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Discussion Starter #1
A few shots of Boiga cyanea - this one is really inquisitive, and has a typical hatchling Boiga temperament! Feeding regularly on pinks but determined to have a fight with them first!

Last of all a picture of an adult male - (this ones dad) - showing a bit of blue.

For those who haven't met these - adults are fully green - the colour transforms as they get older.

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Stunning! Aren't they just the sweetest looking things as babies?Cute still as adults,but as hatchlings......
 

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Stunning!!

What are they like to keep?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have mine in a humid arboreal set up and they have thrived and produced - female gravid again - they are so thin the egg shapes are really obvious in the females body - you can count them accurately by eye before they are laid!

Incubation has been tricky. Eggs are 'thick shelled' and take around 100 days. I am changing conditions to raise hatch rates at present as I have lost fully formed snakes in the egg - any advice would be appreciated here!

It is suggested that the natural diet being birds and lizards means that a diet (in captivity) of rodents causes eggs to have larger amounts of calcium than normal and that the young snakes simply cannot get out of highly calcified eggs.

Some routinely cut the eggs - this however is exceptionally risky and I don't. Others say covering the eggs with damp moss helps. Some say they should be kept in the dark! I am open to all suggestions.

I handle mine rarely and they are settled and fine when I do. They are, like most Boiga, very different at night and become much more alert and interested in any movement. The adults take mice from tongs quite gently when offered, although my hatchlings tend to strike and feed only when they grab a pink and therefore take a few minutes.

I have never been bitten, and haven't seen much literature on them, so couldn't comment on the venom - I'd doubt if it amounts to much as their much bigger relatives have just come off DWA. I don't plan to find out!
 

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As regards to the Venom this is what they advise on Boiga Zone Website:

They have two fangs in the upper rear of their mouth, which deliver a venom containing neurotoxins, making them unsuitable pets for most people, especially those who are inexperienced with aggressive snakes. Although no fatalities are known at present, it is important to seek medical assistance if bitten and symptoms such as nausea, dizziness, headache, droopy eyelids, difficulty walking or with balance, numbness, breathing or swallowing difficulties are experienced. Generally a boiga would need to open its mouth very wide to get its rear fangs to sink in well enough and be allowed to chew in the venom,, in order to effectively deliver its venom. Handling tools such as hooks and tongs are advised. People who have allergic reactions to bee stings or insect bites are cautioned to avoid handling rear-fanged species.

Have you any pics of the adults and their set-up?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I use plastic plants and fake vines and an all glass vivarium with access from the front which I mist regulary or include containers of wet moss if I want to stimulate mating - which works well. Combinations of lighting and placement of water produce a humidity gradient. At present humidity is high and a container of moss is present as I am expected eggs.

Here is the whole thing to give an idea of the arrangement and the humidity. I must stress that this is a little higher than usual at present for the reasons stated but not much - I always maintain a gradient if possible. This requires a lots of spot cleaning but ensures good sloughing which can bea problem otherwise



Here is the male - choosing to perch as usual.



As for the venom - it is always wise to look at worst case scenarios and I think the site Boiga Zone describes those very well.

False water cobras have been described as having very little likelihood of serious outcomes after a bite (and I was tagged by a large one when I was a lot younger and suffered nothing more than a little extended bleeding). The eminent John Foden compared his FWC bite to that of a timber rattlesnake - although he had been through treatmment for bites so had a different blood chemistry to the average human.

It is very difficult to predict rear-fanged snake bite outcomes as they are poorly studied (apart from the boomslang and a perhaps couple of others).

As I said idon't want to be the first to find out!
 

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WOW Gorgeous 8) Look at those eyes :)
 

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Wow! Have been looking into getting a spotted some point soon and this has only aided my decision! :no1:
Ben
 

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Pics loaded slow and thought they were gonna be shite piccys but wow, they are GREAT pics well done, and one ausome snake! :no1: :)
 
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