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Pets are a luxury!!!
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As Im sure people are aware I have got a Rottie Pup Kai(age 18 weeks). I also have 11 other dogs.3 of these are castrated males and 8 are spayed bitches.My new boy will also be castrated but what are other peoples opinions on the right age.My 3 little boys where done at 7 months and as far as I can remember they were fine(now 5yrs,9years, 9years)Some people say 10 months some 6 months some 12 months.Advice please as I want to make sure that Kai is done at the best age( possibly the younger the better?)All views welcome:blush:
 

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Now i've been told that it is very important that you let the dog mature first so when hes about 2years. However i never intended to get my dog castrated, sadly when he was 7years old he started mouting my spayed bitch frequently for no reason, and after a week i was near kicking him out.

Marina:)
 

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I think it largely depends on the dog and his behaviour. Ive always been under the impression that if you have a nervous dog then you should wait until they are a bit older as there is a risk of worsening the behaviour. Not sure if there are any reasons to wait longer in bigger breeds though.
 

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it will really depend when your vet prefers to do it. my dogs are done as young as possible. i know when it came to the bitch though he preferred her to have a season first.
 

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I was told by my breeder to neuter large slow maturing dogs at 18-24 months, however I had my epileptic dog (large breed) neutered at 9 months incase his fitting was hormone related and he's ok.
 

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I was told to castrate Mitch my GSD at 3years as he had an undesended testicle and this would give it time to drop and for him to mature without giving it chance to turn cancerous .Sadly he never made it to that age:sad:
 

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I have had a male castrated but I had my bitch spayed at 7 months, and we've never had a problem, and if I was to buy more bitches in the future they would go in at 7 months too.

Male wise I think 6 months is fine, I can't see what good waiting 24 months is going to do large dog or not? surely this only gives them 24 months to get bad habits like licking bitches bums or humping your leg which can then turn into habitual behaviours and not just a case of hormones :whistling2:
 

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Apparently not Niks i have been told that i castrated my X bitch way to early and was shouted at for doing it at 7 months before her first season.

Marina:)
 

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from the article in The Rottweiler Club Yearbook 2005

There are a number of adverse health problems associated with early spaying/neutering documented in veterinary research literature.

One will not find any mention of these adverse impacts in the pro-spay/neuter propoganda that commonly comes from breed rescue groups nor veterinary medical resources aimed at the layman.

Contrary to the common claim, the risk of prostrate cancer is not reduced with neutering, in fact the 2 most recent studies show a 4 fold increased risk of prostrate cancer in castrated dogs.

The risk of Osteosarcoma, a bone cancer doubles in spayed/neutered dogs. This risk in further increased if spay/neutering is done in the first year of life (Rotts were the only breed examined in this depth)

Spayed/neutererd dogs have a 3-4 fold risk of Hypothyroidism and a doubled risk of obesity, an increased risk of splenic and cardia hemangiosarcomas, diabetes, fatal acute pancreatitis, urinary incontinence, geriatic cognitive impairment and cranial cruciate ligament rupture. These are all documented in veterinary medical research literature.

Early spaying may unaturally increase height leading to further risk of bone damage.

Spaying/neutering before the growth plates have closed is a concern because it is the sex hormones close the growth plates. The bones of dogs spayed or neutered before puberty grow longer and more unevenly.

For example the femur may be the normal length at 6 - 8 months when the animal is spayed or neutered but tibia, which normally stops growing at 12-14 months of age, continues to grow, then an abnormal angle develops and also the lower leg below the stifle becomes heavier, because it is longer, causing increased stresses on the cranial cruciate ligament.

A study in 2004 showed that dogs spayed or neutered before the age of 5 had an increased risk of Hip Dysplasia.

Spaying bitches is accompanied by the risk of behavioural changes increasing indiscriminate appetite and an increase of dominance aggression towards family members.

Castrated dogs have stayed at the juvenile stage of developement for the rest of their lives.
 

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I am gonna wait till mine has started cocking his leg then will probably have him done then. Wherever you look on the WWW you will find conflicting advice so best thing to do is speak to your vet who will probably neuter hundreds of dogs a year so will be the best to give advice.
 

