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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so I got my three colubrids in a room upstairs in my house. It's summer here. There's no air conditioner up there. So the temps in the room are gonna usually hover around 29-30 C during the day but won't drop lower than 24-25C at night. Obviously I don't have to worry about giving them any extra heat. And if it did get any cooler at night no problem I'll give them extra heat. My biggest concern is they aren't going to have a daytime temperature gradient in their vivs. Is that a concern? And is 25C maybe sometimes 26C at night enough of a night time temperature drop? And if they were feeling too warm or uncomfortable what kind of signs would they give me?
 

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It all depends on the species of colubrid, we have the same here and I had to move on some colubrid species as they just couldn't cope with it (mainly SE asian species like Rhino ratsnakes and mandarins). Many species are fine with it as long as they always have water available and that it does drop by a few degrees at night.
Uncomfortable signs, roaming around loads, constant bathing, but the main worry is if they start regurging food
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It all depends on the species of colubrid, we have the same here and I had to move on some colubrid species as they just couldn't cope with it (mainly SE asian species like Rhino ratsnakes and mandarins). Many species are fine with it as long as they always have water available and that it does drop by a few degrees at night.
Uncomfortable signs, roaming around loads, constant bathing, but the main worry is if they start regurging food
And do you think it's ok that there's no temperature gradient in their tanks at the moment? I live in North America so actually the weather here is the same as what these breeds would be used to in the wild. But I'm still worrying :confused:
 

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There is not a lot you can do if the ambient air temperature in the house and outside is the same or above what would be ideal as a cool spot. In the wild there is always a location that will be cooler, such as under a log, or in damp earth, or even in water. If you are concerned, then adding a large shallow container of cold water at the cool end in the viv will do one of two things. It will provide a cold area where the snake can coil round or lay against, or it can lay in the water if the container is large enough. Changing the water at regular intervals to maintain it's coolness in the heat of the afternoon can help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There is not a lot you can do if the ambient air temperature in the house and outside is the same or above what would be ideal as a cool spot. In the wild there is always a location that will be cooler, such as under a log, or in damp earth, or even in water. If you are concerned, then adding a large shallow container of cold water at the cool end in the viv will do one of two things. It will provide a cold area where the snake can coil round or lay against, or it can lay in the water if the container is large enough. Changing the water at regular intervals to maintain it's coolness in the heat of the afternoon can help.
That sounds like a great idea thank you
 

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controlling summer options was one of the reasons for switching to soil as a substrate for me. not the only one, but soil is a fantastic insulator. if you can get a good layer in there and make a mound with a buried hide in it will help. even in the limited space of a viv it can offer a decent refuge and the temps will stay more consistent. the deeper the soil the better the effect.
i built new vivs over winter as i had more problems over summer and too much heat than not enough. so i put loads of ventilation in but, as malc said, there is nothing you can do about ambient temps.
 

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And do you think it's ok that there's no temperature gradient in their tanks at the moment? I live in North America so actually the weather here is the same as what these breeds would be used to in the wild. But I'm still worrying :confused:
As long as it drops at night then should be fine. Some of the less tolerant species I put in a tub of soil for them to borrow in which I keep damp, this helps keep them cooler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
controlling summer options was one of the reasons for switching to soil as a substrate for me. not the only one, but soil is a fantastic insulator. if you can get a good layer in there and make a mound with a buried hide in it will help. even in the limited space of a viv it can offer a decent refuge and the temps will stay more consistent. the deeper the soil the better the effect.
i built new vivs over winter as i had more problems over summer and too much heat than not enough. so i put loads of ventilation in but, as malc said, there is nothing you can do about ambient temps.
What kind of soil would you recommend? And how deep of a layer of soil should I put under the substrate? I use heat treated aspen as substrate. And my other question right now is since I can't control the ambient temps, sometimes it is warm in there but not as warm as is recommended for a hot spot, but if I add a heat source for a hot spot it just heats everything up way too quickly. Maybe just add a hot spot for a tiny bit after I feed them if needed? All thoughts are so helpful!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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What kind of soil would you recommend? And how deep of a layer of soil should I put under the substrate? I use heat treated aspen as substrate. And my other question right now is since I can't control the ambient temps, sometimes it is warm in there but not as warm as is recommended for a hot spot, but if I add a heat source for a hot spot it just heats everything up way too quickly. Maybe just add a hot spot for a tiny bit after I feed them if needed? All thoughts are so helpful!
 

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I am wondering if anyone can recommend a small portable air con unit that could be positioned next to a viv to cool temps down a bit if needed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As long as it drops at night then should be fine. Some of the less tolerant species I put in a tub of soil for them to borrow in which I keep damp, this helps keep them cooler.
I like that idea. My one corn loves to dig in his plants and always gets soil up his nose which concerns me but, what kind of soil would you recommend?
 

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i use organic topsoil, no fertilisers or things like that. i also dont put it under aspen, it works fine as a substrate in itself. there is plenty of stuff around on using soil as a substrate, pros and cons. personally i like it though, its not a planted viv or anything so no worries about plant food and bioactive stuff. i dont think i could recommend one brand or another as i am not familiar with whats available for you.
as for the depth, as much as you can manage sensibly. the more there is the better the insulating effect. if you have a smaller viv then you can pile up on one end or in a corner.

I am wondering if anyone can recommend a small portable air con unit that could be positioned next to a viv to cool temps down a bit if needed?
i thought about that myself, but unless you are cooling the whole room i think it would be largely ineffective. you could rig up an air-con system for the viv but that would be pretty complicated and expensive to run i would think. possibly worth it for the more tricky tropical species but for corns and a yellow rat it sounds a bit over the top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes I think I'm going to try the soil maybe just in a corner of each tank they will like that thank you. Worst case scenario I put them in a temporary setup and bring them to the main floor for a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
i use organic topsoil, no fertilisers or things like that. i also dont put it under aspen, it works fine as a substrate in itself. there is plenty of stuff around on using soil as a substrate, pros and cons. personally i like it though, its not a planted viv or anything so no worries about plant food and bioactive stuff. i dont think i could recommend one brand or another as i am not familiar with whats available for you.
as for the depth, as much as you can manage sensibly. the more there is the better the insulating effect. if you have a smaller viv then you can pile up on one end or in a corner.



i thought about that myself, but unless you are cooling the whole room i think it would be largely ineffective. you could rig up an air-con system for the viv but that would be pretty complicated and expensive to run i would think. possibly worth it for the more tricky tropical species but for corns and a yellow rat it sounds a bit over the top.
Just curious what tropical species would need an air conditioner? I thought they liked being warm?
 

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with tropical species its not so much about being cool as it is about being consistent. there are plenty of species that suffer very badly if the temps get above a certain level. the climate they live in is a lot more consistent than temperate areas, but it can still be surprisingly cool in montane regions. so if you live in a place with huge temperature swings then some species would be difficult to keep. you could invest in a reptile room with air-con and heating to maintain those temps when the outside temps go from really hot in summer to freezing in winter. if you only ever wanted one enclosure then you could invest in a controlled set up which does the same job.

hence a lot of the common beginner species in the hobby are temperate species that are well adapted to cope with a wide range of temps through the year, its an easier enclosure to dial in and keep the animal healthy in many climates.
 

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Cribos come from Central and South America but thrive at lower temperatures 70-75f and will get very stressed at over 80f.
 

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My snake tolerate/tolerated it.I've kept corns,kings,milks,rats in UK.But the hottest periods didn't last long and i live in a draughty home.I always put a big size bowl/dish of cold water in the vivs.One of the signs is constant pacing with nose rubbing.
 
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