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Discussion Starter #1
Lobster Roaches:

Lobster Cockroaches: Ideal for the majority of reptiles: high protein, soft bodied, low chitin content, do not smell, Livebearers and prolific and will not bite your herp! Easy to care for and culture. Care guide given.

Revised prices due to popular demand!

Lobster Roach Prices:

25 £4

50 £7

100 £13

200 £24

300 £35 Ideal starter culture size!

Larger quantities available, please email for details. Special delivery or standard delivery options available.
 

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I would but can't stand the thought of having cockroaches loose in my house! Crickets yes, cockroaches no!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
welshgaz said:
I would but can't stand the thought of having cockroaches loose in my house! Crickets yes, cockroaches no!

These ones don't survive lose in your house as they are tropical. They need to huddle and don't like to be away from their mates! :lol:
 

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ianyork said:
have you got any pics of these mate and the setups they require? also how big do they get?
They get to around 40mm when adult. I keep mine in large plastic tubs, or plastic tanks, or an aquarium will do also. Cardbord or egg boxs for them to live on, no substrate required. Feed on fresh green salad, dry dog or cat food, fruit, etc. In fact they will eat almost anything! Pics in a minute or so.

Small size cultures can be kept in a marge tub, the more you have the larger the tub required.
 

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Not convinced! Sorry... Have heard that are very good feeders though, variable sizes as they breed very very quickly :shock:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
welshgaz said:
Not convinced! Sorry... Have heard that are very good feeders though, variable sizes as they breed very very quickly :shock:

They do breed very easily and quickly yes, what are you not convinced about having them in your house or their value as feeders?


 

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Rickeezee said:
welshgaz said:
Not convinced! Sorry... Have heard that are very good feeders though, variable sizes as they breed very very quickly :shock:

They do breed very easily and quickly yes, what are you not convinced about having them in your house or their value as feeders?


Oh in the house! Not as feeders. I believe they are very good food just can't stand cockroaches! (had problems in uni with them and its stuck, don't think I could handle them running around again (let alone the neighnours!))
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Fair play, I must say I have not had a problem like that with them. But I understand your viewpoint .
 

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Rickeezee said:
These ones don't survive lose in your house as they are tropical. They need to huddle and don't like to be away from their mates! :lol:
But what if they all escape together and huddle with their mates round your house :shock: :lol:

Can you let me know if they climb plastic and do they give birth to worms or little roaches? And how long do they take to start breeding?

And Whats your delivery price for 25 standard postage?
 

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tombraider said:
Rickeezee said:
These ones don't survive lose in your house as they are tropical. They need to huddle and don't like to be away from their mates! :lol:
But what if they all escape together and huddle with their mates round your house :shock: :lol:

Can you let me know if they climb plastic and do they give birth to worms or little roaches? And how long do they take to start breeding?

And Whats your delivery price for 25 standard postage?
They breed like wildfire and can climb anything! I've heard if you put a rim of vasiline around the top of you box they won't go over that and stay in your container
 

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Discussion Starter #12
tombraider said:
Rickeezee said:
These ones don't survive lose in your house as they are tropical. They need to huddle and don't like to be away from their mates! :lol:
But what if they all escape together and huddle with their mates round your house :shock: :lol:

Can you let me know if they climb plastic and do they give birth to worms or little roaches? And how long do they take to start breeding?

And Whats your delivery price for 25 standard postage?

They wont all escape at once, unless you release them, and have a party and invite their mates round, easy to stop them, just smear a wee bit of Vaseline around the tub rim they wont cross this barrier.

Lobster roaches mature at about 3-4 months old. Females carry young for approximately one month and give live birth to 30-40 babies every month or so. The young are very small, about 3/16 of an inch but grow quickly. As long as there is enough high protein food, plus a moisture source, all live peaceably together.

I send out mixed sizes so that they don't all peak at once. Adults are included and will give birth within days of receipt.

Postage and packing for standard delivery is £2.80 for up to 300 roaches.


They are live bearers and give birth to mini replicas of themselves, not worms.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Lobster Roaches

(Nauphoeta cinerea)


Native to the Caribbean region. Lobster roaches climb glass. Very fast breeders.

Lobster roaches make exceptional feeder insects. They grow up to one and a quarter inches as adults, making them only slightly larger at maturity than adult crickets. Lobster roaches are soft bodied roaches, their exoskeleton is thinner than many other kinds of roaches, thus making them a high meat to shell ratio feeder. Lobster roaches have wings but can not fly. They do not smell. Even the most finicky of reptiles love them. Critters just can’t get enough of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Quote:

Roaches make both great feeders and interesting low maintenance pets. Children usually find them fascinating, plus they are very easy to keep and are easy to raise. Roaches are eagerly preyed upon by even the most finicky insectivores. Lizards, aquatic turtles, box turtles, frogs, toads, snakes, arachnids, and larger tropical fish all enjoy them. Baby roaches are about the size of a ladybug, so you easily have the appropriate size feeder readily available for herps of all sizes.

