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I've heard that CHE are probably the easiest to maintain as they can run 24/7 but lack natural (i forgot the word for it) of the sun, which apparently halogens and DHP's have.

I was told halogens are the most natural and best for reptiles, but can only be used in the day as they emit light, and CHE's are good at night.

DHP's apparently emit no visible light and are also apparently more natural and better than CHE's for reptiles.

The standard in the UK is CHE right? and I think i'm getting most of this information from american sources and such so i'm not sure, just need confirmation.
 

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I've heard that CHE are probably the easiest to maintain as they can run 24/7 but lack natural (i forgot the word for it) of the sun, which apparently halogens and DHP's have.

I was told halogens are the most natural and best for reptiles, but can only be used in the day as they emit light, and CHE's are good at night.

DHP's apparently emit no visible light and are also apparently more natural and better than CHE's for reptiles.

The standard in the UK is CHE right? and I think i'm getting most of this information from american sources and such so i'm not sure, just need confirmation.
There is no "best" method - It's very dependent on the species of snake, and their natural behaviour. DHP produce the same long wave infrared as the sun so warm the muscle structure up the same way as the sun can warm your arm even on a winters day, However the glow they emit is noticeable to us humans, and there is some speculation that it can also be detected by nocturnal species too. The one major drawback of DHP is the power rating, making them unsuitable for heating large enclosure or large snakes or lizards.

CHE's have many advantages. They radiate infrared which heats the substrate below much the same way as the sun heats the ground, so the snake can get the same belly heat as well at taking in heat form above. The don't emit the same wavelength of infrared as the DHP, so you don't get the deep muscular penetration as you do with DHP. The one main advantage is that they heat the air as well as emitting IR, making them ideal for use with tropical species such a s boa's and pythons.

Halogen lamps can be used, providing a local hot spot, warm the air and some specialist lamps even emit UV and IR. The big disadvantage is that they need to be on 24/7 in order to do so, making them only suitable for snake that range form temperate regions where a drop in temperature at night is natural. UV lights (for reptiles) are available to supplement the light given off from non reptile branded lamps, where the glass normally filters out UV spectrum.

You also often see heat mats used incorrectly. The solid black panelled mats are designed to give out the same long wave infrared as the DHP's and don't heat the air or substrate, which is why the instructions recommend side / back wall mounting, and not to place them on the floor and cover them in insulating substrate such as wood chips or coco-husk, which traps the IR and causes the mat to overheat.

Hope that helps clarify most of the pro's and cons with each type of heating method
 
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