Reptile Forums banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,191 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Last Monday, My venomous handler, Lee was biten by a Common Death Adder and has since made a full recovery without the help of antivenom. Lee was very lucky to say the least, he has been handling hots for 8 years and is extremely experianced. This is the first bite Lee has suffered from any venomous snake. The bite hasn't put him off in the slightest, in fact quite the oposite, it has been a great learning curve for everyone at Scales and Fangs and certainly brings it home just how dangerous these animals are and lets you see just how important it really is to be as careful as you are. Below is an article from the Echo newspaper.

A REPTILE keeper was left fighting for his life after being bitten by a deadly snake.
Medics raced to save Lee Thompson, 26, of Palace Grove, Laindon, after a highly-venomous Australian Common Death Adder sunk its fangs into his thumb.
Mr Thompson, who has been working with poisonous snakes for eight years, teetered on the brink of death as venom pumped through his body, sending him into renal failure.
He was rushed to Southend Hospital, where the life-saving antivenom took two-and-a-half hours to arrive.
By that time, it was too late to administer. Treatment of his symptoms, as they arose, enabled doctors to stabilise his condition, then he fought his way back to health.
Amazingly, after four days in hospital, Mr Thompson, of Palace Grove, Laindon, was up and about. A week on, he is back at work.
The father-of-two was bitten, at Scales and Fangs, a specialist reptile and snake shop in London Road, Leigh.
Mr Thompson, known to friends as "Lee Snake", said: "I don't know why it happened. I've been handling snakes since I was a boy and I've never been bitten before.
"I was about to put the snake back in his box, but I must have laid him in at slightly the wrong angle, because he reared up and bit me on the right thumb.
"As soon as it happened, I knew I was in trouble."
He was rushed to Southend Hospital, where doctors contacted experts at a London hospital where rare snake antivenoms are kept.
The serum was sent, but doctors could not give it to Mr Thompson, as it came too late to be sure he might not have had a fatal reaction to it.
Mr Thompson added: "I was OK at first, though my hand started to swell.
"I tried to remain calm, but then as the hours went on, I started getting horrendous chest pains. That was then I feared I was going to die.
"Then, hours later, I was told my kidneys were completely collapsing. It got really frightening."
Amazingly Mr Thompson, now almost fully recovered, is still happy to handle the offending snake.
He said: "I'm going to keep him for myself, as he's the first snake to ever bite me.
"I'm not concerned that I'll get bitten again. It doesn't happen very often. There's nothing which could keep my away from working with snakes."
Mr Thompson admitted he was lucky to be alive and thanked staff at the hospital.
He said: "I don't think they get many snakebite cases, so I think I was a bit of a novelty for them!"

Never under estimate the dangers involved in handling hots.

Stay safe guys,

Rob.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,550 Posts
that man has one hell of a lot of fight in him! congrats for pulling through Lee! and thanks for posting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
Glad he's OK and its good that it hasn't put him of in any way. lol, dont think i'd want to keep a 'Death Adder' as a pet :lol2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,628 Posts
WOW glad hes pulled through

Just lucky it wasnt a cobra or something else
hmm, slightly misinformed post there. Most cobra's or arguably all cobra's are not as venomous as this species.

glad he is ok, interesting to hear the effects,has this been published on venomdoc? if not, can i post it there please?

cheers,

Alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
shouldnt it ov been ahell ov a lot worse ? my husband talks about snakes all the time and he said it wasnt his time to go
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,292 Posts
I am glad Lee is okay but do have one question - how can you not know what happenned? Did Lee actually say that or is it the press putting words in his mouth? I know how the press can often misword things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,191 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Yeah of course mate, I will get on there tonight and register.

hmm, slightly misinformed post there. Most cobra's or arguably all cobra's are not as venomous as this species.

glad he is ok, interesting to hear the effects,has this been published on venomdoc? if not, can i post it there please?

cheers,

Alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,191 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I am glad Lee is okay but do have one question - how can you not know what happenned? Did Lee actually say that or is it the press putting words in his mouth? I know how the press can often misword things.
I must say, the press haven't been to bad with this, but you're right, they did get that bit wrong although as some of you know, Lee is very well established with hots and knows what he is doing, it was very unexpected the way the snake reacted. It happened as it was being put back into a tub. Lee had pinned it and then picked it up just behind the head and I had probed it (it was male by the way), Lee was placing it into the tub and had just released it when it recoiled so fast. This technique had been used hundreds of times before so it was a bit of a shock to say the least. Thankfully Lee is OK and we can all learn from it. Lee is training me in HOT handling and the one thing I have learnt is that the same process that has worked for years might not be as safe as antcipated and will work with Lee to find a safer method of release.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,577 Posts
I must say, the press haven't been to bad with this, but you're right, they did get that bit wrong although as some of you know, Lee is very well established with hots and knows what he is doing, it was very unexpected the way the snake reacted. It happened as it was being put back into a tub. Lee had pinned it and then picked it up just behind the head and I had probed it (it was male by the way), Lee was placing it into the tub and had just released it when it recoiled so fast. This technique had been used hundreds of times before so it was a bit of a shock to say the least. Thankfully Lee is OK and we can all learn from it. Lee is training me in HOT handling and the one thing I have learnt is that the same process that has worked for years might not be as safe as antcipated and will work with Lee to find a safer method of release.
restraining tubes are the way forward, I honestly wouldnt want to be without mine, they are such a good but simple design, dont get used much in fact only once, but are so much safer than trying to pin, and the release is easy, a mate of mine thats been keeping 20+ years advised me to get them, and they are a vital bit of kit I recon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,191 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
also what about the 2 1/2 hour thing and the reasoning behind it?
Well!!!!:bash::bash::bash:

We got to the hospital within 10 mins of the bite, the paramedics had contacted the helicoptor and had it on standby at southend hospital and arranged for ambulance transfer from UCH to Guys on arrival, also on stand by. However, the consultant decided Lee was stable enough to stay at Southend and asked for the Antivenom to be sent by Rapid response from London to Southend at 1700hrs on a monday afternoon. the pilot of the helicoptor offered to fly and collect it, this was refused and it was sent by car. 2 and a half hours later it arrived. I think that the decisions that where made had been carried by a lot of luck.

I can tell you that the paramedic team are not happy with the decisions made and will be taking further, lets hope that lessons are learned there too.

Rob.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,191 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
restraining tubes are the way forward, I honestly wouldnt want to be without mine, they are such a good but simple design, dont get used much in fact only once, but are so much safer than trying to pin, and the release is easy, a mate of mine thats been keeping 20+ years advised me to get them, and they are a vital bit of kit I recon.
I was told about these a while back and will definatly be investing in a set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,577 Posts
Well!!!!:bash::bash::bash:

We got to the hospital within 10 mins of the bite, the paramedics had contacted the helicoptor and had it on standby at southend hospital and arranged for ambulance transfer from UCH to Guys on arrival, also on stand by. However, the consultant decided Lee was stable enough to stay at Southend and asked for the Antivenom to be sent by Rapid response from London to Southend at 1700hrs on a monday afternoon. the pilot of the helicoptor offered to fly and collect it, this was refused and it was sent by car. 2 and a half hours later it arrived. I think that the decisions that where made had been carried by a lot of luck.

I can tell you that the paramedic team are not happy with the decisions made and will be taking further, lets hope that lessons are learned there too.

Rob.
I know proff Warrell has said about a 2 hour cut off time, before permanent organ damage can be done. But I wasnt aware that AV wouldnt be given after that amount of time, I have heard of someone getting it days later, all was well but if he had been in a really bad way they would of had no choice
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top