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Does anyone know how to care for a common frog?
 

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Just a note, they dont make great captives due to there flightly nature and long jump meaning they often jump into the sides of tanks especially glass tanks causing injury.

I dont know of any caresheets but a big tank, lots of cover and just a decent sized water bowl will do one outside of breeding season as they are infact pretty terrestrial but a semi aquatic set-up can be used
 

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ok thanks m8. do they need a heat mat or anything for them? also what would be best to feed them on? iwas thinkin either wingless fruit flies or micro crix or blood worms?
 

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If they live in our dismal climate they won't need a heat mat:lol2: But I think a UV bulb might be beneficial, since the frogs in my pond like to bask during the day.

Those foods you mentioned are all far too small for an adult. If you are keeping a froglet then yes they are ideal, but adults should eat:

Crickets and/or locusts, waxworms and waxmoths, earthworms, slugs. Make sure if you are collecting wild foods they are from a pesticide free area.
 

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I'm not wanting to sound an ass but every time someone tries to keep a common frog it dies..

I really recomend build a pond and enjoy them that way, or have a tank of spawn, watch it all develop and then release them.
 

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Build a decent wildlife pond, best and only way to "keep" them well. Sadly there numbers are fast declining in the uk, we should not be taking yet more out of the wild.
 

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i accidentally hit on with a grass strimmer yesterday, and im looking after it outside in a rub filled halfway with water and with bits of bark to rest on
 

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i would say if you really want one, wait until spring and keep some tadpols and them when they turn into froglets you can keep one or 2 and let the rest go.

i tried to keep one once and they are so skitish that they will jump about and hurt themselves everytame you do anything in the tank.

i would think how ever if you raised one from a baby it would be a lot calmer
 

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As has been said, they need a reatively large tank, some cover and plenty of food. the adults don't need too much water, but the temps must be relatively cool. Personally, I wouldn't bother, and they are pretty much terrestrial at this time of the year anyway.
 

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As has been said, they need a reatively large tank, some cover and plenty of food. the adults don't need too much water, but the temps must be relatively cool. Personally, I wouldn't bother, and they are pretty much terrestrial at this time of the year anyway.
Yes- ordinary viv temps are usually too high for them. I don't want to be a downer, but they really do best outside- whether in an enclosed area or just loose around a pond.
 

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hiya
they do best outdoors, u can keep them in outdoor enclosures or if u have a pond they will live happily best in there.
there numbers are decreasing and it is better to build a pond 4 them
 

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Eventhough this thread is two years old....so the OP's question is personally redundant, For those who find this by searching and want to know about keeping common frogs....

Have a look at my Virtual Tank Tour video

Common Frog - Rana Temporaria - Virtual Tank Tour - YouTube

I must be doing something right as they bred this year :2thumb:


But yeah, when young they make terrible captives. Eventhough mine were bred into captivity (Collected eggs) they were very flighty and kept crashing into the sides of the tank. Although I must say they're quite docile now as adults.

I agree with pretty much everything said..

very big tank (My adult trio is in a 48x15x18 )

plenty of cover (Bark pieces, plants etc)

large waterbowl for adults (one of mine hibernated in the water last winter, but hibernation is a whole nother ballgame)
small shallow dish for young frogs (They can drown easily and get tired trying to climb out - I lost a few to drowning in the early days)

Feeding Young - Fruit flies, Pinhead/small crickets, woodlice, small slugs, Bean Weevils etc (Personally I dust every feed when young, with Repashy Calcium Plus)
Feeding Adults - As you would with any amphib really, crickets, locusts, slugs, worms, woodlice, mealworms, roaches (Personally I dust every 2-3 feeds)

Lighting - Well, it's not very often I see any of my adult trio during the day, but they still have UV (Repti-Glo 10%) Now, many people won't agree with the fact I use a 10%, but from what I've been told about bulb outputs vs natural levels etc, added to the fact their tank is 18" tall, I err on the side of caution.(All my phibs have 10% bulbs, but they've got plenty cover so they can get out of the light)


But I strongly agree with building a pond if you can. It'll bring in alot more than just frogs and the best part is, you don't even need to feed em :2thumb:
 

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Well I'm not 100% sure about yeast (that's why I ask) but It is mentioned in an article about growth rates of P.ridibundus as main tadpole food until they are 15 days old...

