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i was just wondering how a viv could be too big if you have the space and money surely it would make your pets life better to have as much room as possible?

ive read things like too much space causes stress and they wont be able to find food but surely they dont have 2x1x1 territorys that handily have bowls of gutloaded mealworms outside there hides lol?

i wanted to know as im getting a 3.5 foot viv for my leopard gecko and there will be lots of nice decor in there for her, because i just want the best for her rather than bare minimum, but is there any truth in the space causing stress? thnx in advance: victory:
 

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I have read that leo's do have small territories in the wild...so i guess you might find that yours will find a section of its enclosure that it likes most and stick to it.

Personally i have to agree with you...i cant see how too much space will "stress" them as such.

As for feeding...if you're getting a viv that big then you could devise a way of cordoning off an area for feeding which will not allow bugs to escape all over the place...and possibly place 2 or 3 bowls of mealies along the length of the tank until you find where the leo is going to spend its time.

I'm sure if there is any truth in this then someone will confirm it: victory:
 

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I've always believed that the suggestion the animals prefer small vivs, is the keeper trying to justify keeping them in minimally sized enclosures.
 

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my leopard gecko is in a 42 x 21 inch viv, and uses all the space. there is a half which she prefers, but she loves the extra space it gives her. and she has no problems finding food. when i come into my room at night she comes up to the front of the viv and watches me getting out the food and goes to wherever i drop it in. when she first went in she stayed hidden for about a week, but has now been in it for about 2 months with no signs of stress or deteriorating health. i see her exploring more often in this viv than in her old 30 inch viv. go for it with the bigger viv.
tom
 

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lots of people talk about vivs being too small, and how they have observed animals getting "stressed" by large enclosures and hiding all the time. im not sure anyone is qualified to make that judgement, reptiles dont behave in the same way as humans. i think that a larger viv is always better, you can never put an animal in too large a space. in the wild they are in a vast space, and have evolved over millions of years with this being the case. so long as the space represents a naturalistic environment, then there should never be any issues.

for example, if a lizard lives in a tiny cave in the wild, you wouldnt want to give it a 10' cube of wide open space with lots of lighting and 40°C temperatures. if a realistic environment is provided, then bigger is always better IMO. if you provided a 10' cube with loads of small cave arrangements plus some "outside" areas then that would be more realistic than a 12" cube with one tiny cave setup in it.

i think a lot of the "you can go too big" arguments stem from inadequate setup and equipment. for example, most people use UV tubes which give off minimal amounts of UVB compared to the sun. in large enclosures the UV is then insufficient for the space available, and the same can apply to heating. having a very large viv means youll need lots more furniture, that is typically quite expensive, and thus large vivs can often end up quite empty - lack of hiding places and shelter are probably a fairly large contributor to stress in captive animals. i improved the cover in my water dragon viv and my baby water dragons went from hiding under a piece of bark all day to running around the viv all day, but hiding behind plants instead.

also, lots of people say that babies should be kept in smaller enclosures to avoid being stressed out. but in the wild they get no such luxury. again, if you provide plenty of shelter and suitable conditions i dont see that it should ever be an issue. i think captive reptile keeping is far too textbook at times, if the reptiles dont have everything on a plate then its deemed as being "cruel" or "incorrect husbandry". giving captive animals a realistic representation of the wild is surely quite important in their development, i feed my water dragons with loose roaches and locusts and release them at various places in the viv and then let them run wild! water dragons have to catch the food if they want it, and whilst im not qualified to say whether a lizard is "enjoying" an activity, id like to think they are when they are running around like mentalists jumping from plant to plant and scrambling down vines hunting down roaches and locusts. far more so than if i stick a box of roaches in there that cant get away, its too easy.
 

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lots of people talk about vivs being too small, and how they have observed animals getting "stressed" by large enclosures and hiding all the time. im not sure anyone is qualified to make that judgement, reptiles dont behave in the same way as humans. i think that a larger viv is always better, you can never put an animal in too large a space. in the wild they are in a vast space, and have evolved over millions of years with this being the case. so long as the space represents a naturalistic environment, then there should never be any issues.

for example, if a lizard lives in a tiny cave in the wild, you wouldnt want to give it a 10' cube of wide open space with lots of lighting and 40°C temperatures. if a realistic environment is provided, then bigger is always better IMO. if you provided a 10' cube with loads of small cave arrangements plus some "outside" areas then that would be more realistic than a 12" cube with one tiny cave setup in it.

i think a lot of the "you can go too big" arguments stem from inadequate setup and equipment. for example, most people use UV tubes which give off minimal amounts of UVB compared to the sun. in large enclosures the UV is then insufficient for the space available, and the same can apply to heating. having a very large viv means youll need lots more furniture, that is typically quite expensive, and thus large vivs can often end up quite empty - lack of hiding places and shelter are probably a fairly large contributor to stress in captive animals. i improved the cover in my water dragon viv and my baby water dragons went from hiding under a piece of bark all day to running around the viv all day, but hiding behind plants instead.

also, lots of people say that babies should be kept in smaller enclosures to avoid being stressed out. but in the wild they get no such luxury. again, if you provide plenty of shelter and suitable conditions i dont see that it should ever be an issue. i think captive reptile keeping is far too textbook at times, if the reptiles dont have everything on a plate then its deemed as being "cruel" or "incorrect husbandry". giving captive animals a realistic representation of the wild is surely quite important in their development, i feed my water dragons with loose roaches and locusts and release them at various places in the viv and then let them run wild! water dragons have to catch the food if they want it, and whilst im not qualified to say whether a lizard is "enjoying" an activity, id like to think they are when they are running around like mentalists jumping from plant to plant and scrambling down vines hunting down roaches and locusts. far more so than if i stick a box of roaches in there that cant get away, its too easy.
totaly agree you nailed every point i was going to make as well!
 

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I use a 36 inch viv with two levels for my leo, I still think he could use more space. He climbs all over the back wall, up the ramp and is always in and out of each hide.
 
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