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Discussion Starter #1
Recently my Springer was rehomed due to needing some special care due to aggression. Since then if I leave the house my Jack Russell, now alone, howls very loudly. My neighbour thankfully told me about it but he still seems to have complained to the council as I received a letter from them today.

He has complained before to the council, rather than talking to me directly when my Springer was here as they used to bark when other dogs went past. Holly (Jack Russell) doesn't do this now since Max (Springer) has left, She never used to howl though as she always had company.

I don't think another dog is an option so need to solve the problem rather than mask it.

Any advice people?

I was going to contact the trainer who assessed Max and found him a home but would appreciate any comments on things to try starting immediately!

She doesn't do it immediately when I leave, maybe waits a minute or two. I recorded her today on a dictaphone and she howling with no more than 2 minute breaks consistently for over an hour :(
 

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Try leaving the telly or a radio on (at a low volume) to break the silence, toys and a softtoy for her to cuddle with.

Oh, and your neighbour's a douche.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I work from home, during the day she is mostly in the kitchen whilst I work at the computer upstairs so she isn't used to 24 hours attention, she would also be in the kitchen whenever I go out and that's where her bed and food/water are. This was always the case as Max would find something he shouldn't to pick up and break. I would like her to have a bit more free run of the house during the day but think at the moment that might make her worse.
 

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It sounds like she has separation anxiety. You could try using Rescue Remedy (Holland and Barrett) or getting something similar from the vet. It might be worth getting an appointment or phoning them up to see what is available.

Before you go out don't fuss with her too much, if you do she will know what's coming. It is best to act like normal and ignore her about 10 minutes before leaving.

You could try buying a kong or nylon bone, this will give her something to occupy her time whilst you are out. If you only allow her to have this toy whilst you are out, and put it away when you are back, she will associate the toy with you not 'leaving forever' and it will help her understand that you are coming back. This can help her feel more secure.
 

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A training method to help Holly is as follows:

1) Put your coat on & leave the house for a moment, then return, take your coat off & sit down. Ignore Holly throughout.

2) Repeat the above a few times, but each time try to extend the amount of time your out (only in small jumps).

3) Eventually you should be able to be out of the house for a few minutes, as Holly realises you aren't leaving her forever.

You may need to repeat this routine a few times a day, for a few days, but it helps to teach Holly that when you leave the house & her, nothing bad happens, & that you always return, even after a while.
 

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My was like this, by leaving the tv on and leaving him with a dressing gown that you wear, seems to have calmed him down, no whining now, just excited when you. Get home!
 
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