Did I understand right that fishflakes is essential for tadpoles or it can be replaced with, Fex, daphnias? Do the Rana tadpoles need protein rich food (fishflakes) only on the last stages of development like Pelobates? Or they need protein food for all the time until they become froglets?

Thanks.


Update: oh, it seems I accidently posted in the wrong topic, and sadly I cant find a button to remove my message :blush:
 

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I raised the one I got from a tadpol an she has done well for 5 years.
She still doesn't like being touched but will take food from my hand, big nylon mesh enclosure's work well like exo Terra flexariums, as they will hurt there selfs on glass. They like to sit in shallow water a lot, but a deep end to swim aswell. Mine eats more than all my other reptiles combined, meal worms, morio worms, wood lice, wax worms, earth worms, crickets and locusts are what I feed her.
I do however think they are best left outside tho, coz do need a lot of space. I have often considered releasing her but I'm not sure she would manage in the wild now, plus I've seen what ducks do to them at my mums farm, she seems happy enough tho.
 

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Great advise... May get some spawn next year to watch the development with the kids.. :)

Tiger

Sent from my LT18i using Tapatalk 2
 

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how i care for mine

I know this is years old. This is if anyone searches for info and comes across this. Now I’m new to reptiles but have been keeping amphibs for twelve years including common frogs one of mine is nearly nine. This info is based on my experience completely. If you have the time then get tadpoles and rear them into froglets, then keep between three to five and let the rest go so you are doing your part while benefiting to. I feed them on fruit flies, spring tails and small crickets. I feed them twice a day and once in the night (10pm-12am). gave them a 2% UV light and openly planted terrarium which was sprayed once in the morning and in the night (just before feeding) if you can't be bother do this for a good 2 years then get some from your or somewhere you know where there is a large population of frogs and its legal. If you do this then get them between July-august as they aren’t breeding and are not trying to hibernate/get ready to. Before you get your frog though you need a set up. I generally think a 60cm, 30cm, 45cm is enough room for at least five adults. You can just use coco nut fibre. i how every use coco nut fibre, play sand, dry shredded grass, dry sphagnum moss, dried grass roots and oak/beach leaves with the odd pebble somewhere. It is important from them to have a substrate that they can dig in as they will make dips or even tunnels in the case of the males. i then place the logs/rock's in. i found they like to be able to get up high and also young ones like to climb branches. Then plant the cage with live plants. I then water log the soil a month be for i get the frogs and place a 5% uv bulb to get the plants to grow. The temp needs to be between 18C-25C for them to be most active. Once you get the frogs before i put them in i water log the soil again. The reason i do this is because when in a new environment they feel most safe near water. The deepest part of water should not exceed 5cm. this means the frog can explore its home knowing if it feels scared it can fly in to the water. Until the water evaporates i only put the food in and that’s the only contact I have with the frogs. After the water is gone I then spend time around the cage at least 3 times for 5mins each a day. After about the week i find the frogs don't panic whenever they see me. i then spend time opening and closing the cage until the wont go for their bolt holes. i then will feed them and leave the cage open and watch them eat. And then if you want you can leave it at that or continue till they will take food from your hand or even be happily handled (use damp gloves or you can damage their skin) i got one female that will sit on the bed while i do work or just chilling. And one group i keep the lid off when I’m in the room. However if anyone get snakes or partially birds out near them then lock the frogs up as they will panic and if they get out in a panic they will damage them self’s in a blind panic. They will bask if given a UV light. My groups head up as high as they can and bask for a good hour so in my opinion they need it. i give them calcium dust twice a week and feed them five times a week. They get black/brown crickets, locust, meal worms, super worms (only for the adults), earth worms, house flies, wax worms and dubias. Once a month the adults get a pinki each as a treat. There will be people that disagree with me and that’s fine. This is what I found the most successful. In the nine years I have kept common frogs. I only have had two deaths. One got really bad worms and another just fell over and died with no obvious cause though that was about three years ago. Still got my first ever one. Once tamed down and given the right conditions they are in my opinion the best frog. Active in the day, social, have lots of different personalities, various colour forms (black, yellow, green, greyish, chocolate brown, Patten less, spotty, stripy, blotchy and I even have one with reddish pigment), easy to keep and can be really tame. Hope this helps anyone that comes across this.
 

