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There is also a breeding population of Aesculapian snakes along Regents canal. They escaped from an exhibition at london zoo. If anyone is interested a quick google search will yield the full facts.
 

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Craig,
Not at the moment thanks. We already have plenty of evidence that terrapins are in the wild and breeding (we’ve several thriving populations near us). I’m only really looking for snake records for now.
I haven't heard of evidence of breeding. As far as I am aware eggs have been laid in Hampshire but never hatched. There are records of breeding in Germany in the wild but the have much warmer summers than we do, I'm interested to hear more about breeding in the UK.

"Trachemys scripta elegans​
is currently unable to reproduce in the wild anywhere in the UK under prevailing climatic conditions."


http://www.nonnativespecies.org/documents/RA_Trachemys_scripta_elegans_(Red-eared_Terrapin)11-09.pdf
 

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As to Terrapins breeding I dont think that there have been any recorded cases of eggs hatching. The animals themselves thrive in the summer and brumate in the mud at the bottom of ponds and lakes, copulate and lay but the eggs dont come to term due to the climate
 

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yea they are Aesculapian Snakes (sorry if spelling is wrong) its just dont the road from me, been there loads never seen any though, i even did 4weeks work experience there and never saw one lol, apparently from what ive read one gravid female escaped from the zoo and now there is a small colony there,

so would not be surprised if wild corns where in britain, especially in the warmer parts,

i mean if rat snakes can survive on the zoo which btw is so bludy windy and when it rains it really rains and is cold alot of the time due to the wind. im sure they could survive most places
Don't know if i am being thick but i heard there are small populations of the Aesculapian rat snake all over euope left behind by the romans who took them everywhere with them
 

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One other thing, most of our native reptiles are considered viviparous by most (possibly Ovoviviparous in some cases but not much info), which means they do not lay eggs for external incubation. This to me begs the question, what is the advantage of internal incubation? And is it related to the British climate?

Grass snakes and Sand lizards I think are the only oviparous reptiles here and although they seem to have adapted behaviour to hatching their clutches I doubt non native reptiles would be able, and if they ever were to adapt it would take time (if anything) for them to do so. On Sand lizards; are they not seriously in decline? Could this be related to lack of nest sites, Grass snakes use decomposing vegetation piles do Sand lizards depend on a similer resource?

All speculation of course but worth mentioning I hope.


The Advantage of carrying the young inside is that the animal can seek out warm places and bask to help the development off embryos. Grass snakes lay eggs in rotting vegetation as the decomposition of vegetable matter creates heat. Sand lizards lay their eggs in shallow holes in sand on south facing banks, relying on the sun to incubate. This is probably why they are only prevelent on the south coast as it is slightly warmer although there is a population in north Wales. The decline in Grass snake numbers has been attributed to changes in farming practices and river bank management eg not enough manure heaps and rotting vegetation available as suitable nesting sites. The decline in Sand lizards is not climate related but purely a lack of habitat.
 

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Don't know if i am being thick but i heard there are small populations of the Aesculapian rat snake all over euope left behind by the romans who took them everywhere with them
The 2 breeding populations in the UK are the result of zoo escapes, the welsh one attributed to a single gravid female. Also at this site the snakes make use of the zoo's out buildings in winter to stave of the worst of the cold weather. The animals are also reported to be undersized.
 

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The 2 breeding populations in the UK are the result of zoo escapes, the welsh one attributed to a single gravid female. Also at this site the snakes make use of the zoo's out buildings in winter to stave of the worst of the cold weather. The animals are also reported to be undersized.
I can say there is def a grey rat snake population in Thetford forest,and a small population of green tree frogs that has been there since i was a kid and that was more than a couple of years ago.Thanks for the info above i stand corrected:2thumb:
 
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