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Hi everyone. Soon I will be purchasing a Crawl Cay Boa yearling. Can it go straight into my 3x2x2 viv or a rub for example... A 64 litre. If I went for the rub option until it got a bit bigger. Can someone list everything I will need in it. It can be a very basic setup until it gets bigger for money wise. It would be greatly appreciated thank you!
 

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It would be fine putting it into a 3' x 2' x 2' viv. Just provide places for it to hide in, but unlike royals for example, boa's are not as shy.

You'll get varied suggestions on how to set things up as we all do things differently, based on individual preferences, from using a rub in a rack with newspaper for a substrate, through to naturally planted set ups. You will need a heat source, and most people will suggest the use of a ceramic heater, run off a pulse proportional thermostat. Maintain a hot spot of around 30-32c. Make sure the heater is well guarded too.

If you are opting for a traditional viv, try and include some branches as boa's do climb. Substrate can be fine wood chips, shavings (aspen, or better still a product called snowflake bedding), newspaper, etc. I would steer clear of bark chippings unless you give them a good wash and bake them to make sure there is nothing hidden in the nooks and crannies.
 

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I'm old school - I like to keep snakes as display animals and not shoved away in a rub in a rack. I would not use a heat mat for a boa or python as they are heavy bodied snakes and can cause what is known as thermal blocking. basically they draw the heat out of the mat, so the thermostat drives the heater harder, and thus eventually can lead to burning the snake or in rare occasions, burning the heatmat. IMO, and it is my opinion, stick to a viv, use a ceramic heater with a pusle stat as suggested, and spend some time fitting branches and some silk / plastic vines in the tank. Illuminate it using a low wattage under cupboard flourecent light, and enjoy watching your purchase explore his new home.
 

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How can you prefer a dimmer stat and "bulb" to a ceramic heating element and pulse stat?
A bulb is for illumination, not to heat an enclosure (maybe in the 80's).
Guarded ceramic heater with reflector and pulse stat all the way, this is the only real option for the health and well being of the animal concerned.
Other than that maybe a reptile radiator panel with either built in or same pulse stat.
Thanks.
 

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I have always preferred reptile radiator on a pulse stat - make the basking sport about 12 inches from the rad - but still use a tall bulb. when these snakes were originally collected from the wild they were mostly found of the ground in shirts and bushes - they like to climb even more than commons. a planted viv with a bioactive substrate would be great for one these little boas
 

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How can you prefer a dimmer stat and "bulb" to a ceramic heating element and pulse stat?
A bulb is for illumination, not to heat an enclosure (maybe in the 80's).
Guarded ceramic heater with reflector and pulse stat all the way, this is the only real option for the health and well being of the animal concerned.
Other than that maybe a reptile radiator panel with either built in or same pulse stat.
Thanks.
not true about bulbs being unsuitable for heating- many keepers including myself use them for heating, & some prefer them to ceramics, because bulbs don't dry out the air in the viv as much as ceramics do.
 

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not true about bulbs being unsuitable for heating- many keepers including myself use them for heating, & some prefer them to ceramics, because bulbs don't dry out the air in the viv as much as ceramics do.
Bulbs, whilst generating heat are not as efficient as ceramics. Setting aside specialist IR lamps, normal lamps designed for illumination will not give out a lot o IR, and their surface temperatures run a lot cooler than a ceramic making them less effective at heating the air. They are by design produced to give out as much light as possible with as little heat generated as it's the heat that shortens the life of the bulbs.

Using bulbs on a dimmer also means you can't maintain a photoperiod as the light will always be on, and in reverse of a normal day night cycle (ie being cooler at nigh the light will be brighter to maintain the set point). There has been some debate over using red light bulbs, but as most red light bulbs are just a coating applied to the glass to "generate" rather than filter the red light wave form, other wavelengths will still be flooding the enclosure. I for one still believe that reptiles use a photoperiod, and seasonal variations of that photo period as a trigger for normal behaviour (breeding cycles, feeding cycles etc).

I've never found using a ceramic an issue with humidity, but then I've never kept a species that required 70-80% humidity. But then placing a glass bulb in a very humid environment has it's risks too, especially as a normal ES or Bayonet fitting is not protected against high levels of moisture.

To be honest the debate of using bulbs vs ceramics will go on and on. It's what you feel comfortable with, and what conditions you beleive will benefit the animal you are keeping. The main reason people use bulbs back in the early days was because there was nothing else that was suitable. These days there are a selection of ceramic based heaters, but their costs, predudice and people still set in their ways from those early days, will meant that they won't change.

Bottom line is running a 100w spot on a dimmer, or a 60w / 150w ceramic on a pulse stat. Both will warm the vivarium, both will give a local hot spot. The spot will cost more to run than the ceramic, the spot will be cheaper to purchase than the ceramic. The ceramic will (typically) last a lot longer than the spot.
 

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I have always preferred reptile radiator on a pulse stat - make the basking sport about 12 inches from the rad - but still use a tall bulb. when these snakes were originally collected from the wild they were mostly found of the ground in shirts and bushes - they like to climb even more than commons. a planted viv with a bioactive substrate would be great for one these little boas
jeez just re read this and it makes no sense :2thumb:

tall viv

off the ground in shrubs and bushes :no1:
 

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Bulbs, whilst generating heat are not as efficient as ceramics. Setting aside specialist IR lamps, normal lamps designed for illumination will not give out a lot o IR, and their surface temperatures run a lot cooler than a ceramic making them less effective at heating the air. They are by design produced to give out as much light as possible with as little heat generated as it's the heat that shortens the life of the bulbs.

Using bulbs on a dimmer also means you can't maintain a photoperiod as the light will always be on, and in reverse of a normal day night cycle (ie being cooler at nigh the light will be brighter to maintain the set point). There has been some debate over using red light bulbs, but as most red light bulbs are just a coating applied to the glass to "generate" rather than filter the red light wave form, other wavelengths will still be flooding the enclosure. I for one still believe that reptiles use a photoperiod, and seasonal variations of that photo period as a trigger for normal behaviour (breeding cycles, feeding cycles etc).

I've never found using a ceramic an issue with humidity, but then I've never kept a species that required 70-80% humidity. But then placing a glass bulb in a very humid environment has it's risks too, especially as a normal ES or Bayonet fitting is not protected against high levels of moisture.

To be honest the debate of using bulbs vs ceramics will go on and on. It's what you feel comfortable with, and what conditions you beleive will benefit the animal you are keeping. The main reason people use bulbs back in the early days was because there was nothing else that was suitable. These days there are a selection of ceramic based heaters, but their costs, predudice and people still set in their ways from those early days, will meant that they won't change.

Bottom line is running a 100w spot on a dimmer, or a 60w / 150w ceramic on a pulse stat. Both will warm the vivarium, both will give a local hot spot. The spot will cost more to run than the ceramic, the spot will be cheaper to purchase than the ceramic. The ceramic will (typically) last a lot longer than the spot.
my bulbs are all on timers timed to switch off at night, as are the few ceramics i use, with background heat from mats for those that need it. for those that don't, room temp until the bulbs/ceramics come back on the next morning.
 

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my bulbs are all on timers timed to switch off at night, as are the few ceramics i use, with background heat from mats for those that need it. for those that don't, room temp until the bulbs/ceramics come back on the next morning.
Whatever works for you.

Personally I would not retrict access to a warm hot spot in such a way, unless the background temperatures (ie room temp) remains at a decent level. In the summer the room where I keep my snakes can still be 23-25c at 1am, but in winter it's down to 18-19c at the same time, and whilst I would be fine turning the heating off at night in summer, I wouldn't so so in the winter, especially when keeping boa's or pythons. But this was the point I was trying to make. We all do things differently, based on the research we did at the time.... providing your animals are healthy, feeding and doing all the othre things they should then who am I to question your techniques or practices.
 
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