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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I just wanted to ask a quick but serious question about Hog Noses.

Jamie wants to get a hoggie from the Doncaster show in September if there are any there however i am allergic to bee stings and have been advised not to take the risk in holding one etc.

Is this true and has anyone that has been bitten by these gorgeous little snakes ever had any serious side effects?

Thank You

Lottie
 

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Firstly it does not follow that if you are allergic to a bee sting you will be allergic to a hoggie bite, it is a completely different venom.

The chances of a hoggie biting you is minimal. They usually puff themselves up and hiss, then they may strike with their mouth shut (head butt in other words) if that fails to scare you off they will roll over and play dead. If they do bite it is usually as a feeding response so always use tongs to offer food.

If they do bite they will still have to have a good chew to engage their fangs which are at the back of their mouths.

And after all that you may not be allergic to them anyway but I believe a quick dose of antihistamine can help.

As long as you are careful there should be no problem with you handling them and it would be such a shame to miss out on one of these adorable little characters.
 

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My younger cousin is allergic to bee stings (and a load of other things too) and he has been bitten by one of my baby hoggies when I used to own them. He ended up with a lot more swelling in the bite area than a bite does to me but it never affected his breathing like the stings do. Then again thankfully hoggies dont bite very often, unless they get the skin between your fingers they cant really latch on. I have only ever had bites from very young hoggies. But I guess unless you were bitten you would never fully know. Maybe consider gloves when handling to avoid the risk. Would be a shame if you couldnt handle them at all.
 

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There has been a lot of debate on this forum over hognoses.
You have to bear in mind that hoggies are a rear fanged mildly venomous species with quite impressive adaptations.
The fangs seem to be paired (ie a pair on each side of the jaw) and are hinged, so are usually held flat against the roof of the mouth and rotated down when needed (I will find the quote confirming this). I for one do not subscribe to the "allergy" argument.
My belief is that in most cases people have had a "dry bite" in which the rear fangs were not engaged and so not envenomated.
I spent 7 hours in hospital following a bite from an adult male, during which I had the most excruciating, splitting headache, my right hand swelled to more than twice the size it should be, turned grey, and all the joints went black. This was accompanied by constant "pins and needles" along the entire right arm, and red thread lines running up my arm from the bite. These are signs of envenomation. Weirdly, for about a year after, I had no reaction to stinging nettles or wasps! One member on here has suffered lasting damage to his immune system following a bite and now refuses to keep them.
Envenomated bites ARE rare, but they do happen, usually as a result of a daft mistake by the keeper, in my case handling mice prior to the snake.
 

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This is the quote I was looking for.......

"The snake's enlarged rear maxillary teeth are used as fangs, and several cranial adaptations contribute to subduing prey, including rotation of the maxillae to elevate the posterior teeth into a stabbing position for the injection of the venom (Kapus 1964; Kroll 1976). The venom is produced with both serous and mucous elements in a Duvernoy's gland (Taub 1967) that is connected to the enlarged teeth by a duct. Hiss and Mackessy (1997) reported venom yields of 10-28 µl that contained 55.8-84.0% protein. Painful human envenomations have occured (Bragg 1960; Morris 1985); symptoms include discoloration and swelling of the bitten site and slight continuos bleeding from the wounds. Care should be taken when these snakes are handled." (from the Snakes of the United States and Canada by Carl H. Ernst and Evelyn M. Ernst; page 145)

Hope this helps, bite can be painful, but not serious ;)
 

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Im allergic to my hoggie. Was bitten by him maybe a couple of years ago and had to spend 5 days in hospital, but it was completely my own fault and all that really happened as a side effect is my right hand is slightly and i mean slightly fatter than my left than it was before. Wouldnt even dream of giving up my funny lil snake as it was my stupidity that caused the bite in the first place (plus he was infested with mites and was in a seriously grumpy mood anyways) :lol2:
 

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I havent been bitten, or even close. I have just 1 hoggy who displays defensive behaviour and thats my normal male, the most he gets to is Hiss and then run away, Ive picked him up before he can do anything else, and once hes up hes fine, it not a bit flighty but he doesnt show interest in defending himself, just getting away.

My female + baby albinos are very soft, they neither hiss nor run away, but simply sit in your hand, similar to what I believe a ball python is like (never owned/ held one, just going from pics + videos).

Im not put off by the fact they have venom, and I cant really comment if a serious bite would put me off, I would hope not because I love these snakes.

I think when you have your own hognose, or any snake infact, you know what they behave like, so if one day you go in the tank and they are overly hissy or headbutting more, then they just arent in the mood so just leave them alone. Use feeding tongs and sensible handling and I cant see you having any problems! As the guy who got bit said, his hands were smelling of mice.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you for all your comments. :)

I'm still not very happy about the fact people have spent days in hospital due to a Hoggie bite :S

They are ever so sute though :(

Lottie

:)
 

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rigth you!!!!! hehe
i advised against a hoggie just yet because of the potential risk involved... i wasnt tryin to put u off completely! hehe
ooooo you do panic urself...;)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
rigth you!!!!! hehe
i advised against a hoggie just yet because of the potential risk involved... i wasnt tryin to put u off completely! hehe
ooooo you do panic urself...;)
:) I know im a right wuss lol.

I think it's good that you advised me of the risk because most people that work in shops that sell reptiles don't tell people the pros and cons and they can end up putting both themselves and the animal in danger.

:)

Lottie

ps.... It's their noses i think are cute :blush:
 

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they are cute and are lovely animals, i just dont see the point in not telling people if there could be a potential problem.. its abit irresponsible really!
good luck if you do get one though! :)
 

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Firstly it does not follow that if you are allergic to a bee sting you will be allergic to a hoggie bite, it is a completely different venom.

The chances of a hoggie biting you is minimal. They usually puff themselves up and hiss, then they may strike with their mouth shut (head butt in other words) if that fails to scare you off they will roll over and play dead. If they do bite it is usually as a feeding response so always use tongs to offer food.

If they do bite they will still have to have a good chew to engage their fangs which are at the back of their mouths.

And after all that you may not be allergic to them anyway but I believe a quick dose of antihistamine can help.

As long as you are careful there should be no problem with you handling them and it would be such a shame to miss out on one of these adorable little characters.

definitely agree here! : victory:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
There has been a lot of debate on this forum over hognoses.
You have to bear in mind that hoggies are a rear fanged mildly venomous species with quite impressive adaptations.
The fangs seem to be paired (ie a pair on each side of the jaw) and are hinged, so are usually held flat against the roof of the mouth and rotated down when needed (I will find the quote confirming this). I for one do not subscribe to the "allergy" argument.
My belief is that in most cases people have had a "dry bite" in which the rear fangs were not engaged and so not envenomated.
I spent 7 hours in hospital following a bite from an adult male, during which I had the most excruciating, splitting headache, my right hand swelled to more than twice the size it should be, turned grey, and all the joints went black. This was accompanied by constant "pins and needles" along the entire right arm, and red thread lines running up my arm from the bite. These are signs of envenomation. Weirdly, for about a year after, I had no reaction to stinging nettles or wasps! One member on here has suffered lasting damage to his immune system following a bite and now refuses to keep them.
Envenomated bites ARE rare, but they do happen, usually as a result of a daft mistake by the keeper, in my case handling mice prior to the snake.
Wow, you know how to put me off things!!! :p

I didn't know they had 2 sets of fangs either.

:)
 
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