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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone keeping either the Illiger aka Blue Winged Macaw: P. maracana or the Severe aka Chestnut Fronted Macaw: A. severus specifically?

I have experience looking after some of the larger macaw species (A. ararauna, A. militaris, A. chloropterus, A. macao, A. ambiguus & A. hyacinthinus) in a professional capacity but never kept them privately. I am realistic enough to realise that I couldn't accomodate one of the larger species so instead have turned my attention to the above species.

Planning for the future, I would prefer a pair so that they do not rely on human company for companionship.

Any hints or tips which make keeping either of the two species different (besides size) from the larger species?
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Guess that is a not then!! :(
 

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I have had a few over the years, my fav is the yellow collard. Very rarely seen now.

Scarlett from Scarlett's parrots has a severe,

Yes they are smaller, but no less demanding,

The red belly is about the worst suited to captivity and will shout and hardly ever becomes really tame even if you can find a hand reared one.

Severe's are nice and do crop up from time to time. There is a uk face boom group that has CB birds of all species, I think it's called UK parrots to finches sales or similar. A few parrots on there,

If you struggle to find what we call 'dwarf macaws' you could look at the related conures. Not sure why some of the group are referred to conure and not macaw like the rest? They have the same genus being Aratinga.

The Nanday is very 'macaw' like and no less noisy.

My fav from that group is the mitred or red fronted and the blue crowned.

I have kept most of the group over the years.

In terms of being most macaw like, the Nanday and mitred are most similar. With the handy being a screamer and the mitred much much more balanced.

John
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks John,

I am aware of how demanding they are so unlike many people, I do have my eyes wide open. As I said, I would be looking at a pair so they do not crave human attention / interaction. I am not particularly fussy when it comes to tame individuals either.

My intention is to have an indoor area in my conservatory (8ft long x 5ft wide by 8ft high) with access to an outside area of similar dimentions (if not bigger) via a window during the better weather.

I will join the FB group and see what is what - I am not looking to purchase just now but I like to be prepared.

I have had a few over the years, my fav is the yellow collard. Very rarely seen now.

Scarlett from Scarlett's parrots has a severe,

Yes they are smaller, but no less demanding,

The red belly is about the worst suited to captivity and will shout and hardly ever becomes really tame even if you can find a hand reared one.

Severe's are nice and do crop up from time to time. There is a uk face boom group that has CB birds of all species, I think it's called UK parrots to finches sales or similar. A few parrots on there,

If you struggle to find what we call 'dwarf macaws' you could look at the related conures. Not sure why some of the group are referred to conure and not macaw like the rest? They have the same genus being Aratinga.

The Nanday is very 'macaw' like and no less noisy.

My fav from that group is the mitred or red fronted and the blue crowned.

I have kept most of the group over the years.

In terms of being most macaw like, the Nanday and mitred are most similar. With the handy being a screamer and the mitred much much more balanced.

John
 

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I'm of course not trying to "turn you away" from your chosen bird.

But please do look at the Senegal. They're very small but have a ridiculous amount of personality. And with being small they can actually have a good fly around the house. A proper fly.

My Senegal is absolutely brilliant. She does drive me crazy now and and again but I wouldn't change her for the world. Plus they're "quieter" parrots although not quiet.
 

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Years ago, I worked with someone who kept a pair of African Greys in her conservatory. It turned very warm one day whilst she was at work. I'll never forget her scream when her OH rang her having got home from work, to say that the birds were dead. The had literally been cooked in the heat.

We have an African Grey, Senegal, Cockatiels, Budgies, Canaries and did have a Kakariki.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, I have not discounted any species completely at the moment.

I'm of course not trying to "turn you away" from your chosen bird.

But please do look at the Senegal. They're very small but have a ridiculous amount of personality. And with being small they can actually have a good fly around the house. A proper fly.

My Senegal is absolutely brilliant. She does drive me crazy now and and again but I wouldn't change her for the world. Plus they're "quieter" parrots although not quiet.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am aware that (even in Scotland) conservatories can get extremely hot so this would absolutely be taken into consideration.

I think people assume that because these birds come from the tropics that they can handle extremely warm temperatures - what they seem to forget is that in the wild they have the option to cool down whether that be bathing in the local stream or sheltering under the canopy. In an enclosed aviary (especially in a conservatory) there isn't the same option.

Years ago, I worked with someone who kept a pair of African Greys in her conservatory. It turned very warm one day whilst she was at work. I'll never forget her scream when her OH rang her having got home from work, to say that the birds were dead. The had literally been cooked in the heat.

We have an African Grey, Senegal, Cockatiels, Budgies, Canaries and did have a Kakariki.
 
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