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Hey, my name is tommy and i have a leopard gecko that, in my opinion, isnt doing too well. His tail had a small gray spot, like a stuck shed, but it wasn't. I took him to a vet and had him checked out and the vet said its nothing/didnt know what it was. So i thought he was ok. After a few sheds, it started to fade away. But then it came back, and much much worse. The gray spot covers about 45% of his tail, and about 65% of his tail has a red tint. Like where it used to be a clean white color, it is now a tint of red. I know taking him to a vet wont do much because they act like they dont know what they are doing (in my place, not in general) and i have no idea what to do right now. I am considering surgically removing his tail, by a professional, if i cannot figure out what is wrong with his tail, Because i feel like it could spread to his body and possible hurt/kill him. I cannot find anything online that is even close to what he has. So i have no clue what it is, i guess not many vets know either. So if anyone has any ideas on what to do or anything please let me know, and if you need pictures, please email me at [email protected]. Thanks.
 

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It doesn't sound nice but if it comes down to it, I would probably make the leo drop its tail rather than surgically remove it. Surgery in the long run would be a lot more stressful and risky for the leo than encouraging it to drop naturally
 

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I have received a couple of photos now and will try to upload them later. I can see what Tommy means about his Leo's tail. The tail tip definitely appears to have come off half of the tail appears to be greying in colour.
 

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Right here are the photos. Tommy says that the tip of the tail has always been like that but obviously the colouring hasn't.

Before pic:



After pic:



I advised he see a reptile vet which he is trying to sort out but in the meantime if anyone can offer any help or ideas he would appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It doesn't sound nice but if it comes down to it, I would probably make the leo drop its tail rather than surgically remove it. Surgery in the long run would be a lot more stressful and risky for the leo than encouraging it to drop naturally
How does surgically removing his tail cause those problems? And how do encourage him to drop his tail? Thanks for your feedback!
 

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He would require another vet trip which can be stressful in themselves. He would need anaesthetic, removing the tail surgically will cause an open wound with bleeding, and you will probably be given pain meds and some to prevent infection during recovery. With tail dropping their is no blood loss, very little chance of infection and no recovery time. I know vets who have forced tails to drop, not sure how they do it to be honest.

How does surgically removing his tail cause those problems? And how do encourage him to drop his tail? Thanks for your feedback!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
He would require another vet trip which can be stressful in themselves. He would need anaesthetic, removing the tail surgically will cause an open wound with bleeding, and you will probably be given pain meds and some to prevent infection during recovery. With tail dropping their is no blood loss, very little chance of infection and no recovery time. I know vets who have forced tails to drop, not sure how they do it to be honest.

How does surgically removing his tail cause those problems? And how do encourage him to drop his tail? Thanks for your feedback!

Ahh alright thanks! I want to try to figure out what he has before dropping his tail. But thank you for your info!
 

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I personally would not advise you attempt to get him to drop his tail. Whereabouts are you as we may be able to advise a good reptile vet in your area?
 

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A geckos natural defence is to shed it's tail if a predator grabs it the tail wiggles detracting the predator so they can make there escape they seal off the blood flow to the tail it should grow back I keep my geckos on dry play sand I know this because my male gecko grabbed the females tail trying mate with her the tail shed and was wiggling and it grow a new tail with about a year all was good again but the tail shorter

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Discussion Starter #19
To everyone here, should i just get his tail removed?, since of all the hundreds of people i asked, nobody knows what it is
 

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Personally my answer would be no. You need to find a good reptile vet to see if you can find out what the problem is. I had a female Leo drop her tail during a breeding incident and she died a few days later. The tail drop may not have been the cause but I don't think it is something to take lightly.
 
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