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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a thought.
If and when I get my Chameleon and I get on well with him, would there likely be a market for me to enter into breeding them?

I've read babies have to have a constant supply of food, which is fine as I expect my colonies will still be going in a year or two!

I'm nt worried about profit, I just love breeding Reptile :) but, breaking even would be preferred lol.
 

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When considering breeding, never just go off the price that CB hatchlings are fetching at this point in time.

Over the post two years, the average retail price for a hatchling Yemen chameleon has dropped from £70 to £40.

Now lets say it takes you about two years to get a male and female up to size, with enclosures and an incubator. Cost wise, you will be into it for a good amount of money. Then take into account the drop in price that Yemen's will take in those two years. Breaking even may not even be an option.

I am by no means saying that it's about the profit, or even breaking even for that matter. In fact, if you are a hobby breeder then making a profit is highly unlikely. But what you must think about is can you find the funds to pay for all the expenses of breeding Chameleons? Without being able to fall back on the funds produced from selling the hatchlings?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When considering breeding, never just go off the price that CB hatchlings are fetching at this point in time.

Over the post two years, the average retail price for a hatchling Yemen chameleon has dropped from £70 to £40.

Now lets say it takes you about two years to get a male and female up to size, with enclosures and an incubator. Cost wise, you will be into it for a good amount of money. Then take into account the drop in price that Yemen's will take in those two years. Breaking even may not even be an option.

I am by no means saying that it's about the profit, or even breaking even for that matter. In fact, if you are a hobby breeder then making a profit is highly unlikely. But what you must think about is can you find the funds to pay for all the expenses of breeding Chameleons? Without being able to fall back on the funds produced from selling the hatchlings?
And this is the exact answer I was looking for, I suppose when I say market, I mean I know they produce a lot of Eggs, so would I be able to move them on easy enough, the last thing I want is the be like the people that breed took many Beardies.
When it comes to having fall back funds, I always make sure there's a few quid in the vet fund account for te Leo's so I'd make sure the was double if I were also breeding Chameleons.
I always have spare vivariums, tanks and exos in the attic, some tall, some small ;) and providing they don't break, I have a couple of incubators.
It is just a hobby, and like people say, profit or breaking even is at least preferred, I'd do it for the joy of the hatchlings but only if there were people wanting to home them :)
In and ideal world I'd keep them all, but space and common sense (mother) does not allow.

I suppose this was just a testing the water kind of thing. I'll see how the land lies if it ever comes to a point where I decide to breed them.
 
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As above the prices have fell allot recently. I sold mine £40 rivate and shops took them for £12 at 6 weeks.

I know my local breeds some themselves and also with monkfield breeding hundreds if not thousands each year there is always plenty available. They do cost allot when babies and will go through one box of live food a day and they should be kept and sold when 3 months so allot of food and they always seem to have large clutches.

If you cant sell then if they get too old they need to be seperated so there is no agression and males will start to breed early on.

They are great to hatch but it is hard to tell what the market would be like at that time because of their long incubation period.
 

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Id say by the time youu got them to the age there won't be a market for them for some time, I've seen alot for sale lately and people even trying to sell eggs instead of waiting for them to hatch (rediculous idea if you ask me) in bulk because they have so many. obviously I cant see the future but thats where i would say its headed hun.
 

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And this is the exact answer I was looking for, I suppose when I say market, I mean I know they produce a lot of Eggs, so would I be able to move them on easy enough, the last thing I want is the be like the people that breed took many Beardies.
When it comes to having fall back funds, I always make sure there's a few quid in the vet fund account for te Leo's so I'd make sure the was double if I were also breeding Chameleons.
I always have spare vivariums, tanks and exos in the attic, some tall, some small ;) and providing they don't break, I have a couple of incubators.
It is just a hobby, and like people say, profit or breaking even is at least preferred, I'd do it for the joy of the hatchlings but only if there were people wanting to home them :)
In and ideal world I'd keep them all, but space and common sense (mother) does not allow.

I suppose this was just a testing the water kind of thing. I'll see how the land lies if it ever comes to a point where I decide to breed them.
Yemen's will go the same way as Beardie's, Leo's and Corn's. There will be that many around that people will be literally giving them away.
 

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i work in a reptile shop and can honestly say iv sold 3 times the amount of yemens than i have beardies and leos combined the difference between this year and last year is mad i can see them being the new beardie in the next couple of years
 
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