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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

Just looking for some thoughts & opinions on whether adding another feathery monster to our family would be a good idea or not.

We’ve got a 13 month old hand reared B&G macaw currently - & although we spend as much time with him as we can, he is sometimes left for a few hours whilst we’re both out of the house. We’re looking at buying a bigger house next year, & are toying with the idea of getting him a friend so we don’t feel as guilty whilst we’re out.

Separate cages & no unsupervised playtime obviously, if we were to go ahead.

Just wanted some input from people who keep multiple parrots really - how did you find the introductory process? Would you recommend doing it? Did they become less bonded to you in the process?

I think the safest option would be another macaw to ‘match’ his energy levels & strength/boisterousness. Possibly a scarlet.

Ideally hoping for real-life experiences, not regurgitated online into - I’ve read a lot online so now I’m really just wanting to hear from people who have first hand experience of owning more than one bird.

Thanks!




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Beautiful bird. We lost our African Grey on Sunday night - aged approx 50+. His cage was next to our Senegal's. They 'chatted' together, but never mixed. We also keep Cockatiels, Budgies, Canaries and Parrotlets (bar the Canaries) all in a mixed indoor aviary.

Sorry, not any help, but purely posting, hopefully from an interest point of view!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Beautiful bird. We lost our African Grey on Sunday night - aged approx 50+. His cage was next to our Senegal's. They 'chatted' together, but never mixed. We also keep Cockatiels, Budgies, Canaries and Parrotlets (bar the Canaries) all in a mixed indoor aviary.



Sorry, not any help, but purely posting, hopefully from an interest point of view!


So sorry to hear that, hopefully you can take some comfort in the fact that he had a good innings!

Sounds quite positive though - even if they never mixed, he could have a friend to chat to during the times we’re out of the house.


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hi there
I did what you are thinking a few years ago
and landed up with both birds turning spiteful
towards the wife and myself and could not handle them what so ever
so at to get rid of one of the birds
it would be different if you had got the both bird at the same time
hope this helps
 

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Beautiful bird. We lost our African Grey on Sunday night - aged approx 50+. His cage was next to our Senegal's. They 'chatted' together, but never mixed. We also keep Cockatiels, Budgies, Canaries and Parrotlets (bar the Canaries) all in a mixed indoor aviary.

Sorry, not any help, but purely posting, hopefully from an interest point of view!
So sorry to read that.
 

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Thank you. Spent the morning dismantling the cage and cleaning the living room. Re-arranged it somewhat. I must say it is the Senegal who is the messier eater!
I have a Senegal. She wastes far more than she eats. It doesn't go to waste though as I give it all to my dad for his chickens/geese/turkeys/ducks.
 
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We do not have any Macaws here at the moment but have six rescued Conures. They all came in separately (bar two that were found stray together and presumed brother and sister), several from owners that swore they would never get on with other birds. All but one are hand reared. We now have a happy, functional flock of four Green Cheeked Conures and a closely bonded pair of Sun Conures. The Green Cheeks are all still as sociable with us as when they were alone and when let out you walk around with them all hanging off you! The Sun Conures came in separately as a nervous hand reared female and a previously hand reared, but untouched for years, male. In the cage they are both now very protective. The male generally refuses to come out but when the female is out alone she still enjoys human contact. These two very definitely prefer each other to us. The Green Cheeks vary on preference (one was kept alone for 7 years so is still very human orientated, but has still taken a mate) but all function well with both. Parrots are social, flock birds, normally living with their family group 24/7. With the best will in the world we cannot hope to replicate that with a lone bird. Even hand reared parrots are normally reared in groups of siblings, not alone, so are still very much aware of what another parrot is. They bond with us for lack of a better option when kept alone but given the choice most really appreciate company of their own species. This is true when mixing different species of birds too. At one point we had just a single Green Cheek and a single Sun Conure. They got on well, would share a cage, preen each other etc, but when more Green Cheeks arrived they formed their own same species flock and kicked the Sun Conure out, leaving her alone again until the male arrived. Given that I would recommend getting another B&G rather than a Scarlet. The two species can certainly bond, and even breed, but if given the choice most prefer their own kind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
We do not have any Macaws here at the moment but have six rescued Conures. They all came in separately (bar two that were found stray together and presumed brother and sister), several from owners that swore they would never get on with other birds. All but one are hand reared. We now have a happy, functional flock of four Green Cheeked Conures and a closely bonded pair of Sun Conures. The Green Cheeks are all still as sociable with us as when they were alone and when let out you walk around with them all hanging off you! The Sun Conures came in separately as a nervous hand reared female and a previously hand reared, but untouched for years, male. In the cage they are both now very protective. The male generally refuses to come out but when the female is out alone she still enjoys human contact. These two very definitely prefer each other to us. The Green Cheeks vary on preference (one was kept alone for 7 years so is still very human orientated, but has still taken a mate) but all function well with both. Parrots are social, flock birds, normally living with their family group 24/7. With the best will in the world we cannot hope to replicate that with a lone bird. Even hand reared parrots are normally reared in groups of siblings, not alone, so are still very much aware of what another parrot is. They bond with us for lack of a better option when kept alone but given the choice most really appreciate company of their own species. This is true when mixing different species of birds too. At one point we had just a single Green Cheek and a single Sun Conure. They got on well, would share a cage, preen each other etc, but when more Green Cheeks arrived they formed their own same species flock and kicked the Sun Conure out, leaving her alone again until the male arrived. Given that I would recommend getting another B&G rather than a Scarlet. The two species can certainly bond, and even breed, but if given the choice most prefer their own kind.


Thanks for taking the time to reply!

You’ve given me a lot to think about, I think I’m swaying towards letting him have a friend when we move house.


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