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Thanks for the link Marina it's interesting reading, I still think though if your dog is going to have hip displaysia(sp) then it's going to get it if you have it neutered or not, my neighbours god had hip 'whatdoyoucallit' at the age of 1 before they had had her spayed so if it's gonna happen it's gonna happen.

As for the height thing how they carry on growing, I wish someone would of told my bitch that she is tiddly height lol!!!

I would prefer to get them done early and not risk them gaining 'male' behaviours i.e. humping etc. than waiting till they were 3 or 4 and then it's habit and not hormone.
My vet did say though the older the dog the better the operation but I am not sure what reason that was, maybe it's easier to find a 3 year olds gonads than it is a 6 month old's lol
 

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www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf

On the positive side, neutering male dogs

eliminates the small risk (probably <1%) of dying from testicular cancer

reduces the risk of non-cancerous prostate disorders

reduces the risk of perianal fistulas

may possibly reduce the risk of diabetes (data inconclusive)
On the negative side, neutering male dogs

if done before 1 year of age, significantly increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer); this is a
common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis.

increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6

triples the risk of hypothyroidism

increases the risk of progressive geriatric cognitive impairment

triples the risk of obesity, a common health problem in dogs with many associated health problems

quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer

doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract cancers

increases the risk of orthopedic disorders

increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations
For female dogs, the situation is more complex. The number of health benefits associated with spaying may
exceed the associated health problems in some (not all) cases. On balance, whether spaying improves the
odds of overall good health or degrades them probably depends on the age of the female dog and the
relative risk of various diseases in the different breeds.
•increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations
One thing is clear – much of the spay/neuter information that is available to the public is unbalanced and
contains claims that are exaggerated or unsupported by evidence. Rather than helping to educate pet owners
The traditional spay/neuter age of six months as well as the modern practice of pediatric spay/neuter appear to predispose dogs to health risks that could otherwise be avoided by waiting until the dog is physically mature, or perhaps in the case of many male dogs, foregoing it altogether unless medically necessary.The balance of long-term health risks and benefits of spay/neuter will vary from one dog to the next. Breed,age, and gender are variables that must be taken into consideration in conjunction with non-medical factorsfor each individual dog. Across-the-board recommendations for all pet dogs do not appear to be supportable from findings in the veterinary medical literature.This section summarizes the diseases or conditions that have been studied with respect to spay/neuter in
dogs.
Prostate Cancer Much of the spay/neuter information available to the public asserts that neutering will reduce or eliminate the risk that male dogs develop prostate cancer. This would not be an unreasonable assumption, given that prostate cancer in humans is linked to testosterone. But the evidence in dogs does not support this claim.In fact, the strongest evidence suggests just the opposite. There have been several conflicting epidemiological studies over the years that found either an increasedrisk or a decreased risk of prostate cancer in neutered dogs. These studies did not utilize controlpopulations, rendering these results at best difficult to interpret. This may partially explain the conflicting results.More recently, two retrospective studies were conducted that did utilize control populations. One of thesestudies involved a dog population in Europeand the other involved a dog population in America. Both studies found that neutered male dogs have a four times higher risk of prostate cancer than intact dogs.Based on their results, the researchers suggest a cause-and-effect relationship: “this suggests that castration does not initiate the development of prostatic carcinoma in the dog, but does favor tumor progression”and also “Our study found that most canine prostate cancers are of ductal/urothelial origin….The relatively low incidence of prostate cancer in intact dogs may suggest that testicular hormones are in fact protective against ductal/urothelial prostatic carcinoma, or may have indirect effects on cancer development by changing the environment in the prostate.”This needs to be put in perspective. Unlike the situation in humans, prostate cancer is uncommon in dogs.Given an incidence of prostate cancer in dogs of less than 0.6% from necropsy studies it is difficult to see that the risk of prostate cancer should factor heavily into most neutering decisions. There is evidence for an increased risk of prostate cancer in at least one breed (Bouviers) though very little data so far to guide usin regards to other breeds.Testicular Cancer
Since the testicles are removed with neutering, castration removes any risk of testicular cancer (assuming the castration is done before cancer develops). This needs to be compared to the risk of testicular cancer in intact dogs.
Testicular tumors are not uncommon in older intact dogs, with a reported incidence of 7%
However, the prognosis for treating testicular tumors is very good owing to a low rate of metastasis so testicular cancer is an uncommon cause of death in intact dogs. For example, in a Purdue University breed health survey of Golden Retrievers deaths due to testicular cancer were sufficiently infrequent that they did not appear on list of significant causes of "Years of Potential Life Lost for Veterinary Confirmed Cause of Death” even though 40% of GR males were intact. Furthermore, the GRs who were treated for testicular tumors had a 90.9% cure rate. This agrees well with other work that found 6-14% rates of metastasis for testicular tumors in dogs The high cure rate of testicular tumors combined with their frequency suggests that fewer than 1% of intact male dogs will die of testicular cancer.In summary, though it may be the most common reason why many advocate neutering young male dogs, the risk from life threatening testicular cancer is sufficiently low that neutering most male dogs to prevent it is difficult to justify.
An exception might be bilateral or unilateral cryptorchids, as testicles that are retained in the abdomen are13.6 times more likely to develop tumors than descended testicles
and it is also more difficult to detect tumors in undescended testicles by routine physical examination.Osteosarcoma (Bone Cancer)
A multi-breed case-control study of the risk factors for osteosarcoma found that spay/neutered dogs (malesor females) had twice the risk of developing osteosarcoma as did intact dogs