Feeder roaches are easy to keep since they accept a wide range of foods and thrive on high protein diets, making them lower in fat content. Once established, they breed readily, making them easily cultured at home. More nutritious than crickets or mealworms, feeder roaches have a higher meat to shell ratio than either crickets or mealworms, making them easier to digest.

Roaches are quiet, they don’t drive you insane with their constant chirping. Roaches don’t jump all over the place, making them easier to contain. Roaches are long lived with a lifespan of a year or more. Roaches don’t smell and don’t need their cages cleaned as often. Roaches don’t bite.

Our feeder roaches are not the pest species house roaches seen running for cover when the lights go on. Those pests are generally American (Periplaneta americana) or German (Blattella germanica) cockroaches. Instead, our feeder roaches are tropical roaches from warm faraway places. Tropical roaches will not infest your home, even if they accidentally escape. We offer Madagascar Hissing Roaches (Gromphradorhina portentosa), Lobster Roaches (Nauphoeta cinerea), Orange Headed Roaches (Eublaberus prosticus), Discoid Roaches (Blaberus discoidales), Guyana Orange Spotted Roaches (Blaptica dubia), Blaberus craniifer hybrid Roaches (Blaberus species), Six Spotted Roaches (Eublaberus distanti) and Turkistan Roaches (Blatta lateralis
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hope all of the above information helps. I started of with a colony of 300 and now have thousands. I would advise if you want to breed them not to feed them off to soon. If you want to just feed them without the bother of breeding them then do so! All depends how big your herp collection is!
 

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what ratio would you feed these to say a 6 month old beardie? ie same amount of roaches as you would crickets???also do these require been coated in calcium supplement, i know it sounds a daft question but if they are more nutrious for the animal are supplements needed in as great quantities???

i am interested in these as i want to breed food for my beardie (greedy sod!) but dont fancy breeding crickets. will these survive left in the garage in a tub or do they require a heatmat underneath them due to being tropical?does humidity need to be taken into consideration?

to setup a sustainable colony which doesnt get out of control for a single beardie, how many would you recommend?

sorry for all the questions fella, just curious :D
 

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Discussion Starter #17
ianyork said:
what ratio would you feed these to say a 6 month old beardie? ie same amount of roaches as you would crickets???also do these require been coated in calcium supplement, i know it sounds a daft question but if they are more nutrious for the animal are supplements needed in as great quantities???

i am interested in these as i want to breed food for my beardie (greedy sod!) but dont fancy breeding crickets. will these survive left in the garage in a tub or do they require a heatmat underneath them due to being tropical?does humidity need to be taken into consideration?

to setup a sustainable colony which doesnt get out of control for a single beardie, how many would you recommend?

sorry for all the questions fella, just curious :D
Good questions, you would still need to supplement calcium as reptiles find it hard to assimilate this in their bodies so need that extra bit of help, when a reptile basks this in part is to help absorption of the calcium. You will notice that a herp basks after eating, this is why. Lobster roaches are high in protein, but still your beardie will require the usual supplements that are, calcium and a multi vitamin / mineral supplement. I give my bds calcium x3 per week and multi vits / mins x1 per week.

Dust in the usual manner or pre-gutload the roaches with the supplements.

I feed my beardies as much as they can eat within one feeding session no more, all depends upon the growth pattern and weight of the animal, best to gauge by what the beardie will eat in say about ten minutes.

I keep my roaches in plastic tubs, on a heat mat unstated. 300 is a good size culture to ensure you never run out, the initial cost is easily saved as you will no longer need to buy crickets. If you want to control the breeding rate of the roaches just lower the temperature or even take them of the heat mat they will still breed at room temperature but not as fast. To begin with keep em nice and hot to establish a good size colony. Then regulate by lowering heat.
 

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cool cheers for that, and my beardie is a fat little git who eats everything in sight bar veggies :lol:

one last question, whats your method for catching them? as i have a spare tub 20"x10"x10" which i was going to house them in and just wondering if they are going to have to have the mini hoover treatment for capture :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Jack13 said:
can these be a stable diet? instead of crickets?

Yes in Europe and the USA they have gone down this route many years ago, we are just way behind! Variety is still good though but crickets can be omitted and roaches used instead yes. Unlike crickets roaches DO NOT: SMELL, BITE, CARRY PARASITES, REQUIRE COMPLEX BREEDING PROGRAMES, ARE MORE NUTRITIOUS THAN CRICKETS AND REQUIRE LESS LOOKING AFTER!
 
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