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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking into halogen flood lamps as they are a good efficient heat source, but I was wondering if anyone could suggest what wattage would get a hotspot at around 95 degrees at about 20 inches away and also where is the best place in the UK to order or go out and buy them as I cant find much good ones on ebay/amazon : victory:
 

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I use 100w which has the equivalent wattage of approx. 150w standard filament. Floods are best as they have a built in reflector. I can achieve a basking area of over 90f un-statted (when I tested them sans vivarium resident..!) in a 5x2x2 viv, they are a brilliant heat source.. I'll never use standard bulbs again :2thumb:
 

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in a 4 by 2 viv do you think i could get around 95 degrees hot spot with a 60 or 75w halogen about 20 inches from the hotspot? cheers for reply by the way:)
I looked again the ones I ordered previously were 75w so I think you'll be fine, mine have a gap of around 20 inches too but I have a raised platform near to offer a higher temp basking area.
I have quite a cool flat so am using ceramics to even the ambient out and for night heat.

Its worth using larger cages on them as they are wider than standard bulbs and do get very hot :2thumb:
 
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I thought that halogen's aren't an efficient heat source- they were developed to be better light emitters which is why most 'filament' bulbs you see in the supermarkets now actually have halogen bulbs in place of the filament. Because the filaments run at higher temperatures they generate less infra red for the same wattage as a filament bulb, so more of the light output would be reflected out of the viv as visible wavelengths rather than absorbed as IR.

You can put a black material under the bulb such as a piece of slate that will help with the absorption of the visible light rather than reflecting it uselessly.

The advantages they have are the in built reflectors within most of the bulbs, and the filament should last longer than a standard bulb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I thought that halogen's aren't an efficient heat source- they were developed to be better light emitters which is why most 'filament' bulbs you see in the supermarkets now actually have halogen bulbs in place of the filament. Because the filaments run at higher temperatures they generate less infra red for the same wattage as a filament bulb, so more of the light output would be reflected out of the viv as visible wavelengths rather than absorbed as IR.

You can put a black material under the bulb such as a piece of slate that will help with the absorption of the visible light rather than reflecting it uselessly.

The advantages they have are the in built reflectors within most of the bulbs, and the filament should last longer than a standard bulb.
oh interesting, what would you say are the most cost efficient bulbs then for heat/wattage?
 

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I have answered this in full on your thread in the equipment section

John
 

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halogen is way, way more efficient at producing heat than tungsten. In fact they get to almost un-recordable temps at the core of the lamp. As such as we all know light is a by product of heat, if you can produce lots of heat and use lower wattage doing so you will produce light.

in simple terms good halogen lamps produce more heat/light per watt used than tungsten. so a quality halogen will always be a better option. They also do not rely upon a fine tungsten filament in a cradle. As such they last longer than tungsten filament lamps even when used with dimmers.

a quality 50w halogen will produce more heat and reach target temp quicker than a 100w tungsten filament. This means less wattage used for a shorter period of time/double savings. Of course you should also end up buying less lamps per year.

So yep if you want light emitting heat then I have found no source better than halogen to date :)

hope this helps you :)

John


I thought that halogen's aren't an efficient heat source- they were developed to be better light emitters which is why most 'filament' bulbs you see in the supermarkets now actually have halogen bulbs in place of the filament. Because the filaments run at higher temperatures they generate less infra red for the same wattage as a filament bulb, so more of the light output would be reflected out of the viv as visible wavelengths rather than absorbed as IR.

You can put a black material under the bulb such as a piece of slate that will help with the absorption of the visible light rather than reflecting it uselessly.

The advantages they have are the in built reflectors within most of the bulbs, and the filament should last longer than a standard bulb.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
halogen is way, way more efficient at producing heat than tungsten. In fact they get to almost un-recordable temps at the core of the lamp. As such as we all know light is a by product of heat, if you can produce lots of heat and use lower wattage doing so you will produce light.

in simple terms good halogen lamps produce more heat/light per watt used than tungsten. so a quality halogen will always be a better option. They also do not rely upon a fine tungsten filament in a cradle. As such they last longer than tungsten filament lamps even when used with dimmers.

a quality 50w halogen will produce more heat and reach target temp quicker than a 100w tungsten filament. This means less wattage used for a shorter period of time/double savings. Of course you should also end up buying less lamps per year.

So yep if you want light emitting heat then I have found no source better than halogen to date :)

hope this helps you :)

John
thanks for the information, can you suggest a brand of halogen flood lamps to buy and possibly a link to it? thanks! im after a 95 degrees faranheight hotspot about 20 inches above the basking area:2thumb:
 

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As you would expect I can only comment on and can only suggest my own brand :whistling2:

But a 50w Arcadia halogen code SHA50E27 will do it no trouble

John
 

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Sorry to slightly change the subject, if using a 100W halogen bulb, how long would it take to reach it's maximum temperature if it is unstated?

I set up a one last night, after 2 hours it was at 31 degrees c underneath - would it increase much more than this?
 
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