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Discussion Starter #1
An image from tonight of one of the two captive bred babies i bought a few months ago.

Of the two this is the smaller one as it is still a hit and miss feeder.

Its mate is taking three small rat pups a week where as this one is still on a pinkies or so every four days.

This one is still calm and the bigger one bites very well thanks

 

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Discussion Starter #4
feeding

Thanks they are both in great condition though its a shame the little one is not as good a feeder.

Still thats how it goes sometimes.:bash:
 

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"Still that's how it goes sometimes"

Don't I know it... :devil:

It used to take me HOURS to feed all the little bu:censor:ers in my collection that would refuse food... sometimes a whole weekend to get them all sorted.

Although it's a great feeling when they finally start eating and begin to put on weight and move around as normal! It's part of the joy and challenge of this type of snake (fussy eaters I mean).

Fortunately pretty much all of my animals are happily chowing down by themselves every week now. But I've got a new lot coming in on Friday that will probably occupy me for a while...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
?????

"Still that's how it goes sometimes"

Don't I know it... :devil:

It used to take me HOURS to feed all the little bu:censor:ers in my collection that would refuse food... sometimes a whole weekend to get them all sorted.

Although it's a great feeling when they finally start eating and begin to put on weight and move around as normal! It's part of the joy and challenge of this type of snake (fussy eaters I mean).

Fortunately pretty much all of my animals are happily chowing down by themselves every week now. But I've got a new lot coming in on Friday that will probably occupy me for a while...
I'm intrigued:mf_dribble:
 

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I'm intrigued:mf_dribble:
1.2 Psammophis sibilans, 1.2 Psammophis schokari, 1.1 Coluber florentulus and 1.1 Coluber rogersi. All fresh from Egypt and from a reliable and well-known importer.

The P. sibilans should be no problem, I've had plenty of WC Montpellier snakes (Malpolon) which are very similar. They reputedly will happily take rodents by the bucketload. But I'm wondering about the P. schokari and Coluber sp. Some whip snakes I've had (Hierophis viridiflavus and Hemorrhois hippocrepis) present no real problem to get feeding... but others (Platyceps najadum and Hemorrhois algirus) can be nightmares...

(I know this is the DWA forum, but P. sibilans, like Boiga dendrophila, WAS on DWA...):whistling2:
 

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Hey Slippery, your mangrove is looking great, looks very healthy and what a superb photograph - one to be entered into a few photo competitions I feel.

For those who experience difficulty feeding boigas:-
Feeding young boigas is not really that difficult people, it simply takes a bit of patience and a bit of dedication on your part. For any that will not feed on their own I now just jump straight into a semi assist feed and continue this for at least a couple of months. I wait til its dark sit them on my knee in a tub and simply hold them behind the head and pop the pinkie into the mouth, most will open their mouths when simply pushing a pinkie head gently against it. Once it has taken it into its mouth then move extremely slowly or it WILL spit it out. Slowly lower it to the floor of the tub and very slowly let go of the head. If you move too quick it WILL spit it out so dont be tempted to move. Give yourself 20-30 minutes per hatchling, they will get quicker given time but you just have to be patient. Continue with this regime so that it is getting regular food. Do not handle the youngster as they almost all get stressed very easily and most will go off their food. After a while most will pick the pinkie out from between your fingers (obviously care is to be taken so you are not risking getting bitten), let them do this a few times then try leaving a pinkie in the tub overnight with them, if this does not work you can try wiggling a warmed pinkie on tongs - just dont do it too much or again they will get stressed.
Expect set backs with boigas, many do go off their food from time to time with no obvious reasons, so be prepared to start right back at square one. Also be prepared to offer a range of different foods as some will eat eggs, small quails and even insects and frogs.
I have had experience with 8 boiga species over the last 4 years, and feel this is the species of snake I know best.
 

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Hey Slippery, your mangrove is looking great, looks very healthy and what a superb photograph - one to be entered into a few photo competitions I feel.

