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I have kept my green anole or maybe 2 years. I consider myself aa pretty good keeper. Nothing like this has happened before. There were bits of crusty things around her eyes so every day I tried to get a little bit off of her eyes, and i did, and she would be able to see again, but it would just form again. This went on for about a month. I knew something was wrong so i decided to get on the forums in a few days until i looked today. Today i got a crusty thing off of her eyes, but i think what i saw was puss. I dont know what to do. Please help me!
:gasp:
 

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I have kept my green anole or maybe 2 years. I consider myself aa pretty good keeper. Nothing like this has happened before. There were bits of crusty things around her eyes so every day I tried to get a little bit off of her eyes, and i did, and she would be able to see again, but it would just form again. This went on for about a month. I knew something was wrong so i decided to get on the forums in a few days until i looked today. Today i got a crusty thing off of her eyes, but i think what i saw was puss. I dont know what to do. Please help me!
:gasp:
Vet, ASAP.
 

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This is a species with a high Vit A requirement. They obtain this via the full-spectrum of carotenoids in the wild diet,


When this is removed in captivity they suffer Hypovitaminosis-A which is a chronic shortage. This usually manifests as crusting and puss filled areas around the eyes, nose and jaw.


Good vet care is needed ASAP but the animal will need vitamin A therapy alongside adequate UV-B provision. The D3 cycle and the Vit A cycles work together.


Sadly, due to out of date advice and the cost of the animals they have not been afforded the care that they need. This is a diurnal species from a hot and UV rich area with a massively diverse natural diet. This is their developed pathway of use and therefore the basic need.


If we remove part or all of the parameters of supply that they have developed to utilise we enforce a level of imbalance in the body, this then, over time, long or short manifests in a level of disease and further imbalance.


Sadly, by the time they start to display external symptoms the internal disease if far too advanced to treat.


This is not an easy species to keep at all! they have very exacting needs and require space to do well.


Please do see a vet and the very very best of luck!
 
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This is a species with a high Vit A requirement. They obtain this via the full-spectrum of carotenoids in the wild diet,


When this is removed in captivity they suffer Hypovitaminosis-A which is a chronic shortage. This usually manifests as crusting and puss filled areas around the eyes, nose and jaw.


Good vet care is needed ASAP but the animal will need vitamin A therapy alongside adequate UV-B provision. The D3 cycle and the Vit A cycles work together.


Sadly, due to out of date advice and the cost of the animals they have not been afforded the care that they need. This is a diurnal species from a hot and UV rich area with a massively diverse natural diet. This is their developed pathway of use and therefore the basic need.


If we remove part or all of the parameters of supply that they have developed to utilise we enforce a level of imbalance in the body, this then, over time, long or short manifests in a level of disease and further imbalance.


Sadly, by the time they start to display external symptoms the internal disease if far too advanced to treat.


This is not an easy species to keep at all! they have very exacting needs and require space to do well.


Please do see a vet and the very very best of luck!


I agree! Vet visit is highly suggested !


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