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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, over the course of the last couple of weeks i've noticed my Beardie's claws have started to curl and he's gradually gotten more lethargic as a result. I keep his nails to what i've been told is an appropriate length by trimming regularly and yet still it's getting worse. Any thoughts?



 

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What is your enclosure floor like? What 'furniture' do you have in there? That is usually a result of inadequate rough stuff in their enclosure for them to sand their nails back with. Im guessing maybe the floor of the enclosure is slick. You need some rocks, climbing furniture, etc and some sort of roughened flooring so that as it moves around the nails get worked down naturally. Can you post a picture of your enclosure?
 
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The claws can become like this because they have;
a) not been worn down or not being clipped often enough
b) not enough being clipped off each time (without clipping the quick of course)
c) they have been clipped incorrectly when the lizard was younger and the regrowth has, over time, been distorted.

However it is also possible they have some kind of disease or condition. My male uro, for example, has a single rear claw that curls. It starts to curl sideways into a spiral, directly from the toe (not half way down like your beardie). He was born with this condition and, because
it will not wear naturally like the rest, I have to clip it quite often.

Looking at the pictures it seem quite clear the curling claws really do need a good clipping. If you are nervous about getting it right yourself then most reputable reptile shops will do it for about £5. A vet will charge an unecessary fortune to do this simple task. However, if the quick has grown too far down the claw you may need to get it done by a vet anyway just in case some bleeding may occur while clipping them to a decent standard.

You really have to be vigilant with claws and a decent claw clipping regime will normally avoid most problems, such as this.
 

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Of course I'd always recommend a Vet visit first so you can view the technique if they let you. Some don't as they know you'll be back next time = more money for them.
But, if you decide to give them a trim dude. Just be careful. If you do draw a little blood, push the bleeding nail into a scent free or medicated bar of soap. It seals the nail and it will heal just fine.
But like above. Most 'decent' repitle shops will sort it for a small fee.
 
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