For those who experience difficulty feeding boigas:-
Feeding young boigas is not really that difficult people, it simply takes a bit of patience and a bit of dedication on your part. For any that will not feed on their own I now just jump straight into a semi assist feed and continue this for at least a couple of months. I wait til its dark sit them on my knee in a tub and simply hold them behind the head and pop the pinkie into the mouth, most will open their mouths when simply pushing a pinkie head gently against it. Once it has taken it into its mouth then move extremely slowly or it WILL spit it out. Slowly lower it to the floor of the tub and very slowly let go of the head. If you move too quick it WILL spit it out so dont be tempted to move. Give yourself 20-30 minutes per hatchling, they will get quicker given time but you just have to be patient. Continue with this regime so that it is getting regular food. Do not handle the youngster as they almost all get stressed very easily and most will go off their food. After a while most will pick the pinkie out from between your fingers (obviously care is to be taken so you are not risking getting bitten), let them do this a few times then try leaving a pinkie in the tub overnight with them, if this does not work you can try wiggling a warmed pinkie on tongs - just dont do it too much or again they will get stressed.
Expect set backs with boigas, many do go off their food from time to time with no obvious reasons, so be prepared to start right back at square one. Also be prepared to offer a range of different foods as some will eat eggs, small quails and even insects and frogs.
I have had experience with 8 boiga species over the last 4 years, and feel this is the species of snake I know best.
I have one here at the moment, a mangrove and about 3-4ft apparently it was eating live anoles and ribbon snakes a few months ago but for the last 4 months has been being force fed rodents, it will only take food if its massaged about 2" down its throat, the aim is to get it to eat on its own in the end, what do you recon is the next step Angi? I have done it with other snakes, but have no experience with getting mangroves feeding.

Si
 

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It does not sound good Si, force feeding them is incredibly stressful for them and many simply do not survive the stress of this method of feeding for very long. Personally I would do as I outlined above and be VERY VERY patience with it and do not move whilst feeding. I know its a pain, but if you want to keep a boiga then you will have to get used to being prepared to doing this. I strongly feel that if force fed for any length of time it is reducing the chances of it a) surviving at all b) ever accepting food normally. I have found boigas totally different re getting them feeding to any other snake that I have come across (and thats quite a few through our shop)
I find it odd that it was feeding on anoles and ribbon snakes, never heard of that before, not exactly their natural diet. I have found mangroves to be more partial to chicks and quails initially, then moved onto rodents. How did it end up being force fed?
 

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For those who experience difficulty feeding boigas:-
Feeding young boigas is not really that difficult people, it simply takes a bit of patience and a bit of dedication on your part. For any that will not feed on their own I now just jump straight into a semi assist feed and continue this for at least a couple of months.

Expect set backs with boigas, many do go off their food from time to time with no obvious reasons, so be prepared to start right back at square one. Also be prepared to offer a range of different foods as some will eat eggs, small quails and even insects and frogs.
I have had experience with 8 boiga species over the last 4 years, and feel this is the species of snake I know best.
Agree there, as arboreals go they are amongst the easiest to feed. I love the fact that they usually keep chewing on a prey item that is placed between their lips... I imagine they are probably administering a defensive envenomation before realizing it is edible...

Out of 12 Boiga cyanea I have (wc or bred by me) every single one without fail has taken f/t using this method. Out of my seven self-bred babies, a couple will only eat when hand-fed, but otherwise are very greedy. They've just learned that I'm the Big Food-Bringer from the sky...

Similarly, I have 1.2 wc Boiga dendrophila and they all fed without hesitation virtually from day one. Two took straight from the tongs, one I had to "semi-assist feed" once. Obviously I was quite lucky with these (I don't think they were feeding at the importers, though).

Boiga "flavescens" (irregularis?) and Boiga kraepelini similarly gave me no problems to get feeding on pinkies/small fuzzies and then piggybacking more as they ate the first (easy to give nice big meals to!). The only Boiga species I have kept that seem to resist this method of feeding is B. cynodon although I finally got my CB babies going on chick legs.

Just a shame that other arboreals like Chrysopelea, Ahaetulla, Philothamnus and Hapsidophrys aren't so easy to get started!
:bash:

Nice to hear from another Boiga lover. Have you had similar experiences with B. cynodon, Angi? What other species have you kept? (B. nigriceps and B. drapiezi will be in there I bet?)
 

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My Boiga Irrigularis is an amazing feeder, which suprised me tbh... Hes gone through two perfect sheds since ive had him...

i can litterally see the difference in size every week

: victory:
 

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Not all my experiences have been with my own snakes, some at our shop. B.dendrophilla dendrophila ( both white and yellow types)
B.dendrophilla gemmicincta
B.cyanea
B.cynodon
B.nigriceps
B.irregularis
B.drapiezii (both green and red/brown types)
B.blandingi

Cynodon I have found to be very picky eaters, but Ive had most luck feeding chicks and young quails.

It is indeed good to see more boiga enthusiasts about. watch out for the next edition of reptile care as it contains a good article on B cyanea.
 
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