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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:welcome:as above,,thanks:2thumb:
 

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88F and as near to 100% humidity without getting the eggs wet is usually about right.

Although, i only measure the temperature and for humidity I mix one cup of water, to 8 cups of vermiculite. I then add another layer of dry vermiculite for the eggs to sit on. This seems to work fine for me.

You don't want any temperature or humidity variations through incubation, as it can kill the eggs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:2thumb:thanks got new toy juraon pro inc it does it all,,fingers crossed,fist batch:blush:thanks again:notworthy:
88F and as near to 100% humidity without getting the eggs wet is usually about right.

Although, i only measure the temperature and for humidity I mix one cup of water, to 8 cups of vermiculite. I then add another layer of dry vermiculite for the eggs to sit on. This seems to work fine for me.

You don't want any temperature or humidity variations through incubation, as it can kill the eggs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
:2thumb:will 90 humidity b ok,cant seem to get past 90:2thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
:2thumb:got it to 91 now,how wet should vermiculite be,mines damp loose,or should it be wetter to bring humidity up more,thanks,trying to get it all set up by the time she pops..:2thumb:
90% will probably be ok (i think i managed it once at 94%), as long as you don't let it fluctuate too high or low, that's where the main problems arise.

If the eggs start caving in early, then they're not getting enough humidity.
 

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I personally, tend to mix vermiculite to feel rather than to a measurement.

This is just me though...

I add enough water so the mixture clumps together when moulded in my hand (when I close my fist around it) yet when I press my thumb into the clump it breaks apart a bit like dry soil soil/mud would.

Hope this helps.
 

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as said above...

when you squeeze it, it should clump together without any water appearing. The 1 part water to 8 parts vermiculite is something that Ralph uses as a guide, and i think it's about right. You can always add more vermiculite if it's too wet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
:2thumb:im maxing 95 humidity know wetted verm bit more,its holding at 95,,now all i need is me eggs,thanks:2thumb:
 

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Becareful not to get too wet, too much moisture will kill the eggs
 

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88F and as near to 100% humidity without getting the eggs wet is usually about right.

Although, i only measure the temperature and for humidity I mix one cup of water, to 8 cups of vermiculite. I then add another layer of dry vermiculite for the eggs to sit on. This seems to work fine for me.

You don't want any temperature or humidity variations through incubation, as it can kill the eggs.
Jonny what do you use to control the temps? Just a normal pulse stat? What is the maximum fuctuations in temp and humidity before the eggs will die?
 

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I had a problem with my incubator last year, when summer time came along. I tested the incubator in winter time, and it was consistently accurate during that period. Summer came along and created a pretty big temperature variation in the room.

Anyway, inside the incubator i had it go from 90-95F, which probably also cooked the eggs too much. The normal allowance, as far as i know, is +/- 1F, but if you can keep it even closer to 88F, then brilliant. I believe if you get something like a 20% drop or a 20% increase in humidity, you'll probably kill the eggs as well.. this was something VPI tested for, and i don't have their book with me right now, so cant say exactly. It's something along those lines. If i remember right they successfully hatched royals at 70% humidity, but wanted to experiment what would happen if we changed the incubation conditions, during incubation, and both temperature and humidity changes can affect the outcome.

Pulse stats are definitely what i would recommend, on/off's can vary a lot. I would also recommend good air circulation to create even temperatures, if using something like a fridge. I found later on that i greatly benefited from air circulation in the actual room, as well as in the incubator.
 

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I had a problem with my incubator last year, when summer time came along. I tested the incubator in winter time, and it was consistently accurate during that period. Summer came along and created a pretty big temperature variation in the room.

Anyway, inside the incubator i had it go from 90-95F, which probably also cooked the eggs too much. The normal allowance, as far as i know, is +/- 1F, but if you can keep it even closer to 88F, then brilliant. I believe if you get something like a 20% drop or a 20% increase in humidity, you'll probably kill the eggs as well.. this was something VPI tested for, and i don't have their book with me right now, so cant say exactly. It's something along those lines. If i remember right they successfully hatched royals at 70% humidity, but wanted to experiment what would happen if we changed the incubation conditions, during incubation, and both temperature and humidity changes can affect the outcome.

Pulse stats are definitely what i would recommend, on/off's can vary a lot. I would also recommend good air circulation to create even temperatures, if using something like a fridge. I found later on that i greatly benefited from air circulation in the actual room, as well as in the incubator.
Cool thanks.
I am going to be doing the home made poly box inclubator. This is my first time so not wanting to mess it up. Got a digital thermometer and hygrometer so I can keep a close eye on things.
 
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