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Might sound stupid but

Are these royals where the eggs have been collected in the wild and then hatched in Captivity or is it the Royals (parents) have been WC then bred in captivity? - Just Wondering

Cheers

Chris
 

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Either the eggs are collected or the gravid females are collected typically speaking. A baby from a WC set of parents that you have bred yourself can still be CB - because it's been bred in captivity.
 

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Generally speaking, CF means either the Dam was taken from the wild already gravid and the eggs were hatched in captivity, or the eggs were already laid, and they were collected from the wild, then hatched in captivity.
 

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I think collecting the eggs is quite rare - they are less likely to survive transport to a farm when outside the female compared to inside. The vast majority of 'farmed' or 'Ranched' royals are, as said above, from gravid females caught in the wild then released after they have laid their eggs.

Note also that towards the end of the season (May, June etc), the ranched juveniles are oftern supplemented with wild-caught ones.

Not many farming operations in W Africa go in for cb these days - there are many more overheads to maintaining adults in captivity compared with just catching gravid females from the wild.
 

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There have been some very poor practices in the past regarding how the adult females were treated, but I think that at least in part, in some countries this has been addressed. Most famous is Ghana which I think has one of the highest outputs where they are now paid (a very small amount to us but worth it to them) to re-release both adults and a small % of the offspring I believe?.

There have been a lot of horror stories about farmed royals in the past, it's hard to know exactly which practices are true and which aren't. At the end of the day, any business worth anything (and these businesses are worth a lot to the owners!) knows that killig it's product means it's going to run out - re-release the adult and you can catch her again next year, you haven't had to feed her, look after her, find her a male, yet next year you'll end up with her eggs again. There is little point now in killing the adult females. Such big business, I think the majority of farms release that they need to conserve their resources..... if they didn't keep the females in good health and re-release, they would eventually deplete the stock of adult females to grab.
 
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