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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always wanted a pet snake, however I have always put it off. I keep lizards and turtles so have experience with reptiles. I would always talk to my friends who kept snakes telling them how jealous I was of them and they would always recommend species such as corns, royals, boa constrictors, etc. All of which I didn’t have room for. I wanted a snake which was easy to handle, easy to care for, hardy, unusual, rare and one which didn’t require lighting – all the snakes I found which fitted this criteria were large species which I didn’t have the room for. I first heard about the rubber boa about 2 years ago. I began researching it and found that it was the perfect snake for me, but there were a few problems; I didn’t like the fact they ate mice, as I have kept mice as pets in the past I found it hard to come to terms with this, there were very little captive care records of them and finally no one knew where to get them! So I spent around a year researching on how to care for them, so when I eventually found a breeder, I would know how to provide the correct husbandry. I eventually found two breeders last year. I contacted both of them and got information off them on care tips, the boas they had available and the prices of the snakes. I decided to get my boas off a breeder from Denmark. Due to personal issues I got the snakes put on hold for a year. Finally at Hamm in March they were picked up by a hired courier and delivered to me. I got a CB11 unrelated male and female pair. I have had them for over 2 weeks now and they are really amazing little snakes! I never imagined them to be so fascinating! They are a lot more active than I thought they would be. I am already talking with another breeder on getting some more next year hopefully.
I have called the male Kaa and the female Lamia. The male is half the size of the female. Kaa was in his burrow so I didn’t want to disturb him to get pictures, so here is Lamia.




 

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She is stunning, congratulations on them both! How are you enjoying being a snake keeper so far? :2thumb:

Rubber boas are indigenous to where I grew up (Pacific Northwest region of the United States) and they were one of my favourite species to find. Even the wild ones were incredibly docile and fascinating to watch. I'd love to own a pair eventually. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
She is stunning, congratulations on them both! How are you enjoying being a snake keeper so far? :2thumb:

Rubber boas are indigenous to where I grew up (Pacific Northwest region of the United States) and they were one of my favourite species to find. Even the wild ones were incredibly docile and fascinating to watch. I'd love to own a pair eventually. :)
Thanks, I am really enjoying snake keeping as I have wanted to do it for years and have finally taken the leap into it. They are native to where my cousins live too (Vegas), I go every year and each time try to find some but I haven't had any luck so far.

Stunning mate :flrt::flrt:
Thank you :)
 

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could't you have found somthing smaller to start with. what you go do when they start to size you up lol

congratulations on being able to find some
 

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wow, these are your first snakes :gasp:, you are now the person i'm going to use as an example whenever a "beginner snake" argument comes up. these are very interesting looking boas, how big do they get, and would you say they're similar in some ways to the sand boas?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
cool choice for first snake : victory:
could't you have found somthing smaller to start with. what you go do when they start to size you up lol

congratulations on being able to find some
wow, these are your first snakes :gasp:, you are now the person i'm going to use as an example whenever a "beginner snake" argument comes up. these are very interesting looking boas, how big do they get, and would you say they're similar in some ways to the sand boas?
Thanks guys :)

Except for the price tag and scarcity, they are the perfect first snakes. They are non-aggressive, handle well, hardy, easy to care for, can go for ages without food, don't eat as much as other snakes, do not need much room and require no heating equipment (as long as temps are roughly 21-26).
Also they don't grow large, females rarely reach 3ft with an average of 2ft and males half of that - so I have gathered from my research.
I don't know about the husbandry of sand boas so cannot comment sorry.
 

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rubbers!

Congrats on a great pick up, I wouldn't be without my pair, they're fascinating little snakes.
This is the first season that I've put them together, I keep mine identically to my rosy boas and they thrive.
There were a few at kempton last year.
 
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