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Discussion Starter #1
My hatchling tub is on a shelf unit (open), which cannot receive direct sunlight, but gets daylight nonetheless as all open rooms in homes do.

The lights go off when everyone goes to bed. All good so far.

However, the problem arises on my nights off. When everyone goes to bed, I'm getting up, and usually am in this room, here on the PC, and use a small lamp so I don't sit in the dark. The small yellow lamp doesn't shine directly into the tub, but does manage to illuminate the tub a dull shade.

Will this be harmful or detrimental to her establishing a cycle? If so, should I just place a towel over the tub on my nights off?
 

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i dont bother. My snakes usually sleep on and off through the day and night anyway.
 

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I doubt it will make any difference, my corns are sometimes influenced by room lighting, like they usually start getting active from half 7 to 8pm, but sometimes I notice if I have the 'big' light on, they won't come out until it's turned off and the kitchen lights are on, (I have a combined kitchen and front room but the kitchen lights are spotlights facing away from the front room so it's much less bright) but it doesn't harm them. To be honest I only know when my corns are active or not active, couldn't tell you when they were asleep, I wouldn't know how to tell! (Obviously they're not asleep when they're active lol) I probably wake them up half the time when I go to get them out during the day, but they don't seem to care.
 

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If the light is not shining into the tub then I doubt it would affect their day/night cycles since they would naturally have light like moonlight anyway... so as long as it is basically dark when it's supposed to be the cycle is maintained.

But yes, I do agree with you that these cycles are very important. Snakes are very cyclic animals and they do use cues like day length and light to determine whether or not to brumate etc (as well as temperature).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've heard conflicting advice regarding brumnating them too. - i) It's not necessary, and ii) it is necessary.

Reading from here, it's only necessary if you wish for them to breed?
 

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To my mind it's neccesary if they stop feeding.

The point with corns is they cover a vast natural range in North America so those that originate from say Florida will not brumate or have the desire to do so whereas those that originate from further North will brumate because the climate is different.

So really it's a case of let the snake tell you. If it goes off food for a month during November then it is really telling you it wants to brumate and it is wise to do so since it is not going to eat and keeping it warm will keep the metabolism high and it will lose a lot of weight. If it carries on eating all through winter, then there is no harm in not brumating.

For breeding, many have success with just cooling the snakes down to 75F over the winter months and feeding smaller food items over that period then warming up again in spring. This is obviously not a full brumation but is enough to trigger breeding. Other corns will just breed whether brumated or not... this is why there are so many about because they are simple to breed :D

But at the end of the day with brumation, let the snake tell you what it wants to do. There are no hard and fast rules which is why there is so much conflicting advice.
 
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