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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to start keeping Dendrobates again but would like a little advice on keeping these little fellers as my last shot at keeping them wasn't very successful i was told that additional heating wasn't necessary as the uv bulb would produce sufficient heat but i am sure that this is the main reason why my pair of auratus failed to stay fit an healthy so any info on heating these frogs would be a big help also any recommended breeders would b useful too
Ta
 

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Most species will thrive at around 25degC so this is what you should be aiming around. The UV should keep the viv at the right temperature provided the ambient temp of the room is warm. If not then a heatmat controlled by a stat can be used or extra lighting above the viv, paying close attention to the effect that any additional heating has on humidity.

Can I ask what viv you had them in and what decor/plants/food etc you were using as it is possible that something else had an impact on why your frogs didn't survive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cheers Stuart i check them out
Matt
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i bleve the plants wher bromelia species but carnt be 100% as they wer off the net as a dart frog plant pack feeding was fruit fly and micro crickets dusted with calcium powder please feel free to advise me more on keeping these frogs
Matt
 

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Fruit flies are the staple food used for darts and while people do use micro crickets, many prefer not to unless in an emergency, mainly because they hide away and grow too big for the frogs and could potentially harm them as well as eating your plants. Tropical springtails are another good food source and cultured quite easily on peat plate, charcoal or orchid bark. Ghastly152 off here keeps a very good selection of cultures for darts that he will sometimes sell some of.

Auratus are one of the more terrestrial species, although they will use the whole viv, and should be given plenty of ground covering plants to make them feel secure. Also check that any substrate you use does not contain any harmful chemicals that the frogs can absorb through their skin.

Personally I use a layer of leca (clay balls) covered with peat compost for planting and top that with a good layer of orchid bark chips. Has always worked well for me and gives microfauna plenty of hiding places so they can multiply in the viv providing a supplemental food source.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Chris as a beginner in keeping dart frogs would u recommend setting up the viv myself or are their suppliers that design the vivs for these frogs
Matt
 

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The fun is in doing it yourself to be honest. The link I sent you will enable you to see a number of set ups that people have done and give you some ideas.

There are a whole range of backgrounds and decor that you can use from brought to homemade and planting it out is a matter of personal taste.

Plants such as pothos and ficus pumilia from garden centres can be used as a fairly cheap way to provide ground cover and provided a suitable background is used, they will grow up the back and sides of the viv. These should all have the compost and foliage rinsed off thoroughly before they are put in the viv in case pesticides and other chemicals have been used in their growing.

Nice bits of wood can be found from wanders in woodland but try and avoid any from near to fields that will have chemicals sprayed on them or close to main roads where pollutants may be present.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
1 last Q Chris buying the frogs themselves is it best to buy froglets or sub adults an what species would you recommend i fancy dendrobate leucomelas is that suitable for beginners thanks again for your help an will keep you inform on my progress with the frogs
Matt
 

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Usually recommended species for beginners are most of the tinctorius morphs, auratus morphs and leucomelas. Tincs get large and very bold, leucomelas and auratus are both what I'd class as medium sized and leucomelas tend to be the bolder of the two species.

Froglets can be tricky to keep so I'd start out with grown on juveniles if possible as, while adults are good, unless the person you get them off has had them from young, it is hard to tell how old they are and they could be on their last legs when you get them.
 
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