.This risk was further studied in Rottweilers, a breed with a relatively high risk of osteosarcoma. This retrospective cohort study broke the risk down by age at spay/neuter, and found that the elevated risk of osteosarcoma is associated with spay/neuter of young dogs. Rottweilers spayed/neutered before one
year of age were 3.8 (males) or 3.1 (females) times more likely to develop osteosarcoma than intact dogs.Indeed, the combination of breed risk and early spay/neuter meant that Rottweilers spayed/neutered before
one year of age had a 28.4% (males) and 25.1% (females) risk of developing osteosarcoma. These results are consistent with the earlier multi-breed study
but have an advantage of assessing risk as a function of age at neuter. A logical conclusion derived from combining the findings of these two studies is that spay/neuter of dogs before 1 year of age is associated with a significantly increased risk of osteosarcoma.The researchers suggest a cause-and-effect relationship, as sex hormones are known to influence the maintenance of skeletal structure and mass, and also because their findings showed an inverse relationship
between time of exposure to sex hormones and risk of osteosarcoma.
The risk of osteosarcoma increases with increasing breed size and especially height
It is a common cause of death in medium/large, large, and giant breeds. Osteosarcoma is the third most common cause of death in Golden Retrievers and is even more common in larger breedsGiven the poor prognosis of osteosarcoma and its frequency in many breeds, spay/neuter of immature dogs in the medium/large, large, and giant breeds is apparently associated with a significant and elevated risk ofdeath due to osteosarcoma.Mammary Cancer (Breast Cancer)
Mammary tumors are by far the most common tumors in intact female dogs, constituting some 53% of all malignant tumors in female dogs in a study of dogs in Norway
where spaying is much less common than in the USA. 50-60% of mammary tumors are malignant, for which there is a significant risk of metastasis
Mammary tumors in dogs have been found to have estrogen receptors and the published research shows that the relative risk (odds ratio) that a female will develop mammary cancer compared to the risk in intact females is
dependent on how many estrus cycles she experiences:# of estrus cycles before spay.
Mammary cancer was found to be the 10th most common cause of years of lost life in Golden Retrievers,even though 86% of female GRs were spayed, at a median age of 3.4 yrs.Considering that the female subset accounts for almost all mammary cancer cases, it probably would rank at about the 5th most common cause of years of lost life in female GRs. It would rank higher still if more female GRs had been kept intact up to 30 months of age.Boxers, cocker spaniels, English Springer spaniels, and dachshunds are breeds at high risk of mammary tumors.A population of mostly intact female Boxers was found to have a 40% chance of developing mammary cancer between the ages of 6-12 years of age There are some indications that purebred dogs may be at higher risk than mixed breed dogs, and purebred dogs may be at higher risk than those with low inbreeding coefficients In summary, spaying female dogs significantly reduces the risk of mammary cancer (a common cancer),and the fewer estrus cycles experienced at least up to 30 months of age, the lower the risk will be.
 
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