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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The vet phoned me up and said theres worm eggs =[ i tohught shed b okay cuz she eats pretty well but no.... he said to take her in and he has to shove a tube down her throat etc.

I asked if there was nothing i could just feed her but he said theres no way to guarantee the removal or dosage.

I figure i will take her in and get her cleared for sure, but for the future when i do a routine worming, id much rather she didnt have to endure an impatient vet after a dogs just barked down her ear.

Is there a good pill that anyone can reccomend for a young russian?????????????????????????????

ive only seen one product so far in my search and it looks like you still have to syringe it down her throat urself.
 

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Pumpkin is a natural wormer, or so i've read it on here. If it's not too late to get one from somewhere?!
 

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You can get the Panacur (which my vet uses for worming) and put it on his food, although that's assuming that you can guarantee that he will eat all of the food that you put it on. I recently had my russian wormed and the vet didn't stick a tube down his throat, she just squirted it into his mouth and he swallowed it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You can get the Panacur (which my vet uses for worming) and put it on his food, although that's assuming that you can guarantee that he will eat all of the food that you put it on. I recently had my russian wormed and the vet didn't stick a tube down his throat, she just squirted it into his mouth and he swallowed it.
that doesnt sound so bad... i'll see wat happens anyway but thx for the name of that.


poor tort. i really hoped shed of been wormed @ the pet shop. shady aint they. her bed base box will cheer her up when its finished.
 

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The vet was going to tube our torts but then decided against it and gave us some panacur and told what dosage was required.

We put the panacur on a couple of pellets, let it soak in and then fed them the pellets before we fed them anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The vet was going to tube our torts but then decided against it and gave us some panacur and told what dosage was required.

We put the panacur on a couple of pellets, let it soak in and then fed them the pellets before we fed them anything else.
This is for sure my preferred method to any tubing, it seems far fetched to have to do that unless other methods failed.


After she takes the medication will i have to go back to the vet again with another excretion sample?
 

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This is for sure my preferred method to any tubing, it seems far fetched to have to do that unless other methods failed.


After she takes the medication will i have to go back to the vet again with another excretion sample?
We gave two doses over two weeks, left it for a further two weeks without dosing, took another sample in and thankfully it came back clear.
 

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Mine have had 2 doses of panacur and tubed for it both times. My vet was excellent with them, really took his time and just waited until they decided to investigate the tube for themselves and opened their mouths to take a bite, then slipped the tube down with ease. It probably took him a good 10 minutes with each tort. There was no obviuos distress caused to the torts. I didn't find it distressing either but I suppose that's because I'm a paediatric nurse and used to passing tubes on children of all ages.
 

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Mine have had 2 doses of panacur and tubed for it both times. My vet was excellent with them, really took his time and just waited until they decided to investigate the tube for themselves and opened their mouths to take a bite, then slipped the tube down with ease. It probably took him a good 10 minutes with each tort. There was no obviuos distress caused to the torts. I didn't find it distressing either but I suppose that's because I'm a paediatric nurse and used to passing tubes on children of all ages.

I would never risk a hit and miss approach with tubing. My vet always looks very carefully what she is doing when performing this procedure, as I do myself. If a tortoise was to be startled by the sudden approach and take a breath then the tube could easily go down the windpipe and drown the tortoise. It is wise to make absolutely sure the windpipe (opening visible on back of tongue) is closed and the tube is passed along the top of the pallette to avoid an accident. Just in case anyone decides to have a go ;)
In any case with panacur there is no need to tube it, as it can be popped straight into the mouth as it does not cause a gag reflex the same as some wormers do ;)
 

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The vet didn't take a hit and miss approach Sue. He took his time and passed it correctly, it wasn't just shoved in quickly when the tort opened his mouth. As I'm sure you are aware torts open their mouths quite wide and you can easily see to the back it, at least mine do!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
aww, ive read that torts can go on with parasites in the wild fine but if the tort becomes sick the population suddenly excels passing on to other hosts.

I think its definately best to worm them though captive. no matter how much the cost or distress to owner/animals ;]

And if you get another tort, make sure you quarantine and dont pass anything on to you're other torts!

I've read that indoor torts are much less likely to get parasites, but a good diet is essential to keeping a parasite population at a minimum with fiber in their digestive and immune systems.

So if you're worming those pesky critters out, feed some high fibre foods no doubt. Removal of faeces is also very high priority indoors when worming

and i would reccomend you encourage them to do their waste in the water at dawn and quickly change the water

for anyone else in a similar predicament =]

I've also read its highly reccomended to follow you're vets advice, although i had my doubts as he told me hes no tort expert and sees one or two a year.
 

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What???????

You seem to be showing your inexperience here.

I do agree that panacure is easily administered... but... as I've said time and again... worms are not the problem... protozoa are.

I would never risk a hit and miss approach with tubing. My vet always looks very carefully what she is doing when performing this procedure, as I do myself. If a tortoise was to be startled by the sudden approach and take a breath then the tube could easily go down the windpipe and drown the tortoise. It is wise to make absolutely sure the windpipe (opening visible on back of tongue) is closed and the tube is passed along the top of the pallette to avoid an accident. Just in case anyone decides to have a go ;)
In any case with panacur there is no need to tube it, as it can be popped straight into the mouth as it does not cause a gag reflex the same as some wormers do ;)
 

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What???????

You seem to be showing your inexperience here.

I do agree that panacure is easily administered... but... as I've said time and again... worms are not the problem... protozoa are.


There is no need to be rude Ed. I was 'trained' how to do this by an exotics vet who passed all the comments I made in my post. I am sorry that my 20+ years inexperience showed through. As we know protozoa can be treated in exactly the same way but without a faecal it's really not wise 'in my experience' to state that anyone's particular animals definately have protozoa, as metronidazole has a far greater chance of compromosing the immune system than panacur if used when not needed.
Hope this helps
 

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Well... sorry...

How does Metronidozole compromise the imune system? Imported animals have a very hig chance of carrying protozoa and they don't always show up in a fecal exam. the risk far outweighs the benefit.

There is no need to be rude Ed. I was 'trained' how to do this by an exotics vet who passed all the comments I made in my post. I am sorry that my 20+ years inexperience showed through. As we know protozoa can be treated in exactly the same way but without a faecal it's really not wise 'in my experience' to state that anyone's particular animals definately have protozoa, as metronidazole has a far greater chance of compromosing the immune system than panacur if used when not needed.
Hope this helps
 

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Would that be the same metronidazole that is given to humans with gut problems? If so I have some here, wouldn't know where to start a dosing regime though!
Of course I wouldn't just give him it without the advice of the vet, i'll see what they say on Tuesday.

Oh and metronidazole does not compromise the immune system although it will dramatically change the natural balance of gut flora and good bacteria, again something that would need to be weighed up before use.
 

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Well... sorry...

How does Metronidozole compromise the imune system? Imported animals have a very hig chance of carrying protozoa and they don't always show up in a fecal exam. the risk far outweighs the benefit.

It really depends on what other underlying problem there may be. For instance several years back a huge shipment of horsfields came into the UK. Many of these tortoises were obviously sick and passing vast amounts of the smelliest loose faeces you have ever seen. These tortoises went to various points in the UK to be distributed to new carers following assessment and treatment by professionals. I took four of the last to go, fairly weak little things and eating sporadically when coaxed but not in true horsfield style. Many of the ones going to well known 'organisations' died. Vets were screaming to treat with metronidazole/flagyl as a matter of course and some were still dying. Not wanting mine to be amongst the next to go, I took them to my vet who stated emphatically not to go down this route until strict faecal tests had been done, as if carrying any drug resistant disease, recovery could be at best compromised and at worst ending in fatality. She tested them there and then and came up with what looked like an unusual oocyst. The faecals were then sent to a more specialist laboratory to be certain of the findings and the tortoises were found to have cryptosporidium. Very close monitoring and removal of substrate on a daily basis was recommended and my tortoises eventually stopped shedding oocysts and went on to become healthy adults producing healthy babies. Had their immune systems been compromised while the cryptosporidium was active I may well not have these tortoises now.
Hope this helps
 

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Oh and metronidazole does not compromise the immune system although it will dramatically change the natural balance of gut flora and good bacteria, again something that would need to be weighed up before use.

As already mentioned, this depends greatly on what underlying problems there may be. It's a bit like a human undergoing chemotherapy etc. Drug regimes have to be worked out extremely sensitively to ensure that they do not compromise the system more than is absolutely necessary and with the ultimate result of causing more trouble than you had in the first place. As you say, it needs to be carefully weighed up before use. With an animal suffering some incurable disease the whole system can be compromised as many have found to their cost.
 

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Having a good bit of experience with imported animals... the benefit far outweighs the benefit.

I still don't see how Flagyl compromises the immune system. It is also a good antibiotic.



It really depends on what other underlying problem there may be. For instance several years back a huge shipment of horsfields came into the UK. Many of these tortoises were obviously sick and passing vast amounts of the smelliest loose faeces you have ever seen. These tortoises went to various points in the UK to be distributed to new carers following assessment and treatment by professionals. I took four of the last to go, fairly weak little things and eating sporadically when coaxed but not in true horsfield style. Many of the ones going to well known 'organisations' died. Vets were screaming to treat with metronidazole/flagyl as a matter of course and some were still dying. Not wanting mine to be amongst the next to go, I took them to my vet who stated emphatically not to go down this route until strict faecal tests had been done, as if carrying any drug resistant disease, recovery could be at best compromised and at worst ending in fatality. She tested them there and then and came up with what looked like an unusual oocyst. The faecals were then sent to a more specialist laboratory to be certain of the findings and the tortoises were found to have cryptosporidium. Very close monitoring and removal of substrate on a daily basis was recommended and my tortoises eventually stopped shedding oocysts and went on to become healthy adults producing healthy babies. Had their immune systems been compromised while the cryptosporidium was active I may well not have these tortoises now.
Hope this helps
 
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