believe we are culturing 3 geni Folsumia ( temperate) Seira and Sinella (tropical). The Sinella are smaller and very prolific,but we do great with the others as well. I would say the sinella like it driest then the Seira and folsumia like it wet. We feed just yeast and a CA supply in the form of cuttlefish bone. For me the secrets of high production is absolute diligence in regular water change outs and a regular misting which I think plays hell with any mites that get into a culture,plus mite paper(naturally:whistling2:).

I also play around with some smaller cultures peat for folsumia co co fibre for sinella,I can't get anywhere near the same productivity from a Seira culture on subs in small cultures so don't bother with them now. I need alot of springs all the time so for us the big culture is simply more effective all ways.

Charcoal take time to set up with all the washing and boiling, but once going they DO for me. I've tried a multitude of food stuffs for springs,but the simple approach of yeast is just nailing it,time after time,I feel little need now to quest for better,although I probably will because that's me:bash:.

Oh Davey before I run off check out me mate Glenn from canuck land he of the name frogfreak,he has posted here,I have more than a hunch we have much to learn from his methods,some of which I still want to delve into
best
Stu
 
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I have used charcoal and an ecco earth, orchid bark mix. Both do well but my preference like Stu and Mike is also for charcoal as if find them easier to harvest.

By the way my first post was meant to read Ade and Mike. Ruddy predictive text!!!!:lol2:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah I have got the active yeast the Allison one, stu what do you do just whip it with little rain water or bottled water to a paste and do little drabs about the culture? :2thumb: thanks every one
 

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Yeah I have got the active yeast the Allison one, stu what do you do just whip it with little rain water or bottled water to a paste and do little drabs about the culture? :2thumb: thanks every one
cheers Adam ,do you use yeast as well?
Davey mist the charcoal so it is wet ,then pour little piles on the big bits of charcoal that you have put up top,these are then used to feed out. The yeast will stick to the charcoal stopping it going everywhere. Then mist the little piles to moisten them up and make the food soluble for the springtails. you'll probably find it easiest to pour from a nearly empty yeast container,well more accurate anyway. Oh mate date the culture when you start and also write when you change the water on this lable,it's easy to loose track of when you do these things,it's definitely worth dating each culture/waterchange,just makes life easy.

Mike are you still using the allinson's yeast as well?
best

Stu
 

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cheers Adam ,do you use yeast as well?
Davey mist the charcoal so it is wet ,then pour little piles on the big bits of charcoal that you have put up top,these are then used to feed out. The yeast will stick to the charcoal stopping it going everywhere. Then mist the little piles to moisten them up and make the food soluble for the springtails. you'll probably find it easiest to pour from a nearly empty yeast container,well more accurate anyway. Oh mate date the culture when you start and also write when you change the water on this lable,it's easy to loose track of when you do these things,it's definitely worth dating each culture/waterchange,just makes life easy.

Mike are you still using the allinson's yeast as well?
best

Stu
No I have not tried the yeast but may give it a go. I tend to feed them with fish food or springtail food from Dartfrog but I think the yeast may be a more cost effective method.

Adam
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Right stu, couple of questions how do I do a water change with out tipping every thing out? Do I need to do a drainage hole at the bottom of the culture? Where do you get plain charcoal from? Ill have to look around but I'm guessing most places have easy light charcoal that's had chemicals on so guessing that's a big no no, but in sure as I have not looked around yet. Cheers mate
 

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Right stu, couple of questions how do I do a water change with out tipping every thing out? Do I need to do a drainage hole at the bottom of the culture? Where do you get plain charcoal from? Ill have to look around but I'm guessing most places have easy light charcoal that's had chemicals on so guessing that's a big no no, but in sure as I have not looked around yet. Cheers mate
'Turkey Baster!'
 

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'Turkey Baster!'
these things are becoming hard to find.... i needed one last weekend as my old one went missing (young lad decided to play out in the garden with it:devil:) i looked at tesco no luck was told they have stoped stocking them as they have these silicone brushes now....

tryied b&m no luck there and also went to dunhum mills not 1 baster in sight

anyway i found the last one in milton keynes in the local morrisons but it seems now a days these handy multi functional devices are disapearing
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Got the charcoal and all set up hopefully they hit off, any one record temperature that's works well? I'm thinking 70/75F I got few turkey basters so all good there. Added yeast. Stu do you feed once a week or twice? Cheers
 

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:lol2: Adam went there:gasp: and he's bang on so is Mike:2thumb: the reason for pointing you at Glenn's thread and method was the flood and harvest method and his genius use of a tap to remove excess water.Oh Davey a bloody big lump of charcoal in a corner(on set up):whistling2: pull that and water change is a doddle
Dave they need feeding as they need it,eg just as they have eaten the last of the grub ,or you'll get problems with mould.
Davey you can buy the non lighting charcoal from morrisons(petrol ),there are other sources,but you need just plain hardwood charcoal avoid the easy lighting like the plague, it is abit early for barbeque so supplies will be short at the mo.

If you want to go there the best and most eco freindly is to make your own using native hardwoods,ie oak ash hazel,you need a very slow burn plus air exclusion...get a good fire going with these woods and then heap turf on top to exclude air...it is an art form ,but definitely doable oak has a reluctance to burn(actually untreated, it beats uk house building fire regs) but with the RIGHT fire it is an asset for our needs here

Dane search specialist cookery shops maybe amazon?

Oh, Adam the reason for yeast is not all about maximum production,well it is...but it isn't:lol2:: anything that contains grain has the capacity to attract grain mites,so although one might get good short term results the mites if they get to a culture might knock the long term figure for six,ie if Stu needs 2,376 and 3/4:blush: springs per week tis no good having 5000 one week and 300 the next yeast seems to !!!!!!!! give the most stable figures on a week in week out basis over alot of cultures in the long term Plus no risks of OD on tocoperols. Buddy I'll repeat you have been doing this longer than any of us I don't feel anything other than being a beginner compared to you,Ive just based my methods on what knowledge I can squeeze out of folks that breed hundreds of frogs and applied this to my/our scaled down version this method works week in week out. It is NOT the only method,but using it my 3 good!!! starter cultures are capable now of feeding huge numbers of darts,even darts like tincs and auratus that need proper quantity is effortless,ha ok effortless with abit of good ol' head down grafting that is.
Simply put it works
One might just up the anti with nutritional yeast,as a foot note,the guy that told me that has never BS me i utterly trust him
good luck

Stu
 
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