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Hey folks,

I was thinking earlier about the above. I am trying to find some scientific evidence of the effects of depth perception in lizards.

As we know, the majority of lizards have their eyes on the side of their head. When we think of depth perception, we think it is easier to judge distances when your eyes are straight ahead(which would make sense) this is why we can "immitate" 3D as reducing the amount of light into the retena, changes our depth perception and gives us that effect, however this has no effect at night (which would throw that theory out of the window)

My 2 beardies, when hunting kind of tilt their heads to look at their prey before hunting it, i have always assumed this is to gauge the "true depth" thus making it easier to locate their food. It is often said that Beardies (and other lizards) do not have the brain capacity or inteligence to complete simple tasks, however IF when tilting their heads is to get a better perception of depth, this could prove that show a higher level of inteligence than usual - however to balance things out, using 1 eye to look at something in humans is proven that it reduces your depth perception (for example, somebody blind in 1 eye finds it harder to judge distances than somebody with full sight)

Now, this is where things get complicated, i have heard and read that Lizards have a pretty excelent depth perception and is better than mamals (whose eyes are straight facing) - Basically, how can depth perception be said to be alot better when eyes are facing forwards, but in lizards, be better when your eyes on the side of your heads?!?

This is why im tring to find any research done into the topic. If anybody has info would you please be kind enough to share?

Cheers.
 

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I haven't done any real research into it but I think lizards do have some decent degree of depth perception. I've put Panya on the dining room table before, my mum has panicked about her walking off the edge but the instant she gets there she kind of pokes her head over, takes a little glance as if to gauge distance and walks away - which to me suggests she knows pretty well that it's too high for her. I've tested it with my hands as well to see how far apart I can actually take them before she stops trying to get across.
Interestingly with my hamster when I had her... depth perception was not her strong point! She threw herself off my bed, her shelf, my desk... she was not the brightest of beasts!
Disclaimer: I didn't make her do this; she escaped far too many times to count and got herself into ridiculous amounts of mischief! :lol2:
 

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I'm not sure that eyes on the side of head are thought to be worse at depth perception...

Birds have eyes on the side of their head, and they have to judge distance very accurately as they come in to land on a branch etc...

For evidence on how it helps, woth looking at Chams, as most of the time their eys are independent, but when they need to know how far to shoot out their tongue, they use both eyes
 
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