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If someone wanted to collect spawn from the wild, raise the tads, release most of the metamorphs back to the pond, and keep a few back to grow on as 'pets', then I would recommend common toads rather than common frogs. This avoids the problem of their jumping and bashing themselves against the sides. Plus they tolerate a drier habitat which avoids problems of a humid viv. They are great characters and tame readily.
 

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I know this is years old. This is if anyone searches for info and comes across this. Now I’m new to reptiles but have been keeping amphibs for twelve years including common frogs one of mine is nearly nine. This info is based on my experience completely. If you have the time then get tadpoles and rear them into froglets, then keep between three to five and let the rest go so you are doing your part while benefiting to. I feed them on fruit flies, spring tails and small crickets. I feed them twice a day and once in the night (10pm-12am). gave them a 2% UV light and openly planted terrarium which was sprayed once in the morning and in the night (just before feeding) if you can't be bother do this for a good 2 years then get some from your or somewhere you know where there is a large population of frogs and its legal. If you do this then get them between July-august as they aren’t breeding and are not trying to hibernate/get ready to. Before you get your frog though you need a set up. I generally think a 60cm, 30cm, 45cm is enough room for at least five adults. You can just use coco nut fibre. i how every use coco nut fibre, play sand, dry shredded grass, dry sphagnum moss, dried grass roots and oak/beach leaves with the odd pebble somewhere. It is important from them to have a substrate that they can dig in as they will make dips or even tunnels in the case of the males. i then place the logs/rock's in. i found they like to be able to get up high and also young ones like to climb branches. Then plant the cage with live plants. I then water log the soil a month be for i get the frogs and place a 5% uv bulb to get the plants to grow. The temp needs to be between 18C-25C for them to be most active. Once you get the frogs before i put them in i water log the soil again. The reason i do this is because when in a new environment they feel most safe near water. The deepest part of water should not exceed 5cm. this means the frog can explore its home knowing if it feels scared it can fly in to the water. Until the water evaporates i only put the food in and that’s the only contact I have with the frogs. After the water is gone I then spend time around the cage at least 3 times for 5mins each a day. After about the week i find the frogs don't panic whenever they see me. i then spend time opening and closing the cage until the wont go for their bolt holes. i then will feed them and leave the cage open and watch them eat. And then if you want you can leave it at that or continue till they will take food from your hand or even be happily handled (use damp gloves or you can damage their skin) i got one female that will sit on the bed while i do work or just chilling. And one group i keep the lid off when I’m in the room. However if anyone get snakes or partially birds out near them then lock the frogs up as they will panic and if they get out in a panic they will damage them self’s in a blind panic. They will bask if given a UV light. My groups head up as high as they can and bask for a good hour so in my opinion they need it. i give them calcium dust twice a week and feed them five times a week. They get black/brown crickets, locust, meal worms, super worms (only for the adults), earth worms, house flies, wax worms and dubias. Once a month the adults get a pinki each as a treat. There will be people that disagree with me and that’s fine. This is what I found the most successful. In the nine years I have kept common frogs. I only have had two deaths. One got really bad worms and another just fell over and died with no obvious cause though that was about three years ago. Still got my first ever one. Once tamed down and given the right conditions they are in my opinion the best frog. Active in the day, social, have lots of different personalities, various colour forms (black, yellow, green, greyish, chocolate brown, Patten less, spotty, stripy, blotchy and I even have one with reddish pigment), easy to keep and can be really tame. Hope this helps anyone that comes across this.
It's always interesting to hear about someone's 'hands-on' experience. :2thumb: How do you deal with the temperature issue